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I'm piecing together an image website. The basic schema's pretty simple MySQL, but I'm having some trouble trying to represent possible admin flags associated with an image ("inappropriate", "copyrighted", etc.). My current notion is as follows:

tblImages (
    imageID INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    ...
);

tblImageFlags (
    imageFlagID INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    imageID INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    flagTypeID INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    resolutionTypeID INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    ...
);

luResolutionTypes (
    resolutionTypeID INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    resolutionType VARCHAR(63) NOT NULL,
    ...
);

(truncated for ease of reading; assorted foreign keys and indexes are in order, I swear)

tblImageFlags.flagTypeID is foreign-keyed on a lookup table of flag types, and as you can imagine tblImageFlags.resolutionTypeID should be foreign-keyed on luResolutionTypes.resolutionTypeID. The issue at hand is that, when a flag is first issued, there is no logical resolution type (I'd declare this a good use of NULL); however, if a value is set, it should be foreign-keyed to the lookup table.

I can't find a MySQL syntax workaround to this situation. Does it exist? The best runners up are:

  • Add an "unmoderated" resolution type
  • Add a NULL entry to luResolutionTypes.resolutionTypeID (would this even work in an AUTO_INCREMENT column?)

Thanks for the insight!

PS Bonus points to whomever tells me whether, in the case of databases, it's "indexes" or "indices".


Follow-up: thanks to Bill Karwin for pointing out what turned out to be a syntax error in the table structure (don't set a column to NOT NULL if you want it to allow NULL!). And once I have enough karma to give you those bonus points, I will :)

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3  
I have over 11k points and I can't award bonus points! :-) You can only give one upvote, plus the "accepted" checkmark. –  Bill Karwin Jan 14 '09 at 21:47
4  
And by the way, there's a different user at StackOverflow named Bill K, so please refer to me as Bill Karwin. :) –  Bill Karwin Jan 14 '09 at 21:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 54 down vote accepted

You can solve this by allowing NULL in the foreign key column tblImageFlags.resolutionTypeID.

The plural of index should be indexes.

According to "Modern American Usage" by Bryan A. Garner:

For ordinary purposes, indexes is the preferable plural, not indices. ... Indices, though less pretentious than fora or dogmata, is pretentious nevertheless. Some writers prefer indices in technical contexts, as in mathematics and the sciences. Though not the best plural for index, indices is permissible in the sense "indicators." ... Avoid the singular indice, a back-formation from the plural indices.

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16  
+1 for English lesson –  Camilo Martin Jan 22 '13 at 13:31
    
What do you do with foreign keys to primary key columns which aren't allowed to be NULL? This is a problem that has plagued my apps over the years and I sometimes end up using 0, or foregoing the foreign key relation, but that is not optimal. –  glyph Feb 13 '13 at 0:18
1  
Well I just did an experiment and my problem was a that my pk fields had a default value. PK field is NULL but default is none, then FK field can be NULL and everything is good. –  glyph Feb 13 '13 at 4:55
8  
Indexes is indeed more common in American English - but less so in British English where indices is used more frequently, especially in technical contexts... grammarist.com/usage/indexes-indices –  Basic Feb 25 '13 at 13:25
5  
Great... now I need to analyze if my DB architectures sound pretencious or not. –  Prusprus Jul 23 at 20:20

In my experience, the only accepted English-language plural of ‘index’ is indices. Use of "indexes" in a public place gets one a short sharp rebuke from one's peers. And I advise you do not refer to anything Americans say as authoritative, they get our language wrong all the time, especially, it would seem, some pretentious guy called "Bryan A. Garner" who seems to claim to know what you should use. He has no more authority on the subject than you or I.

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