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Doing audio processing (though it could just as well be image processing) I have a one-dimensional array of numbers. (They happen to be 16-bit signed integers representing audio samples, this question could apply to floats or integers of different sizes equally.)

In order to match audio with different frequencies (e.g. blend a 44.1kHz sample with a 22kHz sample), I need to either stretch or squash the array of values to meet a specific length.

Halving the array is simple: drop every other sample.

[231, 8143, 16341, 2000, -9352, ...] => [231, 16341, -9352, ...]

Doubling the array width is slightly less simple: double each entry in place (or optionally perform some interpolation between neighboring 'real' samples).

[231, 8143, 16341, 2000, -9352, ...] => [231, 4187, 8143, 12242, 16341, ...]

What I want is an efficient, simple algorithm that handles any scaling factor, and (ideally) optionally supports performing interpolation of one kind or another in the process.

My use case happens to be using Ruby arrays, but I'll happily take answers in most any language or pseudo-code.

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Great question. –  the Tin Man Dec 11 '10 at 0:06
2  
for halving the array, normally you want to lowpass before dropping samples (otherwise, there is potentially aliasing). –  lijie Dec 11 '10 at 1:29

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is something I threw together in a few minutes just as I was leaving work, then recreated after a glass of wine after dinner:

sample = [231, 8143, 16341, 2000, -9352]
new_sample = []
sample.zip([] * sample.size).each_cons(2) do |a,b|
  a[1] = (a[0] + b[0]).to_f / 2 # <-- simple average could be replaced with something smarter
  new_sample << a
end
new_sample.flatten!
new_sample[-1] = new_sample[-2]
new_sample # => [231, 4187.0, 8143, 12242.0, 16341, 9170.5, 2000, 2000]

I think it's a start but obviously not finished since the -9352 didn't propagate into the final array. I didn't bother converting floats to ints; I figure you know how to do that. :-)

I'd like to find a better way to iterate over each_cons. I'd rather use a map than each* but this works OK.

Here's what the loop iterates over:

asdf = sample.zip([] * sample.size).each_cons(2).to_a 
asdf # => [[[231, nil], [8143, nil]], [[8143, nil], [16341, nil]], [[16341, nil], [2000, nil]], [[2000, nil], [-9352, nil]]]

each_cons is nice because it steps through the array returning slices of it, which seemed like a useful way to build up the averages.

[0,1,2,3].each_cons(2).to_a # => [[0, 1], [1, 2], [2, 3]]

EDIT:

I like this better:

sample = [231, 8143, 16341, 2000, -9352]

samples = sample.zip([] * sample.size).each_cons(2).to_a 
new_sample = samples.map { |a,b|
  a[1] = (a[0] + b[0]).to_f / 2
  a
}.flatten
new_sample << sample[-1]
new_sample # => [231, 4187.0, 8143, 12242.0, 16341, 9170.5, 2000, -3676.0, -9352]
share|improve this answer
    
I really like the idea of using each_cons for interpolation, thanks! –  Phrogz Dec 11 '10 at 5:30
    
Thanks. I was literally ready to leave when I saw your question, and was thinking what would make it easy to double an array and supply slots for new values, and zip plus each_cons popped into mind. I'm not too happy I sat at my desk instead of heading home, but if it helps it's worth it. :-) –  the Tin Man Dec 11 '10 at 5:40
    
I hope it was a red wine, a nice Shiraz perhaps. –  mu is too short Dec 21 '11 at 2:34
    
Back then it was a Chardonnay, now it'd be a Shiraz. :-) –  the Tin Man Dec 21 '11 at 5:06

The array/matrix math features you're looking for are typically found in "Scientific Computing" libraries. NArray may be a good place to start for Ruby.

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I was going to post a snarky comment about algorithms versus libraries, but then I really looked at NArray and found that it does have reshape which may be exactly what I want. +1 for forcing me to look more closely at it :) –  Phrogz Dec 11 '10 at 2:17
    
In Python it seems everyone knows about NumPy, and lots of stuff depends on it. NArray is like a dark secret in Ruby. +1 for showing it to more people. –  Jergason Dec 11 '10 at 2:20

This operation is called upsampling (when the sample rate is increased) or downsampling (when the same rate is decreased). Before downsampling (or after upsampling), it is necessary to apply an anti-aliasing (or anti-image) filter to prevent corruption of your audio signal. These filters are typically implemented as IIR filters.

Suggested steps to solve your problem:

  1. Find/write Ruby code to implement an IIR filter.
  2. Find/design IIR filter coefficients to implement an appropriate anti-(aliasing/image) filter

It's not hard to implement an IIR filter; the output of the filter at all times is a linear combination of the previous N inputs and the previous M outputs. If there is a Ruby DSP (digital signal processing) library, it will definitely have this.

Designing the filter coefficients does involve some subtlety.

Downsampling is sometimes known as decimation and is implemented in some languages as a function called "decimate". For instance, Matlab's decimate function does both the anti-aliasing and the down-sampling. Googling around I found a Python implementation; maybe you'll find a Ruby implementation.

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libsamplerate is sort of the [open source] audio standard for arbitrary resampling ratios with antialiasing and interpolation. I don't know whether you can find a binding for it in Ruby. –  Matthew Hall Nov 24 '12 at 23:24

In other words, you want to resample the audio streams.

Your plan is sound although holding at the last sample is not a very good interpolator.

