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I am trying to write an app that does something specific when it is brought back to the foreground after some amount of time. Is there a way to detect when an app is sent to the background or brought to the foreground?

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1  
May be to add a use case to the question because it doesn't seem to be obvious, so it's not addressed in the answers given. The app may start another app (Gallery for example), which will still reside in the same stack and appear as one of the app's screens, and then press Home button. None of the methods relying on App lifecycle (or even memory management) are able to detect this. They would trigger background state right when external Activity appears, not when you press Home. – Dennis K Mar 25 '15 at 19:41

24 Answers 24

up vote 43 down vote accepted

The onPause() and onResume() methods are called when the application is brought to the background and into the foreground again. However, they are also called when the application is started for the first time and before it is killed. You can read more in Activity.

There isn't any direct approach to get the application status while in the background or foreground, but even I have faced this issue and found the solution with onWindowFocusChanged and onStop.

For more details check here Android: Solution to detect when an Android app goes to the background and come back to the foreground without getRunningTasks or getRunningAppProcesses.

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63  
However this approach causes false positives as others pointed out, because these methods are also called when transitioning between activities in the same app. – John Lehmann Feb 6 '13 at 22:41
7  
It's worse than that. I tried it and sometimes the onResume is called while the phone is locked. If you see the definition of the onResume in the documentation, you will find: Keep in mind that onResume is not the best indicator that your activity is visible to the user; a system window such as the keyguard may be in front. Use onWindowFocusChanged(boolean) to know for certain that your activity is visible to the user (for example, to resume a game).developer.android.com/reference/android/app/… – J-Rou Apr 9 '13 at 15:50
2  
The solution posted in the link doesn't use onResume/onPause, instead a combination of onBackPressed, onStop, onStart and onWindowsFocusChanged. It did work for me, and I have a rather complex UI hierarchy (with drawers, dynamic viewpagers, etc.) – Martín Marconcini Jul 18 '13 at 22:17
5  
The onPause and onResume are Activity specific. Not Application. When an App is put on background and then resumed, it resumes the specific Activity it was in before going to background. This means that you would need to implement whatever you want done on resuming from background in all Activity of your Application. I believe the original question was looking for something like a "onResume" for Application and not Activity. – SysHex Aug 20 '13 at 12:04
1  
See d60402's answer for a solution that is a little more universal than the one in the linked blog. Vardan's solution relies on there being a single entry activity to the app and no way to return to that activity besides using back. – Neil Miller Sep 16 '13 at 20:45

Here's how I've managed to solve this. It works on the premise that using a time reference between activity transitions will most likely provide adequate evidence that an app has been "backgrounded" or not.

First, I've used an android.app.Application instance (let's call it MyApplication) which has a Timer, a TimerTask, a constant to represent the maximum number of milliseconds that the transition from one activity to another could reasonably take (I went with a value of 2s), and a boolean to indicate whether or not the app was "in the background":

public class MyApplication extends Application {

    private Timer mActivityTransitionTimer;
    private TimerTask mActivityTransitionTimerTask;
    public boolean wasInBackground;
    private final long MAX_ACTIVITY_TRANSITION_TIME_MS = 2000;
    ...

The application also provides two methods for starting and stopping the timer/task:

public void startActivityTransitionTimer() {
    this.mActivityTransitionTimer = new Timer();
    this.mActivityTransitionTimerTask = new TimerTask() {
        public void run() {
            MyApplication.this.wasInBackground = true;
        }
    };

    this.mActivityTransitionTimer.schedule(mActivityTransitionTimerTask,
                                           MAX_ACTIVITY_TRANSITION_TIME_MS);
}

public void stopActivityTransitionTimer() {
    if (this.mActivityTransitionTimerTask != null) {
        this.mActivityTransitionTimerTask.cancel();
    }

    if (this.mActivityTransitionTimer != null) {
        this.mActivityTransitionTimer.cancel();
    }

    this.wasInBackground = false;
}

The last piece of this solution is to add a call to each of these methods from the onResume() and onPause() events of all activities or, preferably, in a base Activity from which all of your concrete Activities inherit:

@Override
public void onResume()
{
    super.onResume();

    MyApplication myApp = (MyApplication)this.getApplication();
    if (myApp.wasInBackground)
    {
        //Do specific came-here-from-background code
    }

    myApp.stopActivityTransitionTimer();
}

@Override
public void onPause()
{
    super.onPause();
    ((MyApplication)this.getApplication()).startActivityTransitionTimer();
}

So in the case when the user is simply navigating between the activities of your app, the onPause() of the departing activity starts the timer, but almost immediately the new activity being entered cancels the timer before it can reach the max transition time. And so wasInBackground would be false.

On the other hand when an Activity comes to the foreground from the Launcher, device wake up, end phone call, etc., more than likely the timer task executed prior to this event, and thus wasInBackground was set to true.

