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I'm getting ready to start developing web content (simple web pages, heavy duty web services) in Django. What are my options for IDEs? What are the good points and bad points? Is Aptana in Eclipse good for this. I would like to be able to easily push my updates to the remote server.

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migrated from serverfault.com Dec 12 '10 at 6:30

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No, you're not. Someone will be along shortly to move it. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 12 '10 at 3:44
    
Oh oops. Can you refer me to a better site? –  JnBrymn Dec 12 '10 at 3:46
    
Try StackOverflow. –  Matthew Schinckel Dec 12 '10 at 4:34

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Django Pydev - Eclipse plugin for developing Django/Python Apps. It's free.

Pycharm - Python and Django IDE from JetBrains(people who brought us IntelliJ IDE). Not free.

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Since I really like the possibility of using Eclipse, the first option sounds interesting. How does it deal with remote SVN repositories? –  JnBrymn Dec 12 '10 at 20:39
    
Eclipse does have plugins for SVN support. Being a Git user in the command line, I don't really know how good it is. But accessing remote repos seems to be a trivial feature that should be supported in the plugin. –  rubayeet Dec 13 '10 at 5:50

I highly recommend wing ide. I will not do python commercially without it.

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Check out their django debugging support wingware.com/doc/howtos/django –  basarat Dec 12 '10 at 6:40

I have tried all IDEs. I have Been using Eclipse+PyDev for the past few months. I recently switched to PyCharm. I think it's got the whole package. Not free, though. However I think its price is right. Although I can get it for free through the university which I study as a PhD student, I seriously consider paying for it.

Yes, PyCharm is free for opensource projects and educational purposes.

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I recommend PyCharm and PhpStorm as PHP IDE

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Eclipse+PyDev, NetBeans, Eric in the past. Pycharm is a best choice ever, especially for web development with Django.

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Komodo Edit..

Doesn't cost anything but has all the stuff you need, including a proper and out-of-the box Django support.

That means not only the usual python autocompletion but also django-specific functions, and a django-specific syntax highlightning for example for the template files.

I use it every day. If you need more functionality you could buy the Komodo IDE, but for me the amount of features of Komodo Edit is absolutely enough, because I can extend them with plugins from their repository or make own macros, etc.

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I found an excellent discussion about this topics here

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Note that link-only answers are discouraged, SO answers should be the end-point of a search for a solution (vs. yet another stopover of references, which tend to get stale over time). Please consider adding a stand-alone synopsis here, keeping the link as a reference. –  kleopatra Sep 26 '13 at 9:30

Koding works well for Django & Python2/3 (and any language, really). It comes with all of the basics installed, and for things that aren't installed it gives you a normal Ubuntu VM, which you have full root access to. So you aren't limited to what is already on Koding :)

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