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In my project I have multiple "service" static classes that should be easily accessible across the project, and thus they are static. However, to to initialize them, I have to pass them data that is only available during start-time, which results in code similar to this:

public static class VisualStudioEvents
{
    private static Data _data;

    public static void Initialize(Data data)
    {
        _data = data;
    }

    public static void Func()
    {
        AssertInitialized(_data);

        // Code of actual Func() goes here.
    }
}

What do you think about that? Is there a different design patter that should be applied here? Or is this design acceptable?

Thanks!

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1  
Global state is usually a bad idea. Perhaps rather use dependency injection. –  CodesInChaos Dec 11 '10 at 13:11
    
jalf wrote a nice blog post which is highly relevant to this situation and explains why the Singleton pattern would actually make it worse. –  Ben Voigt Dec 11 '10 at 14:08
1  
@CodeInChaos: Probably the only thing worse than having a global object, is that object being designed around the knowledge that it is global. That's where testability really breaks down. –  Ben Voigt Dec 11 '10 at 14:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'd be pretty comfortable with that. The only change I'd make would be to enforce it as once-only:

    public static void Initialize(Data data)
    {
        if (data == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("data");
        if (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _data, data, null) != null)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Already initialized");
        }
    }

oh -I guess Data should also be immutable to avoid people changing the config unexpectedly.

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+1, I have never seen that Interlocked.CompareExchange before. To MSDN I go! –  Alastair Pitts Dec 11 '10 at 12:29
    
@Alastair - the point being it is thread-safe without requiring a lock –  Marc Gravell Dec 11 '10 at 12:32
    
Very nice thread-safety reminder. Thanks :) –  VitalyB Dec 11 '10 at 14:07

This is probably a good case for a Singleton pattern, you could call initialize in the constructor, with the Data as a class member, throwing an exception if Data is unavailable.

However, the Data in your question is as generic as you could be, so depending on it's purpose/availability there is likely a better way to orchestrate this initialization.

edited

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Slomojo: But... In that case ANYONE who tries to access the instance of the singletone using the GetInstance method will need to pass parameter to it, even if it was already initialized... –  VitalyB Dec 11 '10 at 11:43
    
Sorry, but you haven't supplied enough information about your use case to show that this is an issue. Please expand the details in your question. (e.g. what is this data being sent to initialize) –  Slomojo Dec 11 '10 at 11:52
1  
When it comes test time, you're going to wish it wasn't a singleton. Instantiate it just once, store it in a globally accessible location. No other part of the program will accidentally be making new objects because they don't have the data needed by the constructor. –  Ben Voigt Dec 11 '10 at 13:02
    
Slomojo: No need to apologize :) I am thankful for your input. What I am saying is that part of the reason it is a static object is to ease the access to it from various places in the project. The initialization function, however, is called only once where "Data" is available. If anyone who needs to call a method in this static object would need to pass Data to it, it would make it just more cumbersome. –  VitalyB Dec 11 '10 at 13:27

I would strongly discourage static classes having state, it doesn't differ from global variables, static classes with state just wraps globals into a class. And we all know why globals are bad.

I think you should get some kind of inversion of control solution, that will allow you to get non-static, already initialized instance of your helper class. Your IoC container may use singleton internally to ensure there is single configuration object used.

For example the structure may be:

public class VisualStudioEvents
{
    public VisualStudioEvents(VisualStudioEventsConfig config)
    {
        // ...
    }

    // ...
}

and on application initialization you can create an VisualStudioEventsConfig instance, configure it and add to IoC container as the only instance to be used for the type. Then, every call for VisualStudioEvents instance will be initialized with this prepared configuration instance.

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Interesting. I didn't know about IoC and I was reading now about StructureMap and it was quite interesting. Thanks for the reference, I will consider your solution. –  VitalyB Dec 11 '10 at 14:06
    
I am a bit confused, but isn't in StructureMap, the ObjectFactory by itself is a static class with state? After all, you do need to call ObjectFactory.Initialize function... Perhaps it makes the initialization of ALL services more to be in one place, and yet, it seems very much like a global variable.. –  VitalyB Dec 11 '10 at 14:12
    
I have no experience with StructureMap, but I will be rather comfortable with this global initalization, at least it is not your own global state and you are not intended to use it directly after initialization. But in fact, this is an interesting issue :) –  NOtherDev Dec 11 '10 at 15:16

The name VisualStudioEvents seems to indicate that this class is part of an abstraction between your code and the actual Visual Studio extensions API.

If that is correct, then VisualStudioEvents is something you will want to mock in your unit tests. I wouldn't make this a static class at all. Static methods are death to testability.

edit: as remarked in the comments, the linked blog post is perhaps too radical. Personally I think that static methods are only evil when they contain code that should be part of a component. Putting component code in static methods causes static cling problems with unit testing and dependency injection in general.

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While global state is almost always bad(and the OPs design uses global state), saying that (side effect free) static methods in general are bad is rather controversial, and I for one don't agree with it. –  CodesInChaos Dec 11 '10 at 13:20
    
@CodeInChaos: maybe you are interpreting my answer differently, but I'm not saying that they are bad in general. What I am saying is that static methods are bad if they provide functionality that needs to be mockable in unit tests. –  Wim Coenen Dec 11 '10 at 13:28
    
At least the blog you linked is more radical and argues that basically all static methods are evil. –  CodesInChaos Dec 11 '10 at 13:33
    
@CodeInChaos: Agreed. I've added some nuance. –  Wim Coenen Dec 11 '10 at 14:03

You can try to use the singleton pattern instead of a static class. That would also make it easier to test the code.

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Actually, you should probably just initialize it once, and store it in a global location (i.e. a static member of your application's main class). –  Ben Voigt Dec 11 '10 at 12:59
    
Why is that better? –  Tomas Jansson Dec 11 '10 at 15:09

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