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2  
You are a lifesaver. This is the best way for detecting that an app has come fully to the background in my opinion. People must remember to have a superactivity for all their activities which implements the start and stop timer. – Andreas Rudolph Apr 12 '13 at 9:27
2  
Hi d60402, your answer is really helpful.. thank you so much for this reply... small notice.. MyApplication should mention in Manifest file application tag like android:name="MyApplication", otherwise app crashes... just to help somebody like me – praveenb Aug 1 '13 at 6:04
2  
mark of the great programmer, simple solution to one of the most complicated problem I ever came accross. – Aashish Bhatnagar Jan 4 '14 at 16:53
17  
This is a nice and simple implementation. However I believe this should be implemented in onStart/onStop rather than onPause/onResume. The onPause will be called even if I start a dialog which partially covers the activity. And closing the dialog would actually call onResume make it appear as if the app has just come to foreground – Shubhayu Mar 25 '14 at 17:16
4  
I'm hoping to use a variation of this solution. The point about dialogues identified above is a problem for me, so I tried @Shubhayu's suggestion (onStart/onStop). The doesn't help however because when going A->B, Activity B's onStart() is called before Activity A's onStop(). – Trevor Aug 14 '14 at 14:12

Warning: this is only good if you're developing for ICE CREAM SANDWICH (API LEVEL 14)

UPDATE / NOTES (November 2015): People has been making two comments, first is that >= should be used instead of == because the documentation states that you shouldn't check for exact values. This is fine for most cases, but bear in mind that if you only care about doing something when the app went to the background, you will have to use == and also combine it with another solution (like Activity Lifecycle callbacks), or you may not get your desired effect. The example (and this happened to me) is that if you want to lock your app with a password screen when it goes to the background (like 1Password if you're familiar with it), you may accidentally lock your app if you run low on memory and are suddenly testing for >= TRIM_MEMORY, because Android will trigger a LOW MEMORY call and that's higher than yours. So be careful how/what you test.

Additionally, some people have asked about how to detect when you get back.

The simplest way I can think of is explained below, but since some people are unfamiliar with it, I'm adding some pseudo code right here. Assuming you have YourApplication and the MemoryBoss classes, in your class BaseActivity extends Activity (you will need to create one if you don't have one).

@Override
protected void onStart() {
    super.onStart();

    if (mApplication.wasInBackground()) {
        // HERE YOU CALL THE CODE YOU WANT TO HAPPEN ONLY ONCE WHEN YOUR APP WAS RESUMED FROM BACKGROUND
        mApplication.setWasInBackground(false);
    }
}

I recommend onStart because Dialogs can pause an activity so I bet you don't want your app to think "it went to the background" if all you did was display a full screen dialog, but your mileage may vary.

And that's all. The code in the if block will only be executed once, even if you go to another activity, the new one (that also extends BaseActivity) will report wasInBackground is false so it won't execute the code, until onMemoryTrimmed is called and the flag is set to true again.

Hope that helps.

UPDATE / NOTES (April 2015): Before you go all Copy and Paste on this code, note that I have found a couple of instances where it may not be 100% reliable and must be combined with other methods to achieve the best results. Notably, there are two known instances where the onTrimMemory call back is not guaranteed to be executed:

  1. If your phone locks the screen while your app is visible (say your device locks after nn minutes), this callback is not called (or not always) because the lockscreen is just on top, but your app is still "running" albeit covered.

  2. If your device is relatively low on memory (and under memory stress), the Operating System seems to ignore this call and go straight to more critical levels.

Now, depending how important it's for you to know when your app went to the background, you may or may not need to extend this solution together with keeping track of the activity lifecycle and whatnot.

Just keep the above in mind and have a good QA team ;)

END OF UPDATE

It may be late but there's a reliable method in Ice Cream Sandwich (API 14) and Above.

Turns out that when your app has no more visible UI, a callback is triggered. The callback, which you can implement in a custom class, is called ComponentCallbacks2 (yes, with a two). This callback is only available in API Level 14 (Ice Cream Sandwich) and above.

You basically get a call to the method:

public abstract void onTrimMemory (int level)

The Level is 20 or more specifically

public static final int TRIM_MEMORY_UI_HIDDEN

I've been testing this and it always works, because level 20 is just a "suggestion" that you might want to release some resources since your app is no longer visible.

To quote the official docs:

Level for onTrimMemory(int): the process had been showing a user interface, and is no longer doing so. Large allocations with the UI should be released at this point to allow memory to be better managed.

Of course, you should implement this to actually do what it says (purge memory that hasn't been used in certain time, clear some collections that have been sitting unused, etc. The possibilities are endless (see the official docs for other possible more critical levels).

But, the interesting thing, is that the OS is telling you: HEY, your app went to the background!

Which is exactly what you wanted to know in the first place.

How do you determine when you got back?

Well that's easy, I'm sure you have a "BaseActivity" so you can use your onResume() to flag the fact that you're back. Because the only time you will be saying you're not back is when you actually receive a call to the above onTrimMemory method.

It works. You don't get false positives. If an activity is resuming, you're back, 100% of the times. If the user goes to the back again, you get another onTrimMemory() call.

You need to suscribe your Activities (or better yet, a custom class).

