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Can I display the result of a loop in the console window in a VCL application for debugging purposes?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

In Windows, the simplest way to output debug information is to use OutputDebugString() and then use an application able to receive that output. The event viewer in the Delphi IDE itself is able to receive that input, or you can use the DebugView application from SysInternals to get output on a system that hasn't the IDE installed. AFAIK, GExperts has a similar tool too. That's because a GUI application has not by default a console where to write output, otherwise you have to create one (see Gerry's answer).

One of OutputDebugString()'s advantages is that the application will work without problems even if a call slips into a release build (or is if left there intentionally), but be careful then to not output sensitive information, because they can be read using one of the tools above.

You could also create an ad-hoc form (that is, with a memo control) and route output there.

There are also advanced logging facilities like SmartInspect, CodeSite and others.

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5  
FWIW, I want to mention that this does not answer the question, which is "How can I write to console window for debugging?" –  Sertac Akyuz Dec 13 '10 at 10:43
1  
Maybe because in Windows writing to a console is not the best way to debug? Windows is not Linux or Java. –  user160694 Dec 13 '10 at 15:44
    
OutputDebugString() is definitely the "simplest". When you need "robust", though, it's better to DIY with a console window. Do a Google search for "We have seen problems for years with OutputDebugString() being unreliable at times" for why "simplest" and "robust" are not the same. If it doesn't absolutely have to work every single time, OutputDebugString() is fine. –  Ron Burk Oct 2 '13 at 6:46

The simplest way is to compile as a console application, but put the normal application framework code back in the dpr.

program Project2;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  Forms,
  SysUtils,
  Unit1 in 'Unit1.pas' {Form1};

begin
  Application.Initialize;
  Application.CreateForm(TForm1, Form1);
  writeln('Hello, World!');
  Application.Run;
end.

A slightly more complex way is to use the Windows API AllocConsole call:

program Project2;

uses
  Forms,
  SysUtils,
  Windows,
  Unit1 in 'Unit1.pas' {Form1};

begin
  Application.Initialize;
  Application.CreateForm(TForm1, Form1);
  AllocConsole;
  writeln('Hello, World!');
  Application.Run;
end.

This method has the (usually) disadvantage of creating a new console if you are calling from the command line. From memory getting redirection to work requires some more code as well. The advantage is that you can decide to allocate the console at run-time, rather than compile time.

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I think these behave differently if you call the program from the console. The first attaches to the existing console window, the second creates a new one. –  CodesInChaos Dec 12 '10 at 10:34
5  
+1. I like the second approach. –  Andreas Rejbrand Dec 12 '10 at 13:45
    
Attaching to the first console is usually more desirable –  David Heffernan Dec 12 '10 at 14:22
    
@CodeInChaos, @David - yeah, I forgot to mention that. It is also a pain if you want to redirect input or output. Its big advantage is that it can be done optionally in a project, which can be useful for debugging. –  Gerry Coll Dec 12 '10 at 23:56
    
+1 The {$APPTYPE CONSOLE} directive works even in Delphi 5. –  01es Jul 25 '13 at 12:08

If you wrote the console application, you can try OutputDebugString function in the console application (I didn't try).

Or you can capture the output of the console application like in Capture the output from a DOS (command/console) Window .

Also, you can check Console Application Runner Classes. I use these classes. I think they are great.

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Delphi has got an option for this, check "Generate console application" in the linker options for the project. Standard I/O will be directed to a console window which will accompany your GUI application. Then you can use Writeln etc. as you normally would.

Read Output (or Input) from the docs:

Delphi programs have a standard output file if they are linked as console applications.

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+1. I think this is the solution. –  Andreas Rejbrand Dec 12 '10 at 13:44
4  
I wish the down-vote would come with an explanation. –  Sertac Akyuz Dec 12 '10 at 14:36
    
Is it just me, or has there been an unusual amount of unexplained down-voting here at SO lately? –  Andreas Rejbrand Dec 12 '10 at 14:55
    
@Andreas - Well, I guess when there's nothing to explain there won't be an explanation. I suggest to honest down-voters to read this meta question. Most voted answers there will shed some light on what could be viewed as a best down-voting policy as perceived by the majority of the community. –  Sertac Akyuz Dec 12 '10 at 15:05
2  
I just hate stupid down-voting... –  François Dec 12 '10 at 19:38

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