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I would like to calculate the color depending on a percentage value:

float percentage = x/total;
int color;
if (percentage >= 0.95) {
  color = Color.GREEN;
} else if (percentage <= 0.5) {
  color = Color.RED;
} else {
  // color = getColor(Color.Green, Color.RED, percentage);
}

How can I calculate that last thing? It would be OK if yellow appears at 50%.

I tried this:

private int getColor(int c0, int c1, float p) {
    int a = ave(Color.alpha(c0), Color.alpha(c1), p);
    int r = ave(Color.red(c0), Color.red(c1), p);
    int g = ave(Color.green(c0), Color.green(c1), p);
    int b = ave(Color.blue(c0), Color.blue(c1), p);
    return Color.argb(a, r, g, b);
}
private int ave(int src, int dst, float p) {
    return src + java.lang.Math.round(p * (dst - src));
}

Well this works, but I would like the colors at around 50% being more lightend as I use them on a grey background.. how can I accomplish that?

Thanks!

UPDATE I tried to convert to YUV like it was suggested in the comments. But I still have the same problem that at 50% it's to dark. Additional in this solution I have at <5% now white as color. If I do not calculate float y = ave(...);, but just take float y = c0.y it's a little better, but at <20% I have then cyan color ... I'm not so much into color-formats :-/ Maybe I'm doing something wrong in the calculation? The constants are taken from Wikipedia

public class ColorUtils {

    private static class Yuv {
        public float y;
        public float u;
        public float v;

        public Yuv(int c) {
            int r = Color.red(c);
            int g = Color.green(c);
            int b = Color.blue(c);
            this.y = 0.299f * r + 0.587f * g + 0.114f * b;
            this.u = (b - y) * 0.493f;
            this.v = (r - y) * 0.877f;
        }
    }

    public static int getColor(int color0, int color1, float p) {
        Yuv c0 = new Yuv(color0);
        Yuv c1 = new Yuv(color1);
        float y = ave(c0.y, c1.y, p);
        float u = ave(c0.u, c1.u, p);
        float v = ave(c0.v, c1.v, p);

        int b = (int) (y + u / 0.493f);
        int r = (int) (y + v / 0.877f);
        int g = (int) (1.7f * y - 0.509f * r - 0.194f * b);

        return Color.rgb(r, g, b);
    }

    private static float ave(float src, float dst, float p) {
        return src + Math.round(p * (dst - src));
    }
}
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1  
Have you considered converting to YUV and comparing luminance values? –  SRM Dec 11 '10 at 2:19
    
yes, I edited it to the question... it's the same problem there –  Stuck Dec 11 '10 at 3:29

5 Answers 5

You can try using ArgbEvaluator class from android API: http://developer.android.com/reference/android/animation/ArgbEvaluator.html :

new ArgbEvaluator().evaluate(0.75, 0x00ff00, 0xff0000);

Note that there is a bug ( http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=36158 ) in alpha channel calculation so you should use values without alpha value.

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Here is a pseudocode function that interpolates linearly between 2 colors (staying in RGB space). I'm using a class called Color here instead of ints for clarity.

bAmount is between 0 and 1 (for interpolation)

Color interpolate(Color colorA, Color colorB, float bAmount) {
    Color colorOut;
    float aAmount = 1.0 - bAmount;
    colorOut.r =  colorA.r * aAmount + colorB.r * bAmount;
    colorOut.g =  colorA.g * aAmount + colorB.g * bAmount;
    colorOut.b =  colorA.b * aAmount + colorB.b * bAmount;
    return colorOut;
}
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1  
He "tried that". –  Scott Rippey Oct 24 '11 at 5:06

My $0.02, I found this answer and coded up the proper solution. (Thanks to Alnitak for the HSV tip!)

For Copy+Paste:

  private float interpolate(float a, float b, float proportion) {
    return (a + ((b - a) * proportion));
  }

  /** Returns an interpoloated color, between <code>a</code> and <code>b</code> */
  private int interpolateColor(int a, int b, float proportion) {
    float[] hsva = new float[3];
    float[] hsvb = new float[3];
    Color.colorToHSV(a, hsva);
    Color.colorToHSV(b, hsvb);
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
      hsvb[i] = interpolate(hsva[i], hsvb[i], proportion);
    }
    return Color.HSVToColor(hsvb);
  }
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Interpolation like this is best done in HSL or HSV color spaces (and not YUV).

The reason the mid range colours look "muddy" is because if you simply linearly ramp up the red (#ff0000) at the same time as ramping down green (#00ff00) the middle colour ends up as #808000 instead of #ffff00.

Instead, find the HSL (or HSV) equivalent of your starting colour, and the same for the end colour. Interpolate in that colour space, and then for each point convert back to RGB again.

Since the S and L (or V) values are the same for fully saturated red and green, only the H (hue) variable will change, giving the proper effect of a spectrum of colour.

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works very well... thank you :) –  mibollma Dec 17 '10 at 0:06
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok, after 2 hours of converting to yuv, hsv, etc pp... I give up. I now do it just like this:

public class ColorUtils {
    private static int FIRST_COLOR = Color.GREEN;
    private static int SECOND_COLOR = Color.YELLOW;
    private static int THIRD_COLOR = Color.RED;

    public static int getColor(float p) {
        int c0;
        int c1;
        if (p <= 0.5f) {
            p *= 2;
            c0 = FIRST_COLOR;
            c1 = SECOND_COLOR;
        } else {
            p = (p - 0.5f) * 2;
            c0 = SECOND_COLOR;
            c1 = THIRD_COLOR;
        }
        int a = ave(Color.alpha(c0), Color.alpha(c1), p);
        int r = ave(Color.red(c0), Color.red(c1), p);
        int g = ave(Color.green(c0), Color.green(c1), p);
        int b = ave(Color.blue(c0), Color.blue(c1), p);
        return Color.argb(a, r, g, b);
    }

    private static int ave(int src, int dst, float p) {
        return src + java.lang.Math.round(p * (dst - src));
    }
}

By explicity using yellow as the middle color, the generated colors are brighter :-)

Anyway.. if someone has a good other solution, I would appreciate it.

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