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"""Making a better version of my IF(Interactive Fiction) module so you can just create a module that imports it and you can start adding crap Three things- Well four if you count the DEBUG variable- The variables PLAYER_NAME, PLAYER_LOCATION, and PLAYER_INVENTORY. In the base they are "Luke", None, and list The adventure content module uses "from mask_IF import *", changing any of those variables makes it in the current namespace- it doesn't alter the imported ones. And due to *, I can't mask_IF.VARIABLE = value either.

I would like to keep my "from mask_IF import *", but at the same time I have these variables which should be defined with every separate adventure module and are used in the main module. """

==== In the main module:

PLAYER_NAME = "Luke"
...
class ActionHelp(Action):
    def ActionHandle(self, Object1, Object2):
        print "No help for you, " + PLAYER_NAME + "!"

In the adventure module:

from mask_IF import *
Text("Your name is normally " + PLAYER_NAME)
...
PLAYER_NAME = "Adventure_Tester #001"
Text("But today you are " + PLAYER_NAME)

==== Your name is normally Luke But today you are Adventure_Tester #001

help No help for you, Luke! The command is help The Object1 is NOT GIVEN The Object2 is NOT GIVEN

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3 Answers 3

You can't do this, for the reason you have given. It can be simulated by creating an object with the appropriate attributes, but then you may as well not import * to begin with.

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Yeah, you can't do it. the "from mask_IF import *" is creating a new variable named PLAYER_NAME in your current module, which happens to point to the same underlying data to begin with. It is not an alias for the variable in the mask_IF module. When you try to assign something else to PLAYER_NAME, you're telling the local variable to point to something new, which has no effect at all on what the mask_IF variable points to.

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If you were to use an object like StrObj instead of strings, then you would be dealing with a mutable type reference that could have a value updated from anywhere. The only difference in your code would be in setting it with a call to Set() rather than = '...'.

class StrObj(object):
    def __init__(self, value=''):
        self.value = value
    def __add__(self, other):
        return other + self.value
    def Set(self, value):
        self.value = value

Assuming that in mask_IF.py, PLAYER_NAME = StrObj('Some Name')...

from mask_IF import *
Text("Your name is normally " + PLAYER_NAME)
...
PLAYER_NAME.Set("Adventure_Tester #001")
Text("But today you are " + PLAYER_NAME)

All that being said...

I think you would be better off defining a Player object with properties for NAME, etc... and just using that instead. I recommend using import * sparsely.

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