The easiest way to guarantee that you always receive this is to create a simple class like this:

public class MemoryBoss implements ComponentCallbacks2 {
    @Override
    public void onConfigurationChanged(final Configuration newConfig) {
    }

    @Override
    public void onLowMemory() {
    }

    @Override
    public void onTrimMemory(final int level) {
        if (level == ComponentCallbacks2.TRIM_MEMORY_UI_HIDDEN) {
            // We're in the Background
        }
        // you might as well implement some memory cleanup here and be a nice Android dev.
    }
}

In order to use this, in your Application implementation (you have one, RIGHT?), do something like:

MemoryBoss mMemoryBoss;
@Override
public void onCreate() {
   super.onCreate();
   if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.ICE_CREAM_SANDWICH) {
      mMemoryBoss = new MemoryBoss();
      registerComponentCallbacks(mMemoryBoss);
   } 
}

If you create an Interface you could add an else to that if and implement ComponentCallbacks (without the 2) used in anything below API 14. That callback only has the onLowMemory() method and does not get called when you go to the background, but you should use it to trim memory.

Now launch your App and press home. Your onTrimMemory(final int level) method should be called (hint: add logging).

The last step is to unregister from the callback. Probably the best place is the onTerminate() method of your App, but, that method doesn't get called on a real device:

/**
 * This method is for use in emulated process environments.  It will
 * never be called on a production Android device, where processes are
 * removed by simply killing them; no user code (including this callback)
 * is executed when doing so.
 */

So unless you really have a situation where you no longer want to be registered, you can safety ignore it, since your process is dying at OS level anyway.

If you decide to unregister at some point (if you, for example, provide a shutdown mechanism for your app to clean up and die), you can do:

unregisterComponentCallbacks(mMemoryBoss);

And that's it.

share|improve this answer
    
When checking this from a service, seems to only fire when the home button is pressed. Pressing the back button doesn't fire this on KitKat. – Learn OpenGL ES Feb 12 '14 at 15:55
    
The service has no UI so it could be related to that. Do the check in your base activity, not on a service. You want to know when your UI is hidden (and perhaps tell the service, so it goes Foreground) – Martín Marconcini Feb 12 '14 at 19:03
    
It doesn't work when you turn off your phone. It is not triggered. – Juangcg Apr 30 '14 at 11:52
2  
Using the ComponentCallbacks2.onTrimMemory() (in combination with ActivityLifecycleCallbacks) is the only reliable solution I found so far, thanks Martin! For those interested, see my provided answer. – rickul Jun 2 '15 at 13:41
2  
I've been using this method since a year ago and it's always been reliable to me. It's good to know other people use it too. I just use level >= ComponentCallbacks2.TRIM_MEMORY_UI_HIDDEN which avoids the problem in your update, point 2. Regarding the point 1, it's not a concern to me, since the app didn't really go to the background, so that's the way it's supposed to work. – sorianiv Jun 30 '15 at 15:02

If your app consists of multiple activites and/or stacked activites like a tab bar widget, then overriding onPause() and onResume() will not work. I.e when starting a new activity the current activites will get paused before the new one is created. The same applies when finishing (using "back" button) an activity.

I've found two methods that seem to work as wanted.

The first one requires the GET_TASKS permission and consists of a simple method that checks if the top running activity on the device belongs to application, by comparing package names:

private boolean isApplicationBroughtToBackground() {
    ActivityManager am = (ActivityManager) context.getSystemService(Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE);
    List<RunningTaskInfo> tasks = am.getRunningTasks(1);
    if (!tasks.isEmpty()) {
        ComponentName topActivity = tasks.get(0).topActivity;
        if (!topActivity.getPackageName().equals(context.getPackageName())) {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

This method was found in the Droid-Fu (now called Ignition) framework.

The second method that I've implemented my self does not require the GET_TASKS permission, which is good. Instead it is a little more complicated to implement.

In you MainApplication class you have a variable that tracks number of running activities in your application. In onResume() for each activity you increase the variable and in onPause() you decrease it.

When the number of running activities reaches 0, the application is put into background IF the following conditions are true:

  • The activity being paused is not being finished ("back" button was used). This can be done by using method activity.isFinishing()
  • A new activity (same package name) is not being started. You can override the startActivity() method to set a variable that indicates this and then reset it in onPostResume(), which is the last method to be run when an activity is created/resumed.

When you can detect that the application has resigned to the background it is easy detect when it is brought back to foreground as well.

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8  
Google will probably reject an app that uses ActivityManager.getRunningTasks(). The documentation states that it is foe dev purposes only. developer.android.com/reference/android/app/… – Sky Kelsey Sep 19 '12 at 1:05
    
1  
I found I had to use a combination of these approaches. onUserLeaveHint() was called when launching an activity in 14. ` @Override public void onUserLeaveHint() { inBackground = isApplicationBroughtToBackground(); } ` – listing boat Jan 25 '13 at 22:38
4  
Users won't be too happy about using a powerful permission android.permission.GET_TASKS. – MSquare Jul 16 '13 at 12:30
3  
getRunningTasks is deprecated in API level 21. – Noya Jan 13 '15 at 15:00

We use this method. It looks too simple to work, but it was well-tested in our app and in fact works surprisingly well in all cases, including going to home screen by "home" button, by "return" button, or after screen lock. Give it a try.

