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Here is a little program I wrote to measure the speed of a function that, for various reasons, is important to me:

import time,sys

count = 10 * 1000 * 1000
t1 = time.time()

d = dict()
for i in xrange(0,count):
    d[i] = i
for i in xrange(0,count):
    d[i] = d[i]*i
for i in xrange(0,count):
    d[i] = d[i]-i
t2 = time.time()

print("time=%f" % (t2-t1))
print("size of dictionary: %d" % sys.getsizeof(d))

So I ran this in Python2.7 on my mac and got:

$ python2.7 pyspeed.py
time= 7.24679493904
size of dictionary: 402653464
$ python2.7 pyspeed.py
time= 7.23868012428
size of dictionary: 402653464
$ python2.7 pyspeed.py
time= 7.26046490669
size of dictionary: 402653464

Now when I tried to run it in Python3.1 it didn't work, of course, because xrange has been depreciated. All the documentation I've read says that range now works as xrange did. So here's the rewritten program:

import time,sys

count = 10 * 1000 * 1000
t1 = time.time()

d = dict()
for i in range(0,count):
    d[i] = i
for i in range(0,count):
    d[i] = d[i]*i
for i in range(0,count):
    d[i] = d[i]-i
t2 = time.time()

print("time=%f" % (t2-t1))
print("size of dictionary: %d" % sys.getsizeof(d))

And the Python3.1 performance:

$ python3.1 pyspeed.py
time=7.869891
size of dictionary: 402653464
$ python3.1 pyspeed.py
time=7.849537
size of dictionary: 402653464
$ python3.1 pyspeed.py
time=7.879416
size of dictionary: 402653464

Which is slower by 7%.

Just for a hunch, I tried running the program with range instead of xrange under Python2.7 and got nearly identical results:

$ python2.7 pyspeed.py
time=7.735200
size of dictionary: 402653464
$ python2.7 pyspeed.py
time=7.743711
size of dictionary: 402653464
$ python2.7 pyspeed.py
time=7.762192
size of dictionary: 402653464

Which is still better than Python3.1, but not quite as good as 2.7 with xrange.

It looks to me like:

  1. Python3.1 is still significantly slower than Python2. Why is it not faster?
  2. Despite what the documentation claims, range() in Python3 doesn't work the way xrange() did in Python2 (at least performance wise), it works the way range() did.

Am I missing something here? Or is it time to start giving up on Python?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Abizern, user225312, duffymo, Gabi Purcaru, AndiDog Dec 11 '10 at 17:27

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Yes, time to give up on Python. Was there a specific promise to improve performance for looping using range that has been broken? It seems like a small reason for giving up on a language, like dropping a woman whose shoes didn't please you. –  duffymo Dec 11 '10 at 16:58
2  
You should use the timeit module to time code in Python. –  robert Dec 11 '10 at 17:04
9  
micro benchmark slower by 7%? Cry me a river! –  David Heffernan Dec 11 '10 at 17:05
1  
Comparisons of dis.dis() output may be enlightening (and may lead to a bug report that you could file). –  Zack Dec 11 '10 at 17:12
2  
Also, this benchmark is 1. extremely contrived (even more than the average benchmark) and 2. bad code anyway (try {i: (i * i - i) for i in range(count)}). –  delnan Dec 11 '10 at 17:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1. Performance, python doc: '''The net result of the 3.0 generalizations is that Python 3.0 runs the pystone benchmark around 10% slower than Python 2.5. Most likely the biggest cause is the removal of special-casing for small integers. There’s room for improvement, but it will happen after 3.0 is released!'''

2.the main difference beetween range and xrange is that the second one yield a generator. and range yield a generators too, in python 3.x... there is no difference

share|improve this answer
    
That's not a generator, it's a list comprehension. Conceptually closely related, but gives very different results (and also implemented differently/more efficiently) in Python 2.x IIRC) –  delnan Dec 11 '10 at 17:27
    
thanks for pointing it out. i edited, but in the while the answer had been closed... lol ;) –  Ant Dec 11 '10 at 17:42

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