Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the difference between the return and exit statement in BASH functions with respect to exit codes?

share|improve this question
15  
Protip: type help <command> in your shell to get info on what a shell builtin will do. In your case help return and help exit –  SiegeX Dec 12 '10 at 1:31
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 47 down vote accepted

return returns a value from a function. exit abandons the current shell.

EDIT:

As per your edit of the question, regarding exit codes, return has nothing to do with exit codes. Exit codes are intended for applications/scripts, not functions. So in this regard, the only keyword that sets the exit code of the script (the one that can be caught by the calling program using the $? shell variable) is exit.

share|improve this answer
    
But exit can also return a value from a function. –  lecodesportif Dec 12 '10 at 1:31
4  
Not exactly. It always return a value from the current shell. It doesn't matter if you are inside a function or not. –  Diego Sevilla Dec 12 '10 at 1:36
2  
Comment on your edit: I may be confusing return values and exit codes, but func(){ return 50; };func;echo $? echoes 50. So the $? shell variable doesn't seem to be limited to exit. –  lecodesportif Dec 12 '10 at 1:53
3  
"$? Expands to the exit status of the most recently executed foreground pipeline." That exit may be from the shell in the form of a call to exit (or hitting the end of the script) or in the form of a call to return within a function. –  SiegeX Dec 12 '10 at 1:58
4  
@lecodesportif: The $? of the current process/script is limited either to exit or to the result of the last command executed by this script. So, if your last script line is the call to that function, and that function returns 50, yes, the $? that you produce to the process that called you is 50. However, that doesn't have to do with the return, because this is restricted to the current script. It happens to be returned only if this function call is the last sentence of the script. exit, however, always finish the script and return that value as $? to the calling process. –  Diego Sevilla Dec 12 '10 at 10:05
add comment

As noted, return will cause the current function to go out of scope where exit will cause the script to end at the point where it is called. Here is a sample program to help explain this:

#!/bin/bash

retfunc()
{
    echo "this is retfunc()"
    return 1
}

exitfunc()
{
    echo "this is exitfunc()"
    exit 1
}

retfunc
echo "We are still here"
exitfunc
echo "We will never see this"

Output

$ ./test.sh
this is retfunc()
We are still here
this is exitfunc()
share|improve this answer
2  
Nice example. You could also show the exit value of 1 in $?. –  Diego Sevilla Dec 12 '10 at 1:42
8  
Note that this function will NOT print "We are still here" if you add "set -e" before the call to "retfunc". –  Michael Apr 30 '12 at 23:12
1  
However, echo fnord | while read x; do exitfunc; done; echo "still here" will print "still here". It seems that only the while sub-shell is exited in this scenario. –  tripleee Dec 11 '13 at 9:30
    
An approximate workaround is done || exit $? but that is ugly and not precisely equivalent. –  tripleee Dec 11 '13 at 9:44
    
@tripleee right, exit will terminate the current shell. In your example the pipe created a subshell of which the while loop will run. To avoid the subshell and get the same functionality you can use process substitution while read x; do exitfunc; done < <(echo fnord); echo "still here" –  SiegeX Dec 13 '13 at 6:32
add comment

I don't think anyone has really fully answered the question because they don't describe how the two are used. OK I think we know that exit kills the script, where ever it is called and you can assign a status to it as well such as exit or exit 0 or exit 7 and so forth. This can be used to determine how the script was forced to stop if called by another script etc. Enough on exit.

return when called will return the value specified to indicate the function's behavior, usually a 1 or a 0. For example:

    #!/bin/bash
    isdirectory() {
      if [ -d "$1" ]
      then
        return 0
      else
        return 1
      fi
    echo "you will not see anything after the return like this text"
    }

check like this:

    if isdirectory $1; then echo "is directory"; else echo "not a directory"; fi

or like this:

    isdirectory || echo "not a directory"

In this example, the test can be used to indicate if the directory was found. notice that anything after the return will not be executed in the function. 0 is true but false is 1 in the shell, different from other prog langs.

For more info on functions: http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/return-values-bash-functions

share|improve this answer
add comment

Remember, functions are internal to a script and normally return from whence they were called by using the return statement. Calling an external script is another matter entirely, and scripts usually terminate with an exit statement.

The difference "between the return and exit statement in BASH functions with respect to exit codes" is very little. Both return a status, not values per se. A status of zero indicates success, while any other status (1 to 255) indicates a failure. The return statement will return to the script from where it was called, while the exit statement will end the entire script from whereever it is encountered.

return 0 # returns to where the function was called. $? contains 0 (success).

return 1 # returns to where the function was called. $? contains 1 (failure).

exit 0 # exits the script completely. $? contains 0 (success).

exit 1 # exits the script completely. $? contains 1 (failure).

If your function simply ends with no return statement, the status of the last command exectued is returned as the status code (and will be placed in $?).

Remember, return and exit give back a status code from 0 to 255, available in $?. You cannot stuff anything else into a status code (e.g. return "cat"); it will not work. But, a script can pass back 255 diferent reasons for failure by using status codes.

You can set variables contained in the calling script, or echo results in the function and use comamnd substitution in the calling script; but the purpose of return and exit are to pass status codes, not values or computatoin results as one might expect in a programming language like C.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.