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I came to AS3 from JS world, and I should confess that anonymous functions are my weakness. I tend to use them everywhere. Now, coming to AS3 I've heard and read in lots of places, that AS and Flash are enormously bad at handling garbage collection, that one should empty, dispose and remove all event handlers and objects manually to avoid weird and unexplainable memory leaks and crashes. Not sure what part of this is true, but I would like to follow best practices right from the beginning.

So my question would be - how bad is idea of using anonymous functions as event handlers? Consider for example a code like this:

addEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, function() : void {
    controls.elapsed = stream.time;
});

contorls.elapsed is the setter, which apart from setting current play time for video player, updates the whole UI, and stream is NetStream object, which streams the actual video.

There are lot's of other places where anonymous function may make code cleaner and more intuitive. Check the following code for simple fade-in effect for the control bar:

public function showControls() : void
    {
        var self:Controls = this;

        if (!visible) {
            visible = true;
            fadeTimer = new Timer(30, 10);
            fadeTimer.addEventListener(TimerEvent.TIMER, function() : void {
                self.alpha += 0.1;
            });
            fadeTimer.addEventListener(TimerEvent.TIMER_COMPLETE, function() : void {
                self.alpha = 1;
            });
            fadeTimer.start();
        }
    }

I totally like how it looks and fits into the code, but I'm concerned about leaks. While Event.ENTER_FRAME handler probably would never become harmful in this form, what about timer listeners. Should I remove those listeners manually, or they will be removed automatically, as soon as I set fadeTimer = null ? Is it possible to remove listeners with anonymous functions properly at all?

share|improve this question
1  
I am not a fan of anonymous functions. For one, they are ugly, you also cannot reuse the function elsewhere (possibly leading to duplicate code), and last, they create an activation object that has some performance and memory impacts. onflex.org/ACDS/AS3TuningInsideAVM2JIT.pdf – Allan Dec 12 '10 at 23:15
3  
Is there anything in AS that doesn't cause some performance and memory impacts? :) Well, in my understanding anonymous functions are only useful, when one doesn't need to reuse those functions, doesn't want to clutter class definition and wants to keep the whole logic in one place. This is how and when I tend to use them. Thanks for the link, I will check it. – jayarjo Dec 15 '10 at 10:23
2  
Hmm... "some performance and memory impact" that actually turned out to be a quote. Now what kind of a statement is it? What does it mean "some"? If this is read by it's meaning, then "some" sounds like negligible value. Or no? How very vague. – jayarjo Dec 15 '10 at 10:36
1  
It seems that 'activation object' is not specific to AS, but is a part of ECMA standard. And gets created for anonymous functions in JS as well. But that doesn't keep everybody on the web from using it, right? Or maybe AS implementation of the feature is buggy and sluggy? – jayarjo Dec 15 '10 at 10:41
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's nothing wrong with using function methods where it works. As far as memory leaks go, you need to track the object to the stage to see if it can be removed.

Adding an ENTER_FRAME event handler to the control ensures that the control has a reference to the anonymous function. As the code is part of the control (or so it appears), this is fine as the anonymous function will be removed when the control is.

Adding an event handler to the timer ensures that the timer has a reference to the anonymous function. If the timer is running, it will keep the anonymous function reference alive and, by association, the enture control. Once the timer has stopped, however, both it and the function should be collected.

If all else fails, use the profiler and see! ;)

share|improve this answer
    
By "should be collected" you mean automatically? or I will have to interfere with a manual dispose() function? :) – jayarjo Dec 12 '10 at 11:12
    
I mean the garbage collection should remove it automatically when it performs a sweep. – Richard Szalay Dec 12 '10 at 18:00
1  
The code above, the fadetimer will never be garbage collected. It either needs explicit removeEventListener, or setting your addEventListener to useWeakReferences = false. (i.e. addEventListener(type, callback, false[usecapture], 0[priority], true[useweakref]); Removing the control from the stage will NOT remove the event handler. – ansiart Feb 24 '11 at 21:11
    
@ansiart - I won't remove the event handler, but it will make the object that holds a reference to it eligible for garbage collection (assuming it's not rooted elsewhere). – Richard Szalay Nov 14 '13 at 10:50

Just noticed this post -- there are a couple things that might be of use to you. One is arguments.callee (which is a reference to the current function you're in). This is useful for removing references in anonymous functions. Also, it could be noted that you could use weak references in your addEventListener code -- however, this won't work for variables that are anonymous, as they'd get GC'd pretty much immediately. For simplicity sake I rewrote your code like this: (should work -- haven't tested)

private function showControls() : void {

    if (visible) {
        return;
    }

    var self:DisplayObject = this;

    var fadeTimer= new Timer(30,10);
    var handler = function(e:Event) {

        switch (e.type) {

            // timer complete
            case TimerEvent.TIMER_COMPLETE:

                // remove references to this anonymous function -- for garbage collection
                fadeTimer.removeEventListener(TimerEvent.TIMER_COMPLETE, arguments.callee);
                fadeTimer.removeEventListener(TimerEvent.TIMER, arguments.callee);

                // break out
                return self.alpha = 1;

            // timer
            case TimerEvent.TIMER:
                return self.alpha += 0.1;

        }
    }

    fadeTimer.addEventListener(TimerEvent.TIMER, handler);
    fadeTimer.addEventListener(TimerEvent.TIMER_COMPLETE, handler);
    fadeTimer.start();

}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that's completely great! Thanks, amazing how I never thought about using callee in such a way... But if it works it should have been a very popular practice I think, right? Does it really do a job, have you tested? Is there any hidden caveat? – jayarjo Feb 25 '11 at 6:41
1  
hidden caveat is that it's not recommended. I did a test a couple days ago and it worked fine -- though I still don't see it as the "great" option. I think the class members are the best way to go. You should look up the traits object -- it's basically a hidden internal object that allows flash to do fast lookup of members. I generally like to lump a bunch of handlers together with the switch event to make event handling a bit easier. This sort of code is just asking for a utility class to be made. – ansiart Mar 2 '11 at 20:43

I would do it something like this. And, be sure to use dispose() when you want to make sure to clear the timer if interrupting.

private function showControls() : void
{
    if(_isVisible)
        return;

    // start you control here
    _fadeTimer = new Timer(30, 10);
    _fadeTimer.removeEventListener(TimerEvent.TIMER, updateFade);
    _fadeTimer.removeEventListener(TimerEvent.TIMER_COMPLETE, updateFadeComplete);
    _fadeTimer.start();
}

private function updateFade(event : TimerEvent) : void
{
    // update fade here
}

private function updateFadeComplete(event : TimerEvent) : void
{
    dispose();
}


private function dispose() : void
{
    if(_fadeTimer)
    {
        _fadeTimer.stop();
        _fadeTimer.removeEventListener(TimerEvent.TIMER, updateFade);
        _fadeTimer.removeEventListener(TimerEvent.TIMER_COMPLETE, updateFadeComplete);
        _fadeTimer = null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
By the way, why these underscores everywhere? They kinda add to the clumsiness of the code, no? – jayarjo Dec 12 '10 at 10:07
2  
Sorry. Because they are private class members. – Mattias Dec 12 '10 at 10:12
3  
@jayarjo - The underscores a are a common, but not required, convention for naming a private field/variable – Richard Szalay Dec 14 '10 at 8:52
    
Generally underscored property names should be used where there's an accompanying accessor. If a property is not going to have an accessor, I just write the property name without an underscore. – davestewart Oct 6 '14 at 11:26

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