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I am trying to use SMO in a Windows Forms application to restore a SQL Server database. My form has a Button (button1) and a TextBox (textBox1). When the button is clicked a function is called that checks if the SQL Server instance is started. If it is not started, I start the instance and perform restore. This works, but the form is not responsive while the function is executed. Here is my code:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common;
using Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo;
using Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Wmi;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication7
{    

    delegate void RestoreDatabaseDelegate();

    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            BeginInvoke(
                new RestoreDatabaseDelegate(RestoreDatabase));
        }

        private void RestoreDatabase()
        {
            //textBox1.Text = "";

            try
            {
                Restore dbRestore = new Restore();
                dbRestore.Database = "Sandbox";
                dbRestore.Devices.Add(
                    new BackupDeviceItem(
                        @"C:\scripts\sandbox.bak", DeviceType.File));

                Service service =
                    new ManagedComputer().Services["MSSQL$SQLEXPRESS2008"];

                if (service.ServiceState == ServiceState.Stopped)
                {
                    service.Start();
                }

                ServerConnection connection =
                    new ServerConnection(@"TEST\SQLEXPRESS2008");
                connection.LoginSecure = true;

                Server server = new Server(connection);
                Database db = server.Databases[dbRestore.Database];

                dbRestore.ReplaceDatabase = true;
                dbRestore.Complete +=
                    new ServerMessageEventHandler(RestoreComplete);
                dbRestore.Information +=
                    new ServerMessageEventHandler(RestoreInformation);

                dbRestore.SqlRestoreAsync(server);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                /*textBox1.Text +=
                    (ex.Message + Environment.NewLine);*/
            }
        }

        private void RestoreComplete(
            object sender, ServerMessageEventArgs e)
        {
            /*textBox1.Text += 
                (e.Error.Message + Environment.NewLine);*/
        }

        private void RestoreInformation(
            object sender, ServerMessageEventArgs e)
        {
            /*textBox1.Text += 
                (e.Error.Message + Environment.NewLine);*/
        }
    }
}

Is there a way to keep the form responsive while restore (and SQL Server instance starting) is in progress? What am I doing wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The UI cannot pump windows messages (so will appear unresponsive) if the UI thread is blocked. Instead, look at BackgroundWorker, which allows to to easily push longer-running tasks onto a worker thread (but still push updates to the UI).

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I think he's done so by using SqlRestoreAsync –  Jani Dec 11 '10 at 19:25
    
SqlRestoreAsync Performs a restore operation asynchronously msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Jani Dec 11 '10 at 19:35
    
@Jani It's not very asynchronous is it blocks ;-) But in more seriousness, there may be another part of the function (service starting, for instance) that blocks, even if SqlRestoreAsync doesn't. –  user166390 Dec 11 '10 at 19:39
    
Finding root cause may enlighten us more than finding a workaround, I think calling SqlRestoreAsync either blocks the main thread. but why? –  Jani Dec 11 '10 at 19:49
    
That worked, thanks. –  Uros Calakovic Dec 11 '10 at 20:05
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Have a look at the BackgroundWorker class. It will allow you to perform a long running operation on another thread whist not blocking up the UI thread.

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AFAIR there is a method like ProcessMessages in Application class that you can use to process the messages to your window when the Owner Process of your App doesn't respond well even though you do sth on another thread and having nothing to do with Main Thread.

Wait for more

Yes it's Application.DoEvents();

Boosting your process or Main Thread (UI owner) may be helpful.

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