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I'm trying to create my own printf function, but it's not working. The output seems to be the correct format but the parameters aren't getting passed correctly it seems, and I get garbage values. I am using GCC. See the code below.

void con_printf(char *fmt, char attr, ...)
{
    char *s = printf_buffer;
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, fmt);
    vsnprintf(s, CON_TMPSIZE, fmt, args);
    va_end(args);
    while(*s != '\0')
    {
        con_putchr(*s, attr);
        s++;
    }
    con_flush();
}

printf_buffer is defined as CON_TMPSIZE bytes long, which is 128 bytes in this version. This is for a small microcontroller, but I expect the principle applies to any processor.

I am calling it like this:

con_printf("LOOP a %d\n", 0, 10);
con_printf("LOOP b %d\n", 0, 12);

I expect LOOP a 10 to be printed on the first line, and LOOP b 12 on the next, but I get LOOP a 542 and LOOP b 542.

share|improve this question
    
Kindly show us the caller, and the arguments being passed in. – EvilTeach Dec 11 '10 at 15:28
    
@EvilTeach - added caller code – Thomas O Dec 11 '10 at 15:32
up vote 4 down vote accepted

With va_start you specify, at which point the variable arguments start.

Since your function's variable argument list starts after attr, you'll need to:

va_start(args, attr);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion but it is still not working. The output has not changed from what it used to be. – Thomas O Dec 11 '10 at 15:33
    
Hmm. I fired up my virtual machine, ran that code and it gave me the expected results. What machine is your code compiling on? – Linus Kleen Dec 11 '10 at 15:53
    
It is running on a microcontroller, a dsPIC33FJ128GP802. – Thomas O Dec 11 '10 at 15:56
    
Well Thomas, could you try and switch the functions arguments (i.e. attr first, then fmt) and try again. If there's no change, I'm as lost as you... – Linus Kleen Dec 11 '10 at 16:21

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