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In C99, you can declare a flexible array member of a struct as such:

struct blah
{
    int foo[];
};

However, when someone here at work tried to compile some code using clang in C++, that syntax did not work. (It had been working with MSVC.) We had to convert it to:

struct blah
{
    int foo[0];
};

Looking through the C++ standard, I found no reference to flexible member arrays at all; I always thought [0] was an invalid declaration, but apparently for a flexible member array it is valid. Are flexible member arrays actually valid in C++? If so, is the correct declaration [] or [0]?

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3  
Can't you just use a std::vector<int> member and worry about more interesting stuff? Or is this a layout issue? –  FredOverflow Dec 10 '10 at 19:59
1  
That flexible-array-member tag seems a bit... lonely. But maybe it's just me. –  Marcus Fritzsch Dec 10 '10 at 20:09
1  
@FredOverflow: there is sometimes a need to have structures that can be used in both C and C++ (system APIs being one very common example). –  Michael Burr Dec 10 '10 at 20:45
1  
@FredOverflow, normally I would, but in this case, it's necessary to have a contiguous allocation for blah with a variable sized foo. It's certainly a good design question as to why we need it in the first place, which I can't get in to here. –  MSN Dec 10 '10 at 21:11
    
BTW: An array of size 0 is illegal in both C and C++. –  Deduplicator Sep 17 at 13:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

C++ was first standardized in 1998, so it predates the addition of flexible array members to C (which was new in C99). There was a corrigendum to C++ in 2003, but that didn't add any relevant new features. The next revision of C++ (C++0x) is still under development, and it seems flexible array members aren't added to it.

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Can you please update this answer? It seems that C++11 did not add flexible array members (§9.2/9), and it's looking like C++14 will be the same. –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 12 at 7:03

The second one will not contain elements but rather will point right after blah. So if you have a structure like this:

struct something
{
  int a, b;
  int c[0];
};

you can do things like this:

struct something *val = (struct something *)malloc(sizeof(struct something) + 5 * sizeof(int));
val->a = 1;
val->b = 2;
val->c[0] = 3;

In this case c will behave as an array with 5 ints but the data in the array will be after the something structure.

The product I'm working on uses this as a sized string:

struct String
{
  unsigned int allocated;
  unsigned int size;
  char data[0];
};

Because of the supported architectures this will consume 8 bytes plus allocated.

Of course all this is C but g++ for example accepts it without a hitch.

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That's pretty interesting. I imagine that you wouldn't be able to ever pass this struct to a function as value, right? as that would probably just pass the sizeof(String) which wouldn't take into account the size you allocated for data. But it should work as long as you only pass it as reference or pointer, is that right? –  filipe Dec 10 '10 at 20:15
    
Well, you can pass it but it will only pass the data in the string. Also, depending on the compiler it will generate some warnings. –  terminus Dec 10 '10 at 20:19
1  
This is not true. T[0] is neither a valid type specifier in C nor in C++. You have to use T[]. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 11 '10 at 10:35
1  
@Johannes it is valid in C99, see open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/newinc9x.htm –  terminus Dec 11 '10 at 11:10

C++ doesn't support C99 flexible array members at the end of structures, either using an empty index notation or a 0 index notation (barring vendor-specific extensions):

struct blah
{
    int count;
    int foo[];  // not valid C++
};

struct blah
{
    int count;
    int foo[0]; // also not valid C++
};

As far as I know, C++0x will not add this, either.

However, if you size the array to 1 element:

struct blah
{
    int count;
    int foo[1];
};

things are valid, and work quite well. You can allocate the appropriate memory with an expression that is unlikely to have off-by-one errors:

struct blah* p = (struct blah*) malloc( offsetof(struct blah, foo[desired_number_of_elements]);
if (p) {
    p->count = desired_number_of_elements;

    // initialize your p->foo[] array however appropriate - it has `count`
    // elements (indexable from 0 to count-1)
}

So it's portable between C90, C99 and C++ and works just as well as C99's flexible array members.

Raymond Chen did a nice writeup about this: Why do some structures end with an array of size 1?

