Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to rename a linux file to a filename that is legal in windows. It should not be longer than is allowed and should not have characters that are not allowed in windows. Sometimes I copy the title from papers to a filename and they have special characters such as , ®, or ?

Also there is there are some kind of characters sometimes at the ends of lines generated when copying and pasting a title from a pdf. You can see them when using sed -n 'l':

echo 'Estrogen receptor agonists and estrogen attenuate TNF-α induced
α
apoptosis in VSC4.1 motoneurons.pdf' | sed -n 'l'
Estrogen receptor agonists and estrogen attenuate TNF-\316\261 induce\
d$
\316\261$
apoptosis in VSC4.1 motoneurons.pdf$

or

echo 'A synthetic review of the five molecular Sorlie’s subtypes in
breast cancer' | sed -n 'l' 
A synthetic review of the \357\254\201ve molecular Sorlie\342\200\231\
s subtypes in$
breast cancer$

I have started a script but it is not elegant and incomplete. Has someone done something like this already or is there a fast elegant way to do it?

fn2win="$1"
testFn=$(echo "$fn2win" | sed -n 'l')
#SPEC_CHAR="ÀÁÂÃÄÅÇÈÉÊËÌÍÎÏÐÑÒÓÔÕÖØÙÚÛÜÝÞàáâãäåçèéêëìíîïðñòóôõöøùúûüýþÿ"
#NORM_CHAR="AAAAAACEEEEIIIIDNOOOOOOUUUUYPaaaaaaceeeeiiiionoooooouuuuyby"
#SPEC_LOW_CHAR="aàáâãäåāăąbḃcćçčĉċdḑďḋđeèéěêëēĕęėfḟƒgǵģǧĝğġǥhĥħiìíîĩïīĭįıjĵkḱķǩlĺļľłmṁnńņňñoòóôõöōŏøpṗqrŕŗřsśşšŝṡſtţťṫŧuùúûũüůūŭųvwẁẃŵẅxyỳýŷÿzźžż"
#NORM_LOW_CHAR="aaaaaaaaaabbccccccdddddeeeeeeeeeefffgggggggghhhiiiiiiiiiijjkkkklllllmmnnnnnoooooooooppqrrrrssssssstttttuuuuuuuuuuvwwwwwxyyyyyzzzz"
#SPEC_CAP_CHAR="AÀÁÂÃÄÅĀĂĄBḂCĆÇČĈĊDḐĎḊĐEÈÉĚÊËĒĔĘĖFḞGǴĢǦĜĞĠǤHĤĦIÌÍÎĨÏĪĬĮİJĴKḰĶǨĸLĹĻĽŁMṀNŃŅŇÑOÒÓÔÕÖŌŎØPṖQRŔŖŘSŚŞŠŜṠTŢŤṪŦUÙÚÛŨÜŮŪŬŲVWẀẂŴẄXYỲÝŶŸZŹŽŻ"
#SPEC_CAP_CHAR="AAAAAAAAAABBCCCCCCDDDDDEEEEEEEEEEFFGGGGGGGGHHHIIIIIIIIIIJJKKKKKLLLLLMMNNNNNOOOOOOOOOPPQRRRRSSSSSSTTTTTUUUUUUUUUUVWWWWWXYYYYYZZZZ"
#sed -e "y/'$SPEC_CHAR'/'$NORM_CHAR'/"
if [ "$fn2win" != "$testFn" ]; then
  newLinFn=$(echo "$fn2win" | fromdos | tr "\n" " " |\
     sed -e "
     s/[?()\[\]=+<>:;©®”,*|]/_/g
     s/"$'\t'"/ /g
     s/–/-/g
     s/’/'/g
     s/α/alpha/g
     s/β/beta/g
     s/µ/micro/g
     s/Æ/AE/g
     s/Ǽ/AE/g
     s/æ/ae/g
     s/ǽ/ae/g
     s/DZ/DZ/g
     s/DŽ/DZ/g
     s/Dž/Dz/g
     s/Dz/Dz/g
     s/dz/dz/g
     s/dž/dz/g
     s/ff/ff/g
     s/fi/fi/g
     s/fl/fl/g
     s/ffi/ffi/g
     s/ffl/ffl/g
     s/ſt/ft/g
     s/IJ/IJ/g
     s/ij/ij/g
     s/LJ/LJ/g
     s/Lj/Lj/g
     s/lj/lj/g
     s/NJ/NJ/g
     s/Nj/Nj/g
     s/nj/nj/g
     s/Œ/OE/g
     s/œ/oe/g
     s/ß/SZ/g
     s/\"/_/g
     s/[[:cntrl:]]/_/g
     s/\ $//g
     " |\
   fold -s -w 251 | head -1 | sed 's/\ $/.pdf/')
  if [ "$fn2win" != "$newLinFn" ]; then
      mv "$fn2win" "$newLinFn"
    fi
fi
winFn=$(echo "z:"$newLinFn | sed 's/\//\\/g' )
share|improve this question
    
I don't think this is off-topic, I'm not sure why there was a close vote for this –  D W Dec 10 '10 at 21:26
    
Someone probably felt that stringing together a bunch of sed operations looks more like a usage question than a programming one. It's a debatable position. –  Chris Stratton Dec 10 '10 at 21:43
    
Thank you for the explanation. I think this is a useful function to be able to do. I need to use PDF-XChange Viewer for it's highlighting capabilities through wine and this would be useful for that. I look at, and highlight hundreds of papers as I'm sure other researchers do, so someone must have ran into this problem. Where is an appropriate place to ask this question? –  D W Dec 10 '10 at 21:47
    
ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-sed3.html seems useful to organize the sed commands –  D W Dec 10 '10 at 22:21
1  
Related to stackoverflow.com/questions/620605/… ? –  blueberryfields Dec 11 '10 at 0:04
show 1 more comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This looks like it should do it: http://pwet.fr/man/linux/commandes/konwert

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure this would work for what I am trying to do, it seems to convert encodings but I don't see an obvious conversion for my purpose. –  D W Dec 13 '10 at 23:35
    
Converting to ascii would take you most of the way there, limiting the number of hardcoded conversions you have left to handle. –  OliJG Dec 14 '10 at 10:43
    
+1 konwert utf8-ascii is helpful and at least gets rid of international characters and converts ligatures into their separate characters. konwert utf8-tex is also interesting because it converts greek symbols such as α into \alpha. –  D W Dec 15 '10 at 17:30
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.