Idea is, when in foreground, Android always starts new activity just before stopping previous one. That's not guaranteed, but that's how it works. BTW, Flurry seems to use the same logic (just a guess, I didn't check that, but it hooks at the same events).

public abstract class BaseActivity extends Activity {

    private static int sessionDepth = 0;

    @Override
    protected void onStart() {
        super.onStart();       
        sessionDepth++;
    }

    @Override
    protected void onStop() {
        super.onStop();
        if (sessionDepth > 0)
            sessionDepth--;
        if (sessionDepth == 0) {
            // app went to background
        }
    }

}

Edit: as per comments, we also moved to onStart() in later versions of the code. Also, I'm adding super calls, which were missing from my initial post, because this was more of a concept than a working code.

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2  
This is the most reliable answer, although I use onStart instead of onResume. – Greg Ennis Oct 19 '14 at 13:55
    
You should add calls to super.onResume() and super.onStop() in the overriden methods. Otherwise an android.app.SuperNotCalledException is thrown. – Jan Laussmann Nov 26 '14 at 11:54
1  
for me it doesn't work... or at least it fire the event when you are rotating the device too (which is kind of a false positive imho). – Noya Jan 13 '15 at 14:56
    
Very simple and effective solution! But I'm not sure it works with partially transparent activities that let some parts of the previous activity visible. From the docs, onStop is called when the activity is no longer visible to the user. – Nicolas Buquet May 29 '15 at 8:19
3  
what happens if the user changes the orientation on the first activity? It will report that the app went to background which isn't true. How do you handle this scenario? – Nimrod Dayan Sep 2 '15 at 14:03

Consider using onUserLeaveHint. This will only be called when your app goes into the background. onPause will have corner cases to handle, since it can be called for other reasons; for example if the user opens another activity in your app such as your settings page, your main activity's onPause method will be called even though they are still in your app; tracking what is going in will lead to bugs when you can instead simply use the onUserLeaveHint callback which does what you are asking.

When on UserLeaveHint is called, you can set a boolean inBackground flag to true. When onResume is called, only assume you came back into the foreground if the inBackground flag is set. This is because onResume will also be called on your main activity if the user was just in your settings menu and never left the app.

Remember that if the user hits the home button while in your settings screen, onUserLeaveHint will be called in your settings activity, and when they return onResume will be called in your settings activity. If you only have this detection code in your main activity you will miss this use case. To have this code in all your activities without duplicating code, have an abstract activity class which extends Activity, and put your common code in it. Then each activity you have can extend this abstract activity.

For example:

public abstract AbstractActivity extends Activity {
    private static boolean inBackground = false;

    @Override
    public void onResume() {
        if (inBackground) {
            // You just came from the background
            inBackground = false;
        }
        else {
            // You just returned from another activity within your own app
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onUserLeaveHint() {
        inBackground = true;
    }
}

public abstract MainActivity extends AbstractActivity {
    ...
}

public abstract SettingsActivity extends AbstractActivity {
    ...
}
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15  
onUserLeaveHint is also called when navigating to another activity – Jonas Stawski Feb 25 '13 at 20:12
3  
onUserLeaveHint isn't called when e.g. a phone call comes in and the calling activity becomes active, so this has an edge case as well - there could be other cases too, since you can add a flag to the intent to suppress the onUserLeaveHint call. developer.android.com/reference/android/content/… – Groxx Mar 8 '13 at 23:29
1  
Also, onResume doesn't work well. I tried it and sometimes the onResume is called while the phone is locked. If you see the definition of the onResume in the documentation, you will find: Keep in mind that onResume is not the best indicator that your activity is visible to the user; a system window such as the keyguard may be in front. Use onWindowFocusChanged(boolean) to know for certain that your activity is visible to the user (for example, to resume a game).developer.android.com/reference/android/app/… – J-Rou Apr 9 '13 at 15:49
    
this solution does not help to decide foreground/background if there are multiple activities.Plz refer stackoverflow.com/questions/3667022/… – Raj Trivedi Jul 1 '15 at 6:16

Based on Martín Marconcinis answer (thanks!) I finally found a reliable (and very simple) solution.

public class ApplicationLifecycleHandler implements Application.ActivityLifecycleCallbacks, ComponentCallbacks2 {

    private static final String TAG = ApplicationLifecycleHandler.class.getSimpleName();
    private static boolean isInBackground = false;

    @Override
    public void onActivityCreated(Activity activity, Bundle bundle) {
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityStarted(Activity activity) {
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityResumed(Activity activity) {

        if(isInBackground){
            Log.d(TAG, "app went to foreground");
            isInBackground = false;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityPaused(Activity activity) {
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityStopped(Activity activity) {
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivitySaveInstanceState(Activity activity, Bundle bundle) {
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityDestroyed(Activity activity) {
    }

