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What I'm trying to do to design a vertical CSS menu like this one . on the right of this site
alt text

. I've two problems .

  1. How can I add an image in the menu item .

  2. How can I MAKE the BORDER RADIUS of all the item on the top and on the bottom NOT for each one .

That's my code

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html lang="en">
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <title>CSS3 Buttons</title>
    <style>


    .button {
     width: 400px;
     height: 100px;
     line-height: 100px;
     color: #C0C0C0; 
     text-decoration: none;
     font-size: 50px;
     font-family: helvetica, arial;
     font-weight: bold;
     display: block;
     text-align: center;
     position: relative;
     padding-bottom:1px;

     /* BACKGROUND GRADIENTS */
     background: #F5F3F4;



     /* BORDER RADIUS */
     /* -moz-border-radius: 10px;
     -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
     border-radius: 10px; */


     /* TEXT SHADOW */

     text-shadow: 1px 1px 1px black;

     /* BOX SHADOW */
     -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 3px black;
     -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 3px black;
     box-shadow: 0 1px 3px black;
    }

    /* WHILE HOVERED */
    .button:hover {
         color: #A8A8A8;
        -moz-box-shadow: 0 2px 6px black;
        -webkit-box-shadow: 0 2px 6px black;

    }

    /* WHILE BEING CLICKED */
    .button:active {
        -moz-box-shadow: 0 2px 6px black;
        -webkit-box-shadow: 0 2px 6px black;
    }


    </style>
</head>
<body>
     <a href="#" class="button"> Profile  </a>
     <a href="#" class="button">  Privacy </a>
     <a href="#" class="button"> Services </a>
     <a href="#" class="button"> Avatar </a>
     <a href="#" class="button"> Language </a>
</body>
</html> 
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First, you should adjust your html to include a list as follows (notice I also added id attributes):

<ul>
 <li><a href="#" class="button" id="profile-btn"> Profile  </a></li>
 <li><a href="#" class="button" id="privacy-btn">  Privacy </a></li>
 <li><a href="#" class="button" id="services-btn"> Services </a></li>
 <li><a href="#" class="button" id="avatar-btn"> Avatar </a></li>
 <li><a href="#" class="button" id="language-btn"> Language </a></li>
</ul>

Then, to add the image use the following css:

 a#profile-btn {
   background-image:url(/image_path/profile.png);
 }
 a#privacy-btn {
   background-image:url(/image_path/privacy.png);
 }
 a#services-btn {
   background-image:url(/image_path/services.png);
 }
 a#avatar-btn {
   background-image:url(/image_path/avatar.png);
 }
 a#language-btn {
   background-image:url(/image_path/language.png);
 }

And finally the rounded borders:

ul {list-style:none;}
ul li:first-child a {
  -moz-border-radius-topleft: 25px;
  -moz-border-radius-topright: 25px;
  -webkit-border-radius-topleft:25px;
  -webkit-border-radius-topright:25px;
  border-top-right-radius:25px;
  border-top-left-radius:25px;
 }
 ul li:last-child a {
   -moz-border-radius-bottomleft: 25px;
   -moz-border-radius-bottomright: 25px;
   -webkit-border-radius-bottomleft:25px;
   -webkit-border-radius-bottomright:25px;
   border-bottom-right-radius:25px;
   border-bottom-left-radius:25px;
 }

EDIT: This code is intended to work with all your other provided css, as long as you replace the HTML as shown.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you , that's work fine . –  Maged Dec 12 '10 at 22:07

Using pseudo classes like so: (If your nav is a list and the button class is on the list element)

li.button:first-child { -moz-border-radius: 4em 4em 0 0; border-radius: 4em 4em 0 0; }

li.button:last-child { -moz-border-radius: 0 0 4em 4em; border-radius: 0 0 4em 4em; }

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't solve the first part of his question, though. –  LittleTreeX Dec 11 '10 at 23:01

Use lists for that:

<ul id="main-menu">
    <li><a href="" title="">Link 1</a></li>
    <li><a href="" title="">Link 2</a></li>
    <li><a href="" title="">Link 3</a></li>
</ul> 

And the CSS:

ul li {
    float: left;
    display: inline; 
    text-decoration: none;
    font-size: 20px;
    font-family: helvetica, arial;
    font-weight: bold;
    display: block;
    text-align: center;
    position: relative;
    margin: 0 0 0 30px;
    background: #F5F3F4;
    -moz-border-radius: 10px 10px 0 0; /* 10 top left, 10 top right. 0 for the rest */
    -webkit-border-top-radius: 10px; /* This will select only the top part */
    border-radius: 10px 10px 0 0;
    text-shadow: 1px 1px 1px black;
    -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 3px black;
    -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 3px black;
    box-shadow: 0 1px 3px black;
    padding: 15px 30px;
}

ul li a { color: #C0C0C0; text-decoration: none; }

Hope you get the point. You can have a preview here: http://www.jsfiddle.net/UtNA8/

share|improve this answer
    
Your preview doesn't have any code... nothing to preview. –  Hristo Dec 11 '10 at 22:11
    
Sorry, I edited. It works now. –  Vlad.P Dec 11 '10 at 22:44
    
I think he wants the curved border on the top of the first li element, and the bottom of the last li. Not a curved upper border on each of the li elements. –  David Thomas Dec 11 '10 at 22:49
1  
This code will not work. You are applying the borders to every li element. –  LittleTreeX Dec 11 '10 at 23:00
    
Use li:first-child and li:last-child –  Vlad.P Dec 11 '10 at 23:23

You could use a containing element for the links, ideally one that can apply a semantic relationship to its contents, I've used a ul (since it's basically a non-ordered list) and style that, rather than trying to style specific instances of an otherwise non-grouped set of elements:

html

<ul>
    <li><a href="#" class="button"> Profile  </a></li>
     <li><a href="#" class="button">  Privacy </a></li>
     <li><a href="#" class="button"> Services </a></li>
     <li><a href="#" class="button"> Avatar </a></li>
     <li><a href="#" class="button"> Language </a></li>
</ul>

css

ul {
    width: 12em;
    border-radius: 1em;
    overflow: hidden;
}
ul li {
    padding: 0.5em;
    background-color: #eee;
}

JS Fiddle demo.

If you're targeting browsers with reliable implementations of last-child you could also use the :first-child and :last-child pseudo elements:

css:

ul li {
    width: 12em;
    padding: 0.5em;
    background-color: #eee;
}
ul li:first-child {
    -webkit-border-top-radius: 1em;
    -moz-border-radius: 1em 1em 0 0;
    border-radius: 1em 1em 0 0;
}
ul li:last-child {
    -webkit-border-bottom-radius: 1em;
    -moz-border-radius: 0 0 1em 1em;
    border-radius: 0 0 1em 1em;
}

JS Fiddle demo

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot , but This doesn't solve the first part of his question, the main part –  Maged Dec 12 '10 at 19:31

I'd be wary of first-child, last-child pseudo selectors. Obviously they are great ideas, and you should use them because they're a part of the standard, but at the same time you'll need to make some allowances for browsers that don't properly adhere to standards - ahem MS. Same goes for the border-radius properties obviously. Oh and finally, you might want to include your icon graphics as tags inside of your links (that is, if you want them to show up on any browser that doesn't support css properly, and you feel their content is of particular note).

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, but he wanted rounded borders specifically, which already is not a cross browser attribute. Thus, using the first-child, last-child to display this property is perfectly acceptable. In other words, the only browsers that will understand the rounded borders, will also understand the first-child, last-child. –  LittleTreeX Dec 22 '10 at 18:37

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