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I have the following utility routine which determine whether a type derives from a specific type:

private static bool DerivesFrom(Type rType, Type rDerivedType)
{
    while ((rType != null) && ((rType != rDerivedType)))
        rType = rType.BaseType;
    return (rType == rDerivedType);
}

(actually I don't know whether there is a more convenient way to test the derivation...)

The problem is I want to determine whether a type derives from a generic type, but without specify the generic arguments.

For example I can write:

DerivesFrom(typeof(ClassA), typeof(MyGenericClass<ClassB>))

but what I need is the following

DerivesFrom(typeof(ClassA), typeof(MyGenericClass))

How can I achieve it?


Based on the example of Darin Miritrov, this is a sample application:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    public class MyGenericClass<T> { }
    public class ClassB {}
    public class ClassA : MyGenericClass<ClassB> { }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            bool result = DerivesFrom(typeof(ClassA), typeof(MyGenericClass<>));
            Console.WriteLine(result); // prints **false**
        }

        private static bool DerivesFrom(Type rType, Type rDerivedType)
        {
            return rType.IsSubclassOf(rDerivedType);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You could leave the generic parameter open:

DerivesFrom(typeof(ClassA), typeof(MyGenericClass<>));

should work. Example:

public class ClassA { }
public class MyGenericClass<T>: ClassA { }

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var result = DerivesFrom(typeof(MyGenericClass<>), typeof(ClassA));
        Console.WriteLine(result); // prints True
    }

    private static bool DerivesFrom(Type rType, Type rDerivedType)
    {
        return rType.IsSubclassOf(rDerivedType);
    }
}

Also notice the usage of IsSubClassOf method which should simplify your DerivesFrom method and kind of defeat its purpose. There's also the IsAssignableFrom method you may take a look at.

share|improve this answer
    
@Luca, have you looked at the sample I provided? What's wrong with it? You have a base class and a derived generic class exactly as you described in your question. Using an open generic type works at least in this example. If it doesn't work for you, you will need to provide a complete example with your class hierarchy so that we can see what's wrong with it. –  Darin Dimitrov Dec 12 '10 at 10:17
    
Yes, infact I reviewed my comments: The example is working. I need to going deeper on my application. –  Luca Dec 12 '10 at 10:20
    
Found why my application is not working. See the example: ClassA derives from generic type, not viceversa. –  Luca Dec 12 '10 at 10:24

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