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I keep getting puzzled, can't find a contextmenu that will work for me. Maybe someone can help?

Here's to what I need contextMenu to be added to:

<ul id="list_{id}" class="list">
   <li id="Item_{id}"><a ondblclick=""><span>{title}</span></a></li>
</ul>

This is dynamic list, so it will add many more of them on the page and differ them by giving different ID's. So I need a contextMenu which will be added to every list but for each list an unique contextMenu. Basically different instances of contextMenu in every list, by adding dynamic {id} tag to the ID of contextMenu or something like that.

Thanks

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1  
What do you mean by context menu? A context menu that appears when you right click on a page is provided the browser and cannot be modified. You can however prevent the browser from showing this and instead draw a "fake" context menu. In this case you wouldn't create multiple context menus but have a single one that adapts its content depending on which element you clicked. –  Box9 Dec 11 '10 at 23:01
    
I mean a right click menu, each "ul" elements on the page must have it's own context menu. So when I click on the list with the ID of "list_{id}" there comes up a context menu with "{someFunction}". –  Yan Dec 12 '10 at 10:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's kind of hard to tell what you're asking, but if you want to hook into the "context menu" event of a browser, you hook the contextmenu event and then do whatever you're going to do (which could include creating a div, for instance, with options on it — e.g., your own context menu). You can either do that on the lists themselves, individually, via getElementById as you indicated in your question, or you can do it by hooking the event on some container that holds all of the lists, and then figuring out when the event is triggered which list it was triggered on ("event delegation").

See the end of this answer for the event delegation approach. But assuming you have a way of knowing the actual IDs used and you want to hook each list specifically for some reason:

HTML:

<ul id='list_1'>
  <li>List 1 item 1</li>
  <li>List 1 item 2</li>
</ul>
<ul id='list_2'>
  <li>List 2 item 1</li>
  <li>List 2 item 2</li>
</ul>

JavaScript:

hookEvent(document.getElementById('list_1'), 'contextmenu', function(event) {
  event = event || window.event;
  if (event.preventDefault) {
    event.preventDefault();
  }
  display("List 1 context menu");
  return false;
});
hookEvent(document.getElementById('list_2'), 'contextmenu', function(event) {
  event = event || window.event;
  if (event.preventDefault) {
    event.preventDefault();
  }
  display("List 2 context menu");
  return false;
});

function hookEvent(element, event, handler) {
  if (element.addEventListener) {
    element.addEventListener( event, handler, false);
  }
  else if (element.attachEvent) {
    element.attachEvent('on' + event, handler);
  }
  else {
    element['on' + event] = handler;
  }
}

Live example

Note that only some (most) browsers let you cancel the default context menu.


Update: Re your "but what if the ID is bindable?" question below: I'm afraid I don't know what you mean by "bindable" — none of the tags on your question indicates a specific templating technology. You haven't even mentioned whether the templating is happening server-side or client-side, which makes it hard to help. But basically, by the time the JavaScript is running, there will be real IDs on real elements in the document. You'll have to know what those IDs are in order to use getElementById.

Server-side templating:

If those IDs are going to be completely dynamic and the template is being handled on the server, you can include a small bit of script that passes those IDs on to JavaScript. For instance, near the top of your document you might have:

<script type='text/javascript'>
var mySpecialListIDs = [];
</script>

...and then update your template to add a small script tag each time it's expanded:

<ul id="list_{id}" class="list">
   <li id="Item_{id}"><a ondblclick=""><span>{title}</span></a></li>
</ul>
<script type='text/javascript'>
mySpecialListIDs.push("{id}");
</script>

Then your client-side code can loop through mySpecialLitIDs and use each ID when hooking up the handler.

Client-side templating:

If the templating is being done client-side, this gets a bit simpler: Just set up your mySpecialListIDs list at some convenient place in your client-side script, and the append to it each time you call the templating engine.


Event Delegation: Whether you're doing server- or client-side templating, if you're going to have dynamic lists like this, sometimes event delegation is the best way to handle it. The contextmenu event (like most, but not all, events) bubbles up the DOM. So if you hook it on an ancestor element (something that contains all of your lists, like the document body itself or some such), you can then see which actual list was clicked by examining the event object. Like this:

HTML:

<div id='list_container'>
  <ul id='list_1'>
    <li>List 1 item 1</li>
    <li>List 1 item 2</li>
  </ul>
  <ul id='list_2'>
    <li>List 2 item 1</li>
    <li>List 2 item 2</li>
  </ul>
</div>

JavaScript (using the hookEvent function from above):

// Hook up the contextmenu event on the container, not
// on each list:
hookEvent(document.getElementById('list_container'),
          'contextmenu',
          handleListContextMenu);

// Our handler function
function handleListContextMenu(event) {
  var target;

  // Handle IE-vs-the-world difference
  event = event || window.event;

  // Find out what the actual target element clicked was
  target = event.target || event.srcElement;

  // See if it or an ancestor of it is one of our lists
  while (target &&
         (target.tagName !== "UL" || !target.id || target.id.substring(0, 5) !== "list_")) {
    target = target.parentNode;
  }

  // Did we find a list?
  if (target) {
    // Yes, handle this.
    if (event.preventDefault) {
      event.preventDefault();
    }
    display("List '" + target.id + "' context menu");
    return false;
  }
}

Live example

share|improve this answer
    
But what If my ID is a bindable ({id}), how would I then find it using getElementById? –  Yan Dec 12 '10 at 10:38
    
@Yan: I'm afraid I don't know what you mean by "bindable" — none of the tags on your question indicates a specific templating technology. You haven't even mentioned whether the templating is happening server-side or client-side, which makes it hard to help. But I've updated the answer to cover some bases and to provide an option (event delegation) I really should have mentioned originally. Good luck with it. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 12 '10 at 11:33
    
It is a server-side templating. By using what you've provided then in the context menu I should write "getElementById('mySpecialListIDs')"? –  Yan Dec 12 '10 at 12:18
    
@Yan: No, that would try to find an element that had the ID "mySpecialListIDs". What you'd do is loop through the array, getting each ID, and calling getElementById on that ID to hook up that list. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 12 '10 at 12:32
    
still don't get how to modify that contextMenu script –  Yan Dec 12 '10 at 13:06

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