    @Override
    public void onConfigurationChanged(Configuration configuration) {
    }

    @Override
    public void onLowMemory() {
    }

    @Override
    public void onTrimMemory(int i) {
        if(i == ComponentCallbacks2.TRIM_MEMORY_UI_HIDDEN){
            Log.d(TAG, "app went to background");
            isInBackground = true;
        }
    }
}

Then add this to your onCreate() of your Application class

public class MyApp extends android.app.Application {

    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();

        ApplicationLifeCycleHandler handler = new ApplicationLifeCycleHandler();
        registerActivityLifecycleCallbacks(handler);
        registerComponentCallbacks(handler);

    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Can yo show how you use this in an app, do I call this from App class or somewhere else? – JPM Jul 31 '15 at 21:38
    
this is perfect thank you!! works great in testing so far – aherrick Aug 18 '15 at 14:30
    
This example if incomplete. What is registerActivityLifecycleCallbacks? – Noman Hamid Sep 7 '15 at 10:48
    
its a method in class android.app.Application – rickul Sep 7 '15 at 11:16
    
well done +1 to go on top, because it is perfect, don't look other answers, this is based on @reno answer but with real example – Sniper Jan 29 at 17:50

ActivityLifecycleCallbacks might be of interest, but it isn't well documented.

Though, if you call registerActivityLifecycleCallbacks() you should be able to get callbacks for when Activities are created, destroyed, etc. You can call getComponentName() for the Activity.

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11  
Since api level 14 =\ – imort Nov 29 '11 at 11:55
    
Looks like this one is clean and works for me. Thanks – duanbo1983 Jan 22 '14 at 21:41

Create a class that extends Application, then in it we can use it's override method onTrimMemory()

To detect application went to background, we will use:-

 @Override
    public void onTrimMemory(final int level) {
        if (level == ComponentCallbacks2.TRIM_MEMORY_UI_HIDDEN) {
            // Get called every-time when application went to background.
        }

    }
share|improve this answer

In your Application add the callback and check for root activity in a way like this:

@Override
public void onCreate() {
    super.onCreate();
    registerActivityLifecycleCallbacks(new ActivityLifecycleCallbacks() {
        @Override
        public void onActivityStopped(Activity activity) {
        }

        @Override
        public void onActivityStarted(Activity activity) {
        }

        @Override
        public void onActivitySaveInstanceState(Activity activity, Bundle outState) {
        }

        @Override
        public void onActivityResumed(Activity activity) {
        }

        @Override
        public void onActivityPaused(Activity activity) {
        }

        @Override
        public void onActivityDestroyed(Activity activity) {
        }

        @Override
        public void onActivityCreated(Activity activity, Bundle savedInstanceState) {
            if (activity.isTaskRoot() && !(activity instanceof YourSplashScreenActivity)) {
                Log.e(YourApp.TAG, "Reload defaults on restoring from background.");
                loadDefaults();
            }
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would consider using this manner of implementation. A transition from one activity to another just take a few milliseconds. Based on the time when the last activity disappears can be considered to re-login the user by a specific strategy. – drindt Mar 12 at 12:27

Edit 2: What I've written below will not actually work. Google has rejected an app that includes a call to ActivityManager.getRunningTasks(). From the documentation, it is apparent that this API is for debugging and developement purposes only. I'll be updating this post as soon as I have time to update the github proejct below with a new scheme that uses timers and is almost as good.

Edit 1: I've written up a blog post and created a simple github repo to make this really easy.

The accepted and top rated answer are both not really the best approach. The top rated answer's implementation of isApplicationBroughtToBackground() does not handle the situation where the Application's main Activity is yielding to an Activity that is defined in the same Application, but has a different java package. I came up with a way to do this that will work in that case.

Call this in onPause(), and it will tell you if your Application is going into the background because another Application has started, or the user has pressed the home button.

public static boolean isApplicationBroughtToBackground(final Activity activity) {
  ActivityManager activityManager = (ActivityManager) activity.getSystemService(Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE);
  List<ActivityManager.RunningTaskInfo> tasks = activityManager.getRunningTasks(1);

  // Check the top Activity against the list of Activities contained in the Application's package.
  if (!tasks.isEmpty()) {
    ComponentName topActivity = tasks.get(0).topActivity;
    try {
      PackageInfo pi = activity.getPackageManager().getPackageInfo(activity.getPackageName(), PackageManager.GET_ACTIVITIES);
      for (ActivityInfo activityInfo : pi.activities) {
        if(topActivity.getClassName().equals(activityInfo.name)) {
          return false;
        }
      }
    } catch( PackageManager.NameNotFoundException e) {
      return false; // Never happens.
    }
  }
  return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
FYI, calling this in onStart() instead will avoid it being called when a simple dialog is thrown up from, for example, an alarm going off. – Sky Kelsey Aug 7 '12 at 16:19

