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I'm still wrapping my head around parsing an XML file. Currently I'm using TBXML to get info from a XML file.

Here's how I got some data from a different XML file:

TBXML        *XML = [[TBXML tbxmlWithURL:[NSURL URLWithString:locationString]] retain];
TBXMLElement *rootXML = XML.rootXMLElement;
TBXMLElement *e = [TBXML childElementNamed:@"Result" parentElement:rootXML];
TBXMLElement *WOEID = [TBXML childElementNamed:@"woeid" parentElement:e];
NSString     *woeid = [TBXML textForElement:WOEID];

It work's fine.

However, now I'm wanting to get the temperature from this example Yahoo RSS XML file.

http://weather.yahooapis.com/forecastrss?w=12700023

I don't know how to access the line that contains the weather. How can I do this using TBXML?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since TBXML only lets you access children, you'll have to walk the tree to find the element(s) you want, basically as you do in your sample code. Generally speaking, you'll need to loop, in case there are multiple children with a given node name. If you only need the first, you can use an if-else statement instead of a loop.

TBXML        *XML = [[TBXML tbxmlWithURL:[NSURL URLWithString:locationString]] retain];
TBXMLElement *rss = XML.rootXMLElement,
             *channel,
             *units,
             *item,
             *condition;
NSString     *temperatureUnits,
             *temperature;

for (channel = [TBXML childElementNamed:@"channel" parentElement:rss];
     channel;
     channel = [TBXML nextSiblingNamed:@"channel" searchFromElement:channel])
{
    for (units = [TBXML childElementNamed:@"units" parentElement:channel];
         units;
         units = [TBXML nextSiblingNamed:@"units" searchFromElement:units]) 
    {
        if ((temperatureUnits = [TBXML valueOfAttributeNamed:@"temperature" forElement:units])) {
            [temperatureUnits retain];
            break;
        }
    }
    for (item = [TBXML childElementNamed:@"item" parentElement:channel];
         item;
         item = [TBXML nextSiblingNamed:@"item" searchFromElement:item]) 
    {
        for (condition = [TBXML childElementNamed:@"yweather:condition" parentElement:item];
            condition;
            condition = [TBXML nextSiblingNamed:@"yweather:condition" searchFromElement:condition])
        {
            temperature = [TBXML valueOfAttributeNamed:@"temp" forElement:condition];
            // do something with the temperature
        }
    }
    [temperatureUnits release];
    temperatureUnits = nil;
}

If you don't want to process the temperatures in the loop, add them to a collection of some sort (probably an NSMutableArray).

share|improve this answer
    
It works, although when calling [temperatureUnits release]; it crashes the app. Perhaps it's nil. I'm starting to think using TBXML was a bad idea, should I have stuck with the default NSXML? – sudo rm -rf Dec 12 '10 at 5:30
1  
Actually, it's because temperatureUnits isn't nil (nil ignores messages). It was late, and I confused myself into thinking temperatureUnits was being looped over. The retain/release of temperatureUnits isn't strictly speaking necessary. I was going in a different direction with it, originally. Fix it by either setting temperatureUnits to nil after release (as in updated answer) or dropping the retain & release. – outis Dec 12 '10 at 11:36
    
I'd go with NSXML because it supports XPath and XQuery, so you can access the nodes you want more or less directly. – outis Dec 12 '10 at 11:39

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