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I try to write a parser in scala using Parser Combinators. If I match recursively,

def body: Parser[Body] =
("begin" ~> statementList  )  ^^ {
     case s => {   new Body(s); }
}

def statementList : Parser[List[Statement]] = 
  ("end" ^^ { _ => List() } )|
  (statement ~ statementList ^^ { case statement ~ statementList => statement :: statementList  })

then I get good errormessages whenever there is a fault in a statement. However, this is ugly long code. So I'd like to write this:

def body: Parser[Body] =
("begin" ~> statementList <~ "end"  )  ^^ {
   case s => {   new Body(s); }
}

def statementList : Parser[List[Statement]] = 
    rep(statement)

This code works, but only prints meaningful messages if there is an error in the FIRST statement. If it is in a later statement, the message becomes painfully unusable, because the parser wants to see the whole erroneous statement replaced by the "end" token:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.RuntimeException: [4.2] error: "end" expected but "let" found

 let b : string = x(3,b,"WHAT???",!ERRORHERE!,7 ) 

 ^ 

My question: is there a way to get rep and repsep working in combination with meaningful error messages, that place the caret on the right place instead of on the begin of the repeating fragment?

share|improve this question

You can do it by combining a "home made" rep method with non-backtracking inside statements. For example:

scala> object X extends RegexParsers {
     |   def myrep[T](p: => Parser[T]): Parser[List[T]] = p ~! myrep(p) ^^ { case x ~ xs => x :: xs } | success(List())
     |   def t1 = "this" ~ "is" ~ "war"
     |   def t2 = "this" ~! "is" ~ "war"
     |   def t3 = "begin" ~ rep(t1) ~ "end"
     |   def t4 = "begin" ~ myrep(t2) ~ "end"
     | }
defined module X

scala> X.parse(X.t4, "begin this is war this is hell end")
res13: X.ParseResult[X.~[X.~[String,List[X.~[X.~[String,String],String]]],String]] =
[1.27] error: `war' expected but ` ' found

begin this is war this is hell end
                          ^

scala> X.parse(X.t3, "begin this is war this is hell end")
res14: X.ParseResult[X.~[X.~[String,List[X.~[X.~[String,String],String]]],String]] =
[1.19] failure: `end' expected but ` ' found

begin this is war this is hell end
                  ^
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Daniel. As of scala 2.11, is your answer still the same? Or have PCs been enhanced to provide native, better error messages? – Kevin Meredith Jun 25 '14 at 0:30
    
@KevinMeredith I don't know, but I doubt it. – Daniel C. Sobral Jun 26 '14 at 5:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ah, found the solution! It turns out that you need to use the function phrase on your main parser to return a new parser that is less inclined to track back. (I wonder what it exactly means, perhaps that if it finds a line break it will not track back?) tracks the last position on wich an failure occured.

changed:

def parseCode(code: String): Program = {
 program(new lexical.Scanner(code)) match {
      case Success(program, _) => program
      case x: Failure => throw new RuntimeException(x.toString())
      case x: Error => throw new RuntimeException(x.toString())
  }

}

def program : Parser[Program] ...

into:

def parseCode(code: String): Program = {
 phrase(program)(new lexical.Scanner(code)) match {
      case Success(program, _) => program
      case x: Failure => throw new RuntimeException(x.toString())
      case x: Error => throw new RuntimeException(x.toString())
  }

}


def program : Parser[Program] ...
share|improve this answer
1  
phrase returns a Parser than will only succeed if there's no input left after it accepts something. I have no idea why that would change the backtracking this way, though. – Daniel C. Sobral Dec 11 '10 at 23:43
    
It turns out that it does not change the backtracking at all, but phrase has a little bit of state to check the failure that had the longest match result. It is described in a paragraph called "Error Reporting" in the chapter on parsers in Odersky's book. – Jan Dec 15 '10 at 11:56

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