My solution was inspired by @d60402's answer and also relies on a time-window, but not using the Timer:

public abstract class BaseActivity extends ActionBarActivity {

  protected boolean wasInBackground = false;

  @Override
  protected void onStart() {
    super.onStart();
    wasInBackground = getApp().isInBackground;
    getApp().isInBackground = false;
    getApp().lastForegroundTransition = System.currentTimeMillis();
  }

  @Override
  protected void onStop() {
    super.onStop();
    if( 1500 < System.currentTimeMillis() - getApp().lastForegroundTransition )
      getApp().isInBackground = true;
  }

  protected SingletonApplication getApp(){
    return (SingletonApplication)getApplication();
  }
}

where the SingletonApplication is an extension of Application class:

public class SingletonApplication extends Application {
  public boolean isInBackground = false;
  public long lastForegroundTransition = 0;
}
share|improve this answer

What I did is make sure that all in-app activities are launched with startActivityForResult then checking if onActivityResult was called before onResume. If it wasn't, it means we just returned from somewhere outside our app.

boolean onActivityResultCalledBeforeOnResume;

@Override
public void startActivity(Intent intent) {
    startActivityForResult(intent, 0);
}

@Override
protected void onActivityResult(int requestCode, int resultCode, Intent intent) {
    super.onActivityResult(requestCode, resultCode, intent);
    onActivityResultCalledBeforeOnResume = true;
}

@Override
protected void onResume() {
    super.onResume();
    if (!onActivityResultCalledBeforeOnResume) {
        // here, app was brought to foreground
    }
    onActivityResultCalledBeforeOnResume = false;
}
share|improve this answer

This is my solution https://github.com/doridori/AndroidUtils/blob/master/App/src/main/java/com/doridori/lib/app/ActivityCounter.java

Basically involved counting the lifecycle methods for all Activity's with a timer to catch cases where there is no activity currently in the foreground but the app is (i.e. on rotation)

share|improve this answer

Was using this with Google Analytics EasyTracker. Works. Could be extended to do what you seek using a simple integer.

public class MainApplication extends Application {

    int isAppBackgrounded = 0;

    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();
        appBackgroundedDetector();
    }

    private void appBackgroundedDetector() {
        registerActivityLifecycleCallbacks(new ActivityLifecycleCallbacks() {
            @Override
            public void onActivityCreated(Activity activity, Bundle bundle) {

            }

            @Override
            public void onActivityStarted(Activity activity) {
                EasyTracker.getInstance(MainApplication.this).activityStart(activity);
            }

            @Override
            public void onActivityResumed(Activity activity) {
                isAppBackgrounded++;
                if (isAppBackgrounded > 0) {
                    // Do something here
                }
            }

            @Override
            public void onActivityPaused(Activity activity) {
                isAppBackgrounded--;
            }

            @Override
            public void onActivityStopped(Activity activity) {
                EasyTracker.getInstance(MainApplication.this).activityStop(activity);
            }

            @Override
            public void onActivitySaveInstanceState(Activity activity, Bundle bundle) {

            }

            @Override
            public void onActivityDestroyed(Activity activity) {

            }
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I have create Project on Github app-foreground-background-listen

Create a BaseActivity for all Activity in your application.

public class BaseActivity extends Activity {

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);
}

public static boolean isAppInFg = false;
public static boolean isScrInFg = false;
public static boolean isChangeScrFg = false;

@Override
protected void onStart() {
if (!isAppInFg) {
    isAppInFg = true;
    isChangeScrFg = false;
    onAppStart();
} else {
    isChangeScrFg = true;
}
isScrInFg = true;

super.onStart();
}

@Override
protected void onStop() {
super.onStop();

if (!isScrInFg || !isChangeScrFg) {
    isAppInFg = false;
    onAppPause();
}
isScrInFg = false;
}


public void onAppStart() {
//remove this toast
Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "App in foreground",    Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
// your code
 }

public void onAppPause() {
//remove this toast
Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "App in background",  Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
// your code
 }
}

Now use this BaseActivity as a super class of all you Activity like MainActivity extends BaseActivity and onAppStart will be called when you starts your app and onAppPause() will be called when app goes background from any screen.

share|improve this answer

I found a good method to detect application whether enter foreground or background. Here is my code. Hope this help you.

/**
 * Custom Application which can detect application state of whether it enter
 * background or enter foreground.
 *
 * @reference http://www.vardhan-justlikethat.blogspot.sg/2014/02/android-solution-to-detect-when-android.html
 */
 public abstract class StatusApplication extends Application implements ActivityLifecycleCallbacks {

public static final int STATE_UNKNOWN = 0x00;
public static final int STATE_CREATED = 0x01;
public static final int STATE_STARTED = 0x02;
public static final int STATE_RESUMED = 0x03;
public static final int STATE_PAUSED = 0x04;
public static final int STATE_STOPPED = 0x05;
public static final int STATE_DESTROYED = 0x06;

private static final int FLAG_STATE_FOREGROUND = -1;
private static final int FLAG_STATE_BACKGROUND = -2;

private int mCurrentState = STATE_UNKNOWN;
private int mStateFlag = FLAG_STATE_BACKGROUND;

