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I have the following code to read in from a file

#include <queue>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
main(int argc,char * argv[])
{
   ifstream myFile(argv[1]);
   queue<String> myQueue;
   if(myFile.is_open())
      {
         while(...
         ///my read here
      }
}

I have input file like this

1234 345
A 2 234
B 2 345
C 3 345

I want to do the equivalent of this in the read loop

myQueue.push("1234");
myQueue.push("345");
myQueue.push("A");
myQueue.push("2");
myQueue.push("234");
myQueue.push("B");
...

Whats the best way to do this?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted
string input;
myFile >> input;
myQueue.push(input);

Untested but I believe it works.

By the way, if you want to parse the whole file:

while(myFile>>input)

Thanks to rubenvb for reminding me

share|improve this answer
    
but i thought myFile >> input would put the whole line into input "A 2 234" for example? I want to dilimite my input at a space or return character. – kralco626 Dec 11 '10 at 21:56
2  
ifstream consumes all whitespace before reading the value. To read a whole line you would use something like getline(myFile, input) – Francisco P. Dec 11 '10 at 21:59
    
oh, didn't know that. thanks! I'm trying it out now – kralco626 Dec 11 '10 at 22:11
3  
You should not check for eof(), but instead check the extraction directly: while( myFile >> input ) This catches all read errors. (it uses the implicit conversion to bool that every C++ stream supports.) You can do the same thing with getline: while geline(myFile, input) ) – rubenvb Dec 11 '10 at 22:32
    
Yes, that's smarter. Typo on getline! – Francisco P. Dec 11 '10 at 22:35
#include <queue>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc,char * argv[])
{
   if (argc < 2)
   {
      return -1;
   }

   ifstream myFile(argv[1]);

   queue<string> myQueue;
   string input;
   while(myFile >> input)
   {
         myQueue.push(input);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is essentially what I ended up doing, great answer! – kralco626 Dec 11 '10 at 23:40
    
Don't use braces if you don't have a code block. – Renato Rodrigues Dec 11 '10 at 23:41
3  
My advice: Follow the coding style of the surrounding code. Be consistent for the sake of the person who will read it after you :). Personally I use braces generously. I believe they can prevent you from writing really hard to find bugs. – Sanjit Saluja Dec 11 '10 at 23:43
1  
Use braces at all times so when the code needs to increase in complexity, readability doesn't suffer and so the person to follow you doesn't have to add them after the fact. – Tegeril Feb 22 '12 at 2:06

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