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I was wondering if there was a way to call classes from inside a class. Like below for example:

$class->subclass->func();

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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You don't call a class. Or a class method. You call an object method. Your syntax is correct. –  Rudie Dec 11 '10 at 0:30
1  
might be nice to mention static methods, though, which are called on a class name, rather than on an object instance, such as: ClassName::MethodCall() –  zanlok Dec 11 '10 at 1:26
    
see also stackoverflow.com/questions/1548286/… –  Alexander Bird May 29 '12 at 16:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Give this a looksee: How to do a PHP nested class or nested methods?

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Thanks, that really helped. –  lolraccoon Dec 11 '10 at 0:29
9  
Wow, does no one know what a nested class is? Neither of these questions have anything to do with nested classes –  B T Dec 14 '11 at 7:39
    
I agree with BT. NO! you cannot do what you asked: PHP does not support nested classes (stackoverflow.com/questions/1548286/…); however, there are functional ways to accomplish what you are wanting including what this answer proposes, but I feel like people need to specifically acknowledge that. –  Alexander Bird May 29 '12 at 16:06

First, let's correct your terminology. You seem to be asking about objects, not classes.

You can assign an object to a property of another object -- but this is wholly separate from inheritance.

So what you wrote is better written:

$object->memberObject->methodOfMemberObject();

Whether or not object and memberObject are related by inheritance is completely irrelevant.

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Also unfortunately not possible:

class Oele {
  function bla() {
    // do stuff here

    class Tiny { // syntax error
      public $name;
      public $age;
      public $etc;
      function __construct( $name, $age, $etc ) {
        $this->name = $name;
        // and so on
      }
      function calculateSomething() {
        // return something usefull
      }
    }

    $something = array(
      new Tiny('bla', 25, null),
      new Tiny('oele', 24, null),
      new Tiny('adoeuf', 41, null)
    );
  }
}

Defining functions within class methods is possible though:

class Oele {
  function bla() {
    $data = ...
    function doSomething($obj) {
      return $obj->some * $obj->thing;
    }
    $data2 = array_map('doSomething', $data);
  }
}
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Since PHP 5.3, doSomething() can be a closure. –  Denis Nikolaenko Sep 28 '11 at 19:15
    
I know, but that would invalidate the entire point: you can define functions within methods. –  Rudie Sep 28 '11 at 21:40

A subclass is just a normal class, so you call it the way you call anything:

 $subclass = new SubClass();

As for your example code:

 $class->subclass->func();

What that looks like to me is that you have an object of some type, which has a public property called "$subclass" which contains another object (presumably of another type). That class property has a public method called func() which you're calling.

We need to be clear on your meaning here, because you might be confused. The word "subclass" has a specific meaning - it means you've defined a class, and want to use that class as a template to create similar class with more functionality.

For example, let's say you have a parent class called ParentClass, which looks like this:

class ParentClass {
  public function sayHello() {
     echo "Hello!";
  }
}

Let's say you wanted another class which does everything that ParentClass does, but also says Goodbye. You could create a ChildClass class by "extending" (i.e. inheriting from) ParentClass:

class ChildClass extends ParentClass {
  public function sayGoodbye() {
     echo "Goodbye!";
  }
}

Because you're inheriting from ParentClass, your gets "everything" (there are restrictions, but let's ignore them for now) from ParentClass and also implements anything it defined as part of ChildClass. So ChildClass ends up looking like this:

child ChildClass {

  public function sayHello() {
     echo "Hello!";
  }

  public function sayGoodbye() {
     echo "Goodbye!";
  }
}

Now, this could be what you mean by "subclass" in your code, but you could easily be just talking about a property.

A property is just a variable stored as part of a particular class. It doesn't have to be an object (i.e. an instance of a particular class). It's simply a normal variable, but defined for use with or within an object of a particular type.

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