@Override
public void onCreate() {
    super.onCreate();
    mCurrentState = STATE_UNKNOWN;
    registerActivityLifecycleCallbacks(this);
}

@Override
public void onActivityCreated(Activity activity, Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    // mCurrentState = STATE_CREATED;
}

@Override
public void onActivityStarted(Activity activity) {
    if (mCurrentState == STATE_UNKNOWN || mCurrentState == STATE_STOPPED) {
        if (mStateFlag == FLAG_STATE_BACKGROUND) {
            applicationWillEnterForeground();
            mStateFlag = FLAG_STATE_FOREGROUND;
        }
    }
    mCurrentState = STATE_STARTED;

}

@Override
public void onActivityResumed(Activity activity) {
    mCurrentState = STATE_RESUMED;

}

@Override
public void onActivityPaused(Activity activity) {
    mCurrentState = STATE_PAUSED;

}

@Override
public void onActivityStopped(Activity activity) {
    mCurrentState = STATE_STOPPED;

}

@Override
public void onActivitySaveInstanceState(Activity activity, Bundle outState) {

}

@Override
public void onActivityDestroyed(Activity activity) {
    mCurrentState = STATE_DESTROYED;
}

@Override
public void onTrimMemory(int level) {
    super.onTrimMemory(level);
    if (mCurrentState == STATE_STOPPED && level >= TRIM_MEMORY_UI_HIDDEN) {
        if (mStateFlag == FLAG_STATE_FOREGROUND) {
            applicationDidEnterBackground();
            mStateFlag = FLAG_STATE_BACKGROUND;
        }
    }else if (mCurrentState == STATE_DESTROYED && level >= TRIM_MEMORY_UI_HIDDEN) {
        if (mStateFlag == FLAG_STATE_FOREGROUND) {
            applicationDidDestroyed();
            mStateFlag = FLAG_STATE_BACKGROUND;
        }
    }
}

/**
 * The method be called when the application been destroyed. But when the
 * device screen off,this method will not invoked.
 */
protected abstract void applicationDidDestroyed();

/**
 * The method be called when the application enter background. But when the
 * device screen off,this method will not invoked.
 */
protected abstract void applicationDidEnterBackground();

/**
 * The method be called when the application enter foreground.
 */
protected abstract void applicationWillEnterForeground();

}

share|improve this answer

Here is my solution. Just register this ActivityLifecycleCallbacks in your main Application class. In the comments, I mention a user profile Activity edge case. That Activity is simply one with transparent edges.

/**
 * This class used Activity lifecycle callbacks to determine when the application goes to the
 * background as well as when it is brought to the foreground.
 */
public class Foreground implements Application.ActivityLifecycleCallbacks
{
    /**
     * How long to wait before checking onStart()/onStop() count to determine if the app has been
     * backgrounded.
     */
    public static final long BACKGROUND_CHECK_DELAY_MS = 500;

    private static Foreground sInstance;

    private final Handler mMainThreadHandler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());
    private boolean mIsForeground = false;
    private int mCount;

    public static void init(final Application application)
    {
        if (sInstance == null)
        {
            sInstance = new Foreground();
            application.registerActivityLifecycleCallbacks(sInstance);
        }
    }

    public static Foreground getInstance()
    {
        return sInstance;
    }

    public boolean isForeground()
    {
        return mIsForeground;
    }

    public boolean isBackground()
    {
        return !mIsForeground;
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityStarted(final Activity activity)
    {
        mCount++;

        // Remove posted Runnables so any Meteor disconnect is cancelled if the user comes back to
        // the app before it runs.
        mMainThreadHandler.removeCallbacksAndMessages(null);

        if (!mIsForeground)
        {
            mIsForeground = true;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityStopped(final Activity activity)
    {
        mCount--;

        // A transparent Activity like community user profile won't stop the Activity that launched
        // it. If you launch another Activity from the user profile or hit the Android home button,
        // there are two onStops(). One for the user profile and one for its parent. Remove any
        // posted Runnables so we don't get two session ended events.
        mMainThreadHandler.removeCallbacksAndMessages(null);
        mMainThreadHandler.postDelayed(new Runnable()
        {
            @Override
            public void run()
            {
                if (mCount == 0)
                {
                    mIsForeground = false;
                }
            }
        }, BACKGROUND_CHECK_DELAY_MS);
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityCreated(final Activity activity, final Bundle savedInstanceState)
    {

    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityResumed(final Activity activity)
    {

    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityPaused(final Activity activity)
    {

    }

    @Override
    public void onActivitySaveInstanceState(final Activity activity, final Bundle outState)
    {

    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityDestroyed(final Activity activity)
    {

    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can use:

protected void onRestart ()

To differ between new starts and restarts.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

