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To launch programs from my Python-scripts, I'm using the following method:

def execute(command):
    process = subprocess.Popen(command, shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
    output = process.communicate()[0]
    exitCode = process.returncode

    if (exitCode == 0):
        return output
    else:
        raise ProcessException(command, exitCode, output)

So when i launch a process like Process.execute("mvn clean install"), my program waits until the the process is finished, and only then i get the complete output of my program. This is annoying if i'm running a process that takes a while to finish.

Can i let my program write the process output line by line, by polling the process output before it finishes in a loop or something?

*[EDIT] Sorry i didn't search very well before posting this question. Threading is actually the key. Found an example here which shows how to do it: * Python Subprocess.Popen from a thread

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Thread instead of subprocess, i think –  Ant Dec 11 '10 at 16:12
2  
No, you don't need threads. The entire piping idea works because you can get read/write from processes while they are running. –  tokland Aug 10 '13 at 7:01
    

5 Answers 5

There is a pretty common pattern using iter:

import subprocess

def execute(command):    
    popen = subprocess.Popen(command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
    lines_iterator = iter(popen.stdout.readline, b"")
    for line in lines_iterator:
        print(line) # yield line

execute(["locate", "a"])
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this is not what he was asking for. you're just printig the output line by line...this doesn't make sense –  Ant Dec 11 '10 at 16:48
1  
@ant: isn't printing the output line by line with the OP asked for? –  tokland Sep 30 '12 at 12:14
4  
I've tried this code (with a program that takes significant time to run) and can confirm it outputs lines as they're received, rather than waiting for execution to complete. This is the superior answer imo. –  Andrew Martin May 13 '14 at 18:08
2  
Note: In Python 3, you could use for line in popen.stdout: print(line.decode(), end=''). To support both Python 2 and 3, use bytes literal: b'' otherwise lines_iterator never ends on Python 3. –  J.F. Sebastian Feb 3 at 17:05
    
Using b"", now it works for py2 and 3. –  tokland Feb 3 at 20:14
up vote 26 down vote accepted

Ok i managed to solve it without threads (any suggestions why using threads would be better are appreciated) by using a snippet from this question Intercepting stdout of a subprocess while it is running

def execute(command):
    process = subprocess.Popen(command, shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)

    # Poll process for new output until finished
    while True:
        nextline = process.stdout.readline()
        if nextline == '' and process.poll() != None:
            break
        sys.stdout.write(nextline)
        sys.stdout.flush()

    output = process.communicate()[0]
    exitCode = process.returncode

    if (exitCode == 0):
        return output
    else:
        raise ProcessException(command, exitCode, output)
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4  
did you try my code? because that's exactly what it does... –  tokland Dec 11 '10 at 19:02
1  
Merging the ifischer's and tokland's code works quite well (I had to change print line, to sys.stdout.write(nextline); sys.stdout.flush(). Otherwise, it would print out every two lines. Then again, this is using IPython's Notebook interface, so maybe something else was happening - regardless, explicitly calling flush() works. –  eacousineau Oct 14 '12 at 3:17
1  
mister you're my life saver!! really strange that this kind of things are not build-in in library itself.. cause if I write cliapp, i want to show everything what's processing in loop instantly.. s'rsly.. –  holms Mar 23 '13 at 1:05
    
Can this solution be modified to constantly print both output and errors? If I change stderr=subprocess.STDOUT to stderr=subprocess.PIPE and then call process.stderr.readline() from within the loop, I seem to run afoul of the very deadlock that is warned about in the documentation for the subprocess module. –  David Charles Dec 16 '13 at 20:04
1  
@DavidCharles I think what you're looking for is stdout=subprocess.PIPE,stderr=subprocess.STDOUT this captures stderr, and I believe (but I've not tested) that it also captures stdin. –  Andrew Martin May 13 '14 at 18:11

@tokland

tried your code and corrected it for 3.4 and windows dir.cmd is a simple dir command, saved as cmd-file

    import subprocess
    c = "dir.cmd"

    def execute(command):    
        popen = subprocess.Popen(command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE,bufsize=1)
        lines_iterator = iter(popen.stdout.readline, b"")
        while popen.poll() is None:
            for line in lines_iterator:
                nline = line.rstrip()
                print(nline.decode("latin"), end = "\r\n",flush =True) # yield line

    execute(c)    
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1  
you could simplify your code. iter() and end='\r\n' are unnecessary. Python uses universal newlines mode by default i.e., any '\n' is translated to '\r\n' during printing. 'latin' is probably a wrong encoding, you could use universal_newlines=True to get text output in Python 3 (decoded using locale's preferred encoding). Don't stop on .poll(), there could be buffered unread data. If Python script is running in a console then its output is line-buffered; you can force line-buffering using -u option -- you don't need flush=True here. –  J.F. Sebastian Feb 4 at 10:40

To print subprocess' output line-by-line as soon as its stdout buffer is flushed in Python 3:

from subprocess import Popen, PIPE

with Popen(cmd, stdout=PIPE, bufsize=1, universal_newlines=True) as p:
    for line in p.stdout:
        print(line, end='')

Notice: you do not need p.poll() -- the loop ends when eof is reached. And you do not need iter(p.stdout.readline, '') -- the read-ahead bug is fixed in Python 3.

See also, Python: read streaming input from subprocess.communicate().

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For anyone trying the answers to this question to get the stdout from a Python script note that Python buffers its stdout, and therefore it may take a while to see the stdout.

This can be rectified by adding the following after each stdout write in the target script:

sys.stdout.flush()
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