Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Rails 3, passing a :confirm parameter to link_to will populate the data-confirm attribute of the link. This will induce a JS alert() when the link is clicked.

I am using the rails jQuery UJS adapter (https://github.com/rails/jquery-ujs). The relevant code from rails.js is:

$('body').delegate('a[data-confirm], button[data-confirm], input[data-confirm]', 'click.rails', function () {
    var el = $(this);
    if (el.triggerAndReturn('confirm')) {
        if (!confirm(el.attr('data-confirm'))) {
            return false;
        }
    }
});

and

triggerAndReturn: function (name, data) {
        var event = new $.Event(name);
        this.trigger(event, data);

        return event.result !== false;
    }

I would like to know how this could be modified to instead yield a jQuery dialog (e.g. the jQuery UI Dialog) allowing the user to confirm or cancel.

My knowledge of JavaScript isn't sufficient to achieve this elegantly. My current approach would be to simply rewrite the $('body').delegate() function to instead instantiate a lightbox. However I imagine that there is a more effective approach than this.

share|improve this question
    
The whole point of :confirm is to ask the user a question with a yes/no answer. AFAIK, lightbox does not have a yes/no response option. How about using a jQuery dialog instead? –  Jacob Dec 12 '10 at 11:41
    
You're right. A dialog would be more appropriate, such as jqueryui.com/demos/dialog/#modal-confirmation. I will edit the question. –  Sai Perchard Dec 12 '10 at 13:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I just added an external API to the Rails jquery-ujs for exactly this kind of customization. You can now make rails.js use a custom confirm dialog by plugging into (and re-writing 1 line of) the $.rails.allowAction function.

See my article, Rails jQuery UJS: Now Interactive, for a full explanation with examples.

EDIT: As of this commit, I moved the confirm dialog function to the $.rails object, so that it can be modified or swapped out even more easily now. E.g.

$.rails.confirm = function(message) { return myConfirmDialog(message); };
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I was looking for, thank you. Thank you to everybody else who provided an answer - however I wasn't particularly satisfied with any approach that involved modifying rails.js. Redefining jquery-ujs functions via $.rails is definitely the way to go. –  Sai Perchard Apr 27 '11 at 9:01
1  
FYI, I just moved the confirm dialog function directly to the $.rails object, so that it's now even easier to use your own confirm dialog function. See updated answer. –  jangosteve May 8 '11 at 17:24
    
How exactly do you return the JQuery UI modal dialog answer? I am unable to get this working. –  huug Jun 1 '11 at 15:04
    
I'm not sure I can provide a good answer. The main problem is that, for a confirm dialog to work properly, it must be model (i.e. synchronously blocking), and provide a true/false answer. jQuery UI's "modal dialog" does neither. Because of this, it cannot just be dropped in like other js confirm replacements. –  jangosteve Jun 4 '11 at 7:31
1  
Heres a nice how too, rors.org/demos/custom-confirm-in-rails –  Dave Robertson Mar 6 '13 at 1:28

As others have mentioned, you cannot use a jQuery dialog box, as $.rails.confirm needs to block until it returns the users answer.

However, you can overwrite $.rails.allowAction in your application.js file like this:

$.rails.allowAction = function(element) {
        var message = element.data('confirm'),
        answer = false, callback;
        if (!message) { return true; }

        if ($.rails.fire(element, 'confirm')) {
                myCustomConfirmBox(message, function() {
                        callback = $.rails.fire(element,
                                'confirm:complete', [answer]);
                        if(callback) {
                                var oldAllowAction = $.rails.allowAction;
                                $.rails.allowAction = function() { return true; };
                                element.trigger('click');
                                $.rails.allowAction = oldAllowAction;
                        }
                });
        }
        return false;
}

function myCustomConfirmBox(message, callback) {
        // implement your own confirm box here
        // call callback() if the user says yes
}

It works by returning false immediately, thus effectively canceling the click event. However, your custom function can then call the callback to actually follow the link/submit the form.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked the best for me. Thanks for the help, Marc. –  knowncitizen Aug 9 '11 at 3:04
    
