Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a preprocessor and postprocessor for Fortran input and output using FORMAT-like statements (there are reasons not to use a FORTRAN library). I want to treat the new line ("/") character correctly. I don't have a Fortran compiler immediately to hand. Is there a simple algorithm for working out how many newlines are written or consumed (This post just gives reading examples)

[Please assume a FORTRAN77-like mentality in the FORTRAN code and correct any FORTRAN syntax on my part]

UPDATE: no comments yet so I am reduced to finding a compiler and running it myself. I'll post the answers if I'm not beaten to it. No-one commented I had the format syntax wrong. I've changed it but there may still be errors

Assume datafile 1

a
b
c
d

etc...

(a) does the READ command always consume a newline? does

READ(1, '(A)') A
READ(1, '(A)') B

give A='a' and B='b'

(b) what does

READ(1,'(A,/)') A
READ(1,'(A)') B

give for B? (I would assume 'c')

(c) what does

READ(1, '(/)')
READ(1, '(A)') A

give for A (is it 'b' or 'c')

(d) what does

READ(1,'(A,/,A)') A, B
READ(1,'(A)') C

give for A and B and C(can I assume 'a' and 'b' and 'c')

(e) what does

READ(1,'(A,/,/,A)') A, B
READ(1,'(A)') C

give for A and B and C(can I assume 'a' and 'c' and 'd')?

Are there any cases in which the '/' is redundant?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To be precise the slash edit descriptor, represented by the character /, is actually the end of record specifier. I'm now going to quote from the draft Fortran 2008 standard, I don't think the programming language's behaviour has changed in this respect since FORTRAN77, but I'm not certain. I'm quoting from the standard because (a) if you are writing a pre- and post-processor I guess you will want it to adhere to the standard rather than to some ambiguous explanation of it which is all I could provide, and (b) there are so many variations in Fortran I/O statements that I am really familiar with only a few of them (and this isn't one of them).

10.8.2 Slash editing

1 The slash edit descriptor indicates the end of data transfer to or from the current record.

2 On input from a file connected for sequential or stream access, the remaining portion of the current record is skipped and the file is positioned at the beginning of the next record. This record becomes the current record. On output to a file connected for sequential or stream access, a new empty record is created following the current record; this new record then becomes the last and current record of the file and the file is positioned at the beginning of this new record.

3 For a file connected for direct access, the record number is increased by one and the file is positioned at the beginning of the record that has that record number, if there is such a record, and this record becomes the current record.

(NOTE 10.25 A record that contains no characters may be written on output. If the file is an internal file or a file connected for direct access, the record is filled with blank characters. An entire record may be skipped on input.)

4 The repeat specification is optional in the slash edit descriptor. If it is not specified, the default value is one.

So, the slash can be used to read to the end of a partially-read record and to skip a record entirely (mutatis mutandis for writing).

If I compile your program (Intel Fortran 11.1 on Mac OS X) I get the following output:

a                                                                               
b                                                                               
====== example b
a                                                                               
c                                                                               
====== example c
c                                                                               
====== example d
a                                                                               
b                                                                               
c                                                                               
====== example e
a                                                                               
c                                                                               
d                                                                               
====== example f
a                                                                               
b                                                                               

which suggests that, based on my interpretation of the standard, gfortran exhibits non-standard behaviour. However, I suspect that if you are more specific in your I/O operations, you might perhaps want to specify record lengths in your READ and WRITEs, you may be able to achieve what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much for replying! Why are there THREE 'a's concatenated? BTW the problem is I am having to guess the FORMAT used.I'm actually parsing using Java but I wanted to make sure that the slash was dealt with as well as possible. –  peter.murray.rust Dec 12 '10 at 13:35
    
Ah, sorry about the confusing output, I'd used an input file which wasn't identical to your won. I've corrected that now. –  High Performance Mark Dec 12 '10 at 14:49
add comment

As there have been no comments so far, I'm adding my own answer. (If anyone adds light to this I'll give them votes).

Program:

program TEST

  character (len=80) :: a,b,c

  write(6,'(a)') '====== example a'
  open(1,file='test1.dat',form='formatted',status='old',action='read')

READ(1, '(A)') a
READ(1, '(A)') b
  write(6,'(a)') a
  write(6,'(a)') b

close(1)

  write(6,'(a)') '====== example b'
  open(1,file='test1.dat',form='formatted',status='old',action='read')

READ(1, '(A,/)') a
READ(1, '(A)') b
  write(6,'(a)') a
  write(6,'(a)') b

close(1)

  write(6,'(a)') '====== example c'
  open(1,file='test1.dat',form='formatted',status='old',action='read')

READ(1, '(/)')
READ(1, '(A)') A
  write(6,'(a)') a

close(1)

  write(6,'(a)') '====== example d'
  open(1,file='test1.dat',form='formatted',status='old',action='read')

READ(1, '(A,/,A)') a,b
READ(1, '(A)') c
  write(6,'(a)') a
  write(6,'(a)') b
  write(6,'(a)') c

close(1)

  write(6,'(a)') '====== example e'
  open(1,file='test1.dat',form='formatted',status='old',action='read')

READ(1,'(A,/,/,A)') a, b
READ(1,'(A)') c
  write(6,'(a)') a
  write(6,'(a)') b
  write(6,'(a)') c

close(1)

  write(6,'(a)') '====== example f'
  open(1,file='test1.dat',form='formatted',status='old',action='read')

READ(1, '(A1)') a
READ(1, '(A1)') b
  write(6,'(a)') a
  write(6,'(a)') b

close(1)
end  

compiled under gfortran gives:

gfortran -O2 -c test.f90
gfortran -o test.x *.o

C:\test>test.x
====== example a
a

b

====== example b
a

c

====== example c
c

====== example d
a

b

c

====== example e
a

c

d

====== example f
 a

 b

QUESTION: why are there additional new lines between all the outputs? Is there a newline in the strings that have been read in?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Those new lines are really 79 printed spaces. Use the LEN_TRIM() function to your write statements like this: write(6,'(a)') a(1:LEN_TRIM(a)) or change the length of your character field to (1)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.