Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I'm just getting started with Lua. In the example I'm learning from (the Ghosts & Monsters Corona open source), I see this pattern repeatedly.

local director = require("director")

local mainGroup = display.newGroup()

local function main()

   mainGroup:insert(director.directorView)

   openfeint = require ("openfeint")
   openfeint.init( "App Key Here", "App Secret Here", "Ghosts vs. Monsters", "App ID Here" )

   director:changeScene( "loadmainmenu" )

   return true
end

main()

Is this some sort of convention experienced Lua programmers recommend or are there genuine advantages to doing it this way? Why wouldn't you just skip the function all together and do this:

local director = require("director")

local mainGroup = display.newGroup()

mainGroup:insert(director.directorView)

local openfeint = require ("openfeint")
openfeint.init( "App Key Here", "App Secret Here", "Ghosts vs. Monsters", "App ID Here" )

director:changeScene( "loadmainmenu" )

Is there some implicit benefit to the first style over the second? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure you've simplified it properly? Could you link to some of these examples in their full form? – Amber Dec 11 '10 at 22:51
1  
Yeah, the 'pattern' you've posted seems utterly pointless. You say you see that "a lot", can you link to an example? – Mud Dec 12 '10 at 1:38
    
I've edited the question with a more complete example and cited where you could download the complete source archive. If Lua is like other languages I know, it seems like the 2nd form does more with less. – Jeffrey D. Hoffman Dec 12 '10 at 4:33
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Is this some sort of convention experienced Lua programmers recommend or are there genuine advantages to doing it this way?

It's not typical. The advantage is that object state is private, but that's not enough of an advantage to recommend it.

I see this pattern repeatedly.

I've never seen it before, and it happens only once in the source you posted.

EDIT: Adding a response to a question asked in the comments below this post.

A function which accesses external local variables binds to those variables and is called a 'closure'. Lua (for historical reasons) refers to those bound variables as 'upvalues'. For example:

local function counter()
   local i = 1
   return function()
      print(i)
      i = i + 1
   end
end

local a, b = counter(), counter()
a() a() a() b() --> 1 2 3 1

a and b are closures bound to different copies of i, as you can see from the output. In other words, you can think of a closure as function with it's own private state. You can use this to simulate objects:

function Point(x,y)
   local p = {}
   function p.getX() -- syntax sugar for p.getX = function()
      return x
   end
   function p.setX(x_)
      x = x_
   end
   -- for brevity, not implementing a setter/getter for y
   return p
end

p1 = Point(10,20)
p1.setX(50)
print(p1.getX())

Point returns a table of closures, each bound to the locals x and y. The table doesn't contain the point's state, the closures themselves do, via their upvalues. An important point is that each time Point is called it creates new closures, which is not very efficient if you have large quantities of objects.

Another way of creating classes in Lua is to create functions that take a table as the first argument, with state being stored in the table:

function Point(x,y)
   local p = {x=x,y=y}
   function p:getX() -- syntax sugar for p.getX = function(self)
      return self.x
   end
   function p:setX(x)
      self.x = x
   end
   return p
end

p1 = Point(10,20)
p1:setX(50) -- syntax sugar for p1.setX(p1, 50)
print(p1:getX()) -- syntax sugar for p1.getX(p1)

So far, we're still creating new copies of each method, but now that we're not relying on upvalues for state, we can fix that:

PointClass = {}
function PointClass:getX() return self.x end
function PointClass:setX(x) self.x = x end
function Point(x,y)
   return {
      x = x,
      y = y,
      getX = PointClass.getX,
      setX = PointClass.getY,
   }
end

Now the methods are created once, and all Point instances share the same closures. An even better way of doing this is to use Lua's metaprogramming facility to make new Point instances automatically look in PointClass for methods not found in the instance itself:

PointClass = {}
PointClass.__index = PointClass -- metamethod
function PointClass:getX() return self.x end
function PointClass:setX(x) self.x = x end
function Point(x,y)
   return setmetatable({x=x,y=y}, PointClass)
end

p1 = Point(10,20)
-- the p1 table does not itself contain a setX member, but p1 has a metatable, so 
-- when an indexing operation fails, Lua will look in the metatable for an __index
-- metamethod. If that metamethod is a table, Lua will look for getX in that table,
-- resolving p1.setX to PointClass.setX.
p1:setX(50)

This is a more idiomatic way of creating classes in Lua. It's more memory efficient and more flexible (in particular, it makes it easy to implement inheritance).

share|improve this answer
    
Mud, it appears once in that particular file (main.lua) but the author uses the pattern throughout the code. Many of the files in the archive (level*.lua, load*.lua, ) make use of this pattern. That said, director.lua which is included in the archive but was written by a different author doesn't seem to have the pattern - which leads me to believe it's the Ghosts & Monster's author person style. – Jeffrey D. Hoffman Dec 13 '10 at 14:43
    
Yes, it's his thing. The code in general is not very idiomatic Lua. In particular, his method of creating classes is very unusual: creating a new closure for every instance method, storing state in upvalues, rather than one set of shared methods for the class with state stored in tables. This is pretty wasteful, but it's also a way to create truly private state. That could be what he's doing, but then there's other areas of the code where he uses tables for state (sometimes with the same class storing part of it's state in upvalues, and part in a table). – Mud Dec 14 '10 at 3:50
    
Mud, thanks for the discussion. Again, since I'm new to Lua, would you mind explaining what you mean by upvalues? Thanks! – Jeffrey D. Hoffman Dec 15 '10 at 14:57
    
Yes, I'll explain what I mean, but these comments are very limited so I'll edit the answer above. – Mud Dec 15 '10 at 22:36
    
The last piece of code does not looks right to me. Writing print(p1:getX()) after p1 = Point(10,20) prints a nil and not 10. – KRao May 11 '11 at 11:58

I frequently write my own Lua scripts this way because it improves readability in this case:

function main()
    helper1( helper2( arg[1] ) )
    helper3()
end

function helper1( foo )
    print( foo )
end

function helper2( bar )
    return bar*bar
end

function helper3()
    print( 'hello world!' )
end

main()

This way the "main" code is at the top, but I can still define the necessary global functions before it executes.

A simple trick, really. I can't think of any reason to do this besides readability.

share|improve this answer

The first style could be used too improove readability, but I would rather give the function some meaningful name instead of main or just go without the function.

By the way, I think it's always a good practice to name blocks of code, i.e. put them into functions or methods. It helps explain your intend with that piece of code, and encourages reuse.

share|improve this answer

I don't see much point to the first style as you've shown it. But if it said something like if arg then main() end at the bottom, the script might (just might) be useful as a loadable "library" in addition to being a standalone script. That said, having a main() like that smacks of C, not Lua; I think you're right to question it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.