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Yes, that's what I want to do; I've put the word resampling in the title to make it clear. I understand the concepts involved. What I'm looking for is more than a Wikipedia link: actual algorithms, libraries, white papers, or (best of all) personal experience advice on providing good resampling. –  Phrogz Dec 10 '10 at 21:37

The common technique to achieve this: The All-Pass filter.

You create the new samples, with zeroes when you want to interpolate sample values, and with your original unmodified sample value when you know (of course only at those index where you have the exact sample value from your source).

You get something like ......|......|......|.....|.....|.... with . being zero and | some of your original samples values.

You send this new stream to an All-Pass filter. The output of this filter is an interpolated version of your sample stream at your new frequency. It is the resulting sound you want.

The advantage of this technique is that it doesnt introduce aliasing artifacts in your sound, it doesnt add noise.

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1  
"all pass filter" is definitely the wrong term. you send the stream through a lowpass filter. a non trivial "all pass filter" changes the phase between different frequencies (since it can't do anything else - it has a unit amplitude response), which is almost certainly not what is desired here. you are actually describing band-limited interpolation. –  lijie Dec 11 '10 at 1:27
    
"Design and implementation of efficient resampling filters using polyphase recursive all-pass filters" I think this was the excellent article that explained carefully this technique. And as far as I remember this technique was used in music dsp field (digital synthesizers)... at least in the late nineties. – –  Stephane Rolland Dec 11 '10 at 2:05
    
The tehcnique is really subtle, just to sum it up: the new stream ....|....|....|.... is a distorted version of the original source. the peaks ...|... contain extremely high frequencies, far more that what the new sampling frequency can even handle ! ! ! so when passing through the digital ALLPASS filter ( I insist ), only the possible frequencies will be outputed, because our digital ALLPASS filter is designed to work with a finite sample history... And thus the resulting output is a smooth resampled sound. The price to pay is only some phase distortion. –  Stephane Rolland Dec 11 '10 at 2:15
1  
"Far more than what the new sampling frequency can even handle" is terribly inaccurate. One can always reconstruct some signal that is bandlimited (to within Nyquist bounds) from a sampled signal. If the statement is "... more than what the original sampling frequency can handle" it would be acceptable. –  lijie Dec 11 '10 at 4:17

For completeness, here's a compress/stretch function I wrote for Ruby Arrays as a first pass. It performs no interpolation whatsoever, simply removing or repeating values. But it is simple :)

class Array
  def stretch( factor=1.0 )
    factor = factor.to_f
    Array.new (length*factor).ceil do |i|
      self[(i/factor).floor]
    end
  end
end

a = (0..9).to_a
p a
#=> [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

(0.2).step( 3.0, 0.2 ) do |factor|
  p a.stretch(factor)
end
#=> [0, 5]
#=> [0, 2, 5, 7]
#=> [0, 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9]
#=> [0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8]
#=> [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
#=> [0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
#=> [0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 7, 8, 9, 9]
#=> [0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 7, 8, 8, 9]
#=> [0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8, 9]
#=> [0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8, 9, 9]
#=> [0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8, 9, 9]
#=> [0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 9, 9, 9]
#=> [0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 9, 9, 9]
#=> [0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 9, 9, 9]
#=> [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 9, 9, 9]
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Even though I found this question a year late, I want in! Here's some Objective-C code that I used to solve this problem in Hexaphone.

I use it to precalculate the 31 halftone offsets of one or more samples - one for each of 31 notes on the keyboard. The samples are intended to be continually looped as long as the key is held.

#define kBytesPerFrame 2
-(SInt16*) createTransposedBufferFrom:(SInt16*)sourceBuffer sourceFrameCount:(UInt32)sourceFrameCount destFrameCount:(UInt32)destFrameCount {

    // half step up:  1.05946;
    // half step down: .94387
    Float32 frequencyMultiplier = (Float32) sourceFrameCount / (Float32) destFrameCount;

    SInt16 *destBuffer = malloc(destFrameCount * kBytesPerFrame);

    Float32 idxTarget; // the extrapolated, floating-point index for the target value
    UInt16 idxPrevNeighbor, idxNextNeighbor; // the indicies of the two "nearest neighbors" to the target value
    Float32 nextNeighborBias; // to what degree we should weight one neighbor over the other (out of 100%)
    Float32 prevNeighborBias; // 100% - nextNeighborBias;  included for readability - could just divide by next for a performance improvement

    // for each desired frame for the destination buffer:
    for(int idxDest=0; idxDest<destFrameCount; idxDest++) {

        idxTarget = idxDest * frequencyMultiplier;
        idxPrevNeighbor = floor(idxTarget);
        idxNextNeighbor = ceil(idxTarget);

        if(idxNextNeighbor >= sourceFrameCount) {
            // loop around - don't overflow!
            idxNextNeighbor = 0;
        }

        // if target index is [4.78], use [4] (prev) with a 22% weighting, and [5] (next) with a 78% weighting
        nextNeighborBias = idxTarget - idxPrevNeighbor;  
        prevNeighborBias = 1.0 - nextNeighborBias; 


        Float32 interpolatedValue = sourceBuffer[idxPrevNeighbor] * prevNeighborBias 
                                  + sourceBuffer[idxNextNeighbor] * nextNeighborBias;
        destBuffer[idxDest] = round(interpolatedValue); // convert to int, store

    } 

    return destBuffer;

}
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There is a decimating, interpolating, mixing FIR filter along with the Parks-McClellan algorithm for generating the taps in the following project.

https://github.com/ham21/radio

I know of nothing else in Ruby that will perform the audio functions you requested.

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