My app needs to "reboot" after return from background - show a series of activities, according to client solicitations. After extensive search on how to manage the background/foreground transitions (treated very differently between iOS and Android), I crossed this question. Found very useful help here, specially from the most voted answer and the one flagged as correct. However, simply reinstantiate the root activity EVERY TIME the app enters foreground looked too annoying, when you think about UX. The solution that worked for me, and the one I think's most adequated - based on the Youtube and Twitter apps functionality - was to combine the answers from @GirishNair and @d60402: Calling the timer when the app's trimming memory, as follows:

@Override
public void onTrimMemory(int level) {
    if (stateOfLifeCycle.equals("Stop")) {
        startActivityTransitionTimer();
    }

    super.onTrimMemory(level);
}

My Timer limit is set to 30 seconds - I'm thinking about increasing this a little.

private final long MAX_ACTIVITY_TRANSITION_TIME = 30000;

And when app goes into foreground, is relaunched, or the app's destroyed, call the method to cancel timer.

On App extension:

@Override
public void onActivityCreated(Activity activity, Bundle arg1) {
    stopActivityTransitionTimer();
    stateOfLifeCycle = "Create";
}

@Override
public void onActivityDestroyed(Activity activity) {
    stopActivityTransitionTimer();
    stateOfLifeCycle = "Destroy";
}

On the activity (preferably on a base activity, inherited by the others):

@Override
protected void onStart() {
    super.onStart();
    if (App.wasInBackground) {
        stopActivityTransitionTimer();
    }
}

In my case, when app goes foreground after the max time, a new task is created, so the stopActivityTransitionTimer() is called upon onActivityCreated() or onActivityDestroyed(), in the app extension class - turning unnecessary to call the method in an activity. Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

These answers don't seem to be correct. These methods are also called when another activity starts and ends. What you can do is keep a global flag (yes, globals are bad:) and set this to true each time you start a new activity. Set it to false in the onCreate of each activity. Then, in the onPause you check this flag. If it's false, your app is going into the background, or it's getting killed.

share|improve this answer
    
you are right.. Maintaining flag in a database is not right solution.. – Sandy09 Jul 20 '12 at 11:53
    
I didn't talk about a database... what do you mean? – Joris Weimar Jul 20 '12 at 14:26
    
i'm supporting your answer. even though we can save that flag value in the database while on pause call it is not the good solution.. – Sandy09 Jul 21 '12 at 11:18

I've used this simple solution, I'm not sure it applies for non default launchmodes:

make an helper class

public class Shared
{
    private static Integer sLastActivity = 0;

    private static void setForeground(Activity activity)
    {
        synchronized (sLastActivity)
        {
            sLastActivity = activity.hashCode();
        }
    }

    private static boolean isComingFromBackround(Activity activity)
    {
        synchronized (sLastActivity)
        {
            return (activity.hashCode() == sLastActivity);
        }
    }
}

In each Activity onResume() call setForeground() passing current Activity (this). If you want to known if coming from background, call isComingFromBackround() BEFORE setForeground()

the concept is simple: if you execute twice in a row onResume() within the same Activity then you are coming from background, otherwise you are just returning back from a different Activity

I'm using hashcode() to avoid keeping a reference to a context, synchronized may not be needed

share|improve this answer

I'm using this solution: http://nathanael.hevenet.com/android-dev-detecting-when-your-app-is-in-the-background-across-activities/

In short- Build a dedicate service that every activity report him about each lifecycle event, and this service get the info about the status of the app.

Very much like @oldschool4664 solution, but cleaner in my opinion

share|improve this answer

The principal problem is that you have to get an specific behavior when you start an activity from background. If you override your onPause() and onResume() methods, you'll have a close answer, but not the solution. The problem is that onPause() and onResume() methods are called even if you don't minimize your application, they can be called when you start an activity and later you press the back button to return to your activity. To eliminate that problem and to know really when your application comes from background, you must to get the running process and compare with your process:

private boolean isApplicationBroughtToBackground() {
    ActivityManager am = (ActivityManager) getSystemService(Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE);
    List<RunningTaskInfo> tasks = am.getRunningTasks(1);
    if (!tasks.isEmpty()) {
        ComponentName topActivity = tasks.get(0).topActivity;
        if (!topActivity.getPackageName().equals(getPackageName())) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Now you have to declare a boolean variable:

public boolean wasPaused = false;

And ask when your activity comes to background:

@Override
public void onPause(){
    super.onPause();
    if(isApplicationBroughtToBackground())
        wasPaused = true;
}

Now, when your activity comes to the screen again, ask in onResume() method:

@Override
public void onResume(){
    super.onResume();
    if(wasPaused){
        lockScreen(true);
    }
    wasPaused = false;
}

And this is it. Now, when your activity comes to background, and later the user brings it to foreground, the lock screen will appear.

If you want to repeat this behavior for whatever activity of your app, you have to create an activity (could be BaseActivity), put this methods, and all your activities have to inherit from BaseActivity.

I hope that this help to you.

Greetings!

share|improve this answer
2  
As stated elsewhere on this page, getRunningTasks() is not intended for production code, and apparently, apps have been pulled for using it. – Nate Mar 15 '13 at 2:02

protected by Community Apr 17 '14 at 0:56

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