Thanks for the help Marc. I've tried implementing your suggestion and it's gotten me farther than any other advice so far, however, I'm still not there yet. This is the code I have in my application.js. I'm still unsure about how the answer gets transferred back to the callback. Also, I don't understand the setting and unsetting of $.rails.allowAction in if(callback). I would be very grateful if you could explain. EDIT: I couldn't fit the code here but please contact me if you have time. Thanks much. –  lightyrs Aug 27 '11 at 16:29
    
For what it's worth, I've made a fork of jquery-ujs which re-implements $.rails.confirm using asynchronous callbacks. It seems to work for several people, but it relies on some undocumented apis in jQuery, so I wouldn't want to pull it into core unless we had a lot of people actively using it for a while, just to be sure there aren't any weird side effects. github.com/JangoSteve/jquery-ujs/tree/async-confirm –  jangosteve Mar 7 '13 at 2:31

This is how I got it to work. Please suggest any corrections / improvements

#

in rails.js

#
// Added new variable
var deleteConfirmed = false;

// Changed function to use jquery dialog instead of confirm   
$('body').delegate('a[data-confirm], button[data-confirm], input[data-confirm]', 'click.rails', function () {
        var el = $(this);
        /*
        if (el.triggerAndReturn('confirm')) {

            if (!confirm(el.attr('data-confirm'))) {
                return false;
            }

        }
        */

        if (el.triggerAndReturn('confirm')) {    

            if(deleteConfirmed) {
                deleteConfirmed = false;
                return true;
            }

            $( "#dialog-confirm" ).dialog("option", "buttons",
                    {
                        "Delete": function() {
                            $( this ).dialog( "close" );
                            deleteConfirmed = true;
                            el.trigger('click');   
                            return true;
                        },
                        Cancel: function() {
                            $( this ).dialog( "close" );
                            return false;
                        }
                    }
            );

            $( "#dialog-confirm" ).dialog("open");

            return false;

        }


    });
#

in application.js

#
//Ensure confirm Dialog is pre-created
jQuery(function () {


    $( "#dialog-confirm" ).dialog({
        autoOpen: false,
        resizable: false,
        height:140,
        modal: true     
    });

});
#

in layout.html Alt you can place this div anywhere in your generated html

#
        <div id='dialog-confirm' title='Confirm Delete'> 
          <p> 
            <span class='ui-icon-alert' style='float:left; margin:0 7px 20px 0;'> 
              This item will be permanently deleted. Are you sure?
            </span> 
          </p> 
        </div> 
share|improve this answer

I don't understand why you need to use the jQuery dialog when the JavaScript confirm() function will still work just fine. I would do something like this:

$('a[data-confirm]').click(funciton() {
  confirm($(this).data("confirm"));
});

If you want to use a dialog instead, it's a little different. You can one-off each dialog you want, or you can probably take a uniform approach application wide so that your rails.js or your application.js can handle any dialog instance. For example, you'd need something like this on your page:

<a class="dialogLauncher">The link that creates your dialog</a>
<div class="dialog" title="My confirmation title" style="display:none">
  <p>My confirmation message</p>
</div>

Then, in your js:

$('.dialogLauncher').click(function() {
  var dialog = $(this).next('.dialog');
  dialog.dialog();
})

If you want to customize your dialog a little more, check out this example.

Edit

Now that I think of it, this would be a good opportunity for a custom form builder. You could override one of your Rails link tags to output html similar to what's listed above whenever a certain attribute is present, i.e. :dialog => true. Surely that would be the Railsy way to do it. You could add other options into your tag as well, like the dialog title, etc.

Edit

Better yet, instead of :dialog => true, use :confirm => "my confirm message" just as you would normally, but in your override of link_to, you will use the :confirm option to create the dialog html that jQuery needs, delete that option, and then call super.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't need to use a jQuery UI dialog - confirm() function will work fine, you are correct. The purpose is purely aesthetic. –  Sai Perchard Dec 14 '10 at 13:13
    
@Sai Perchard: in that case, I've updated my answer –  Samo Dec 14 '10 at 15:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.