Note: In Raymond Chen's article, there's a typo/bug in an example initializing the 'flexible' array. It should read:

for (DWORD Index = 0; Index < NumberOfGroups; Index++) { // note: used '<' , not '='
  TokenGroups->Groups[Index] = ...;
}
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1  
However, even if you allocate excess memory you still can't validly access members outside of the array bounds of one element. The behaviour is undefined; a C++ implementation would be within its rights to add bounds checking according to the actual type of the object constructed. –  Charles Bailey Dec 10 '10 at 21:14
    
@Charles - I don't think you're right about that (even pedantically), otherwise the following would be undefined behavior: int* p = malloc(sizeof(int)*4); p[3] = 0;. –  Michael Burr Dec 10 '10 at 22:01
    
@Michael: I think that the reason Charles said one element is not because he thinks it's impossible to allocate an array, but rather because 1 is the length of the array in your particular struct blah. The claim is that since p->foo is of type blah[1], then p->foo[1] is UB. However, although p->foo[1] is outside the object foo, it isn't outside the array of char that was allocated with malloc, so it is inside an object. With suitable casts via char* read access at least would be fine. I can't remember how the standards legalese falls out, though. –  Steve Jessop Dec 10 '10 at 22:23
    
Also, I can't remember whether it's legal for the structure blah to contain some padding after foo, that the implementation uses e.g. to detect buffer overruns using a magic number that should still be there later (and which perhaps is a trap representation for int on some exotic architecture). The implementation can't do that in an array, but possibly can in a class containing an array. Anyway, I think you need an implementation-specific guarantee to pull the trick. –  Steve Jessop Dec 10 '10 at 22:24
1  
Yes, I wasn't claiming that it isn't a useful technique, just that it's not strictly conforming. Unfortunately the safer idiom is also UB for a different reason. You can only perform pointer arithmetic on an object that actually exists and a POD object only starts to exist once memory of sufficient alignment and size is allocated. If something is declared with a very large array and you allocate not enough space for it, it can't start to exist. –  Charles Bailey Dec 10 '10 at 23:46

Both int foo[]; and int foo[0]; are incorrect in C++ (at least in such context). Use int *foo;.

When you declare such array in C++, its size should be defined in compile time. That is, you should rather specify array size explicitly, like int foo[5] or use initialization list like int foo[] = {1, 2, 3}. Unfortunately, you can't use initialization list for class member initialization.

EDIT

For serialization purposes use std::vector<int> foo. Once it is filled you can easily get a pointer to array of integers and its size:

int* begin = &foo[0];
std::size_t size = foo.size();
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3  
And what do you do if you want a contiguous structure to use for eaasy serialization? –  doron Dec 10 '10 at 20:09
1  
@doron std::vector<int>. It is guaranteed to be continuous in memory. –  Stas Dec 10 '10 at 20:12
2  
however, the memory used for the elements of the std::vector will not (in general) be contiguous with the structure that contains the std::vector member. –  Michael Burr Dec 10 '10 at 23:08

The better solution is to declare it as a pointer:

struct blah
{
    int* foo;
};

Or better yet, to declare it as a std::vector:

struct blah
{
    std::vector<int> foo;
};
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1  
Neither of these are easily serializable which is the whole point of flexible array members. –  doron Dec 10 '10 at 20:11
2  
no, int[0] does not create a pointer. See answer by terminus. –  kriss Dec 10 '10 at 20:12
    
@doron: The vector solution is serializeable as vectors are guaranteed to be contiguous. Even the pointer version is fairly easy to serialize. –  Zac Howland Dec 10 '10 at 20:34
    
@kriss: Edited - I submitted before I meant to. I was trying to say it allows you to create a data member that behaves like a pointer, but removed it as it could be confusing. In C++, there is really no need to even bother with this syntax "hack" that was used in C. Sorry for the confusion. –  Zac Howland Dec 10 '10 at 20:38
    
@Zac Howland: No problem. I would call that an address, and it's interest is that it also allow to define a memory aligned zero length member in a structure. Even with C++ there is cases when it's useful, when dealing with hardware aware low level programs. And I do agree with doron about serialization. –  kriss Dec 10 '10 at 21:20

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