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$val1 = false;
$val2 = 10;

$variable = $val1 || $val2;

the code above makes $variable = true.

Is there any operator in PHP that would make $variable take the value of $val2, if $val1 is false? I thought || would do this, but it only returns true if any of the values are true, or false if both are false...

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The ternary operator

$variable = ($val1) ? $val1 : $val2;

or (in PHP 5.3+ )

$variable = ($val1) ?: $val2;
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1  
You should mention that the second possibility is only available in PHP >= 5.3. –  Felix Kling Dec 11 '10 at 21:03
    
(+1) I was typing an answer, then I saw yours show up. I wasn't aware of the second syntax! –  ClosureCowboy Dec 11 '10 at 21:03
    
@Felix, thats what I wanted to do originally, and the reason I put the longer version first :) Fixed, cheers. –  code_burgar Dec 11 '10 at 21:06
    
tx. can this also check more than 2 values? like $var = $a || $b || c ... ? –  Alex Dec 11 '10 at 21:06
    
@Alex: affraid not, at this time. –  code_burgar Dec 11 '10 at 21:13

The operator || does a logical or, that's why you only get true or false back.

You might want to use PHP ternary operator:

$variable = $val1? "default value" : $val2;
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You can also absue operator precedence:

$variable = $value1  or  $variable = "value2";

or is weaker than =. It gets more readable if you add extra spaces. But it's more or less a workaround for the lack of ?: in PHP<5.3.

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interesting, this one works with multiple values like $var = $a or $var = $b or .... –  Alex Dec 11 '10 at 21:28

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