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I've this code

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int x = 20;
    int y = 35;
    x = y++ + x++;
    y = ++y + ++x;
    Console.WriteLine(x);
    Console.WriteLine(y);
    Console.ReadLine();
}

I expected the output to be x = 57 and y = 94. However, when executed it gave me 56 and 93. For some reason the post increment operator is not getting executed in line 3.

Is this because we are assigning the result of expressing in line 3 to x itself? Are there any other scenarios where the post increment operator would not result as expected.

Thanks.

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3  
Just a hint: scenarios like this are much easier figured out if you put each test case in a separate function. Verifying what happens in the second assignment is unnecessarily difficult due to the first assignment. –  Adrian Grigore Dec 12 '10 at 11:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted
int x = 20;
int y = 35;
// x = y++ + x++; this is equivalent of
tmp = 35 + 20; y++; x++; x = tmp;
// so here we have x = 55; y = 36
// y = ++y + ++x;
y ++; // 37
x ++; // 56;
y = x + y;
// so here we have y = 93, x = 56;
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Thank you - It clears my doubt. –  stackoverflow Dec 12 '10 at 11:11

The rules in C# are extremely straightforward. They are:

  • subexpressions of an expression are evaluated LEFT TO RIGHT, period, end of story.
  • the side effect of an increment operator happens when the operator is evaluated.

So in your case, this breaks down like this; I'll pretend that we're doing this in C instead of C# so that where the addresses and dereferences are is more clear.

x = y++ + x++; 

Evaluate the address of x and store that.

t1 = &x;

Evaluate the address of y.

t2 = &y;

Evaluate the value stored in the address just computed. That's 35.

t3 = *t2; // 35

The value just computed is the value of the expression; it is the value before the increment.

Add one to that value.

t4 = t3 + 1; // 36

Store 36 in the address. y is now 36.

*t2 = t4; // y = 36

Now do the same for x++:

t5 = &x;
t6 = *t5;     // 20
t7 = t6 + 1;  // 21
*t5 = t7;     // x = 21

OK, now we have to do the addition:

t8 = t3 + t6; // 35 + 20 = 55

and assign that to the address computed at first:

*t1 = t8;  // x = 55;

At the end of this statement x has had three values. 20, 21 and 55. y has had two values, 35 and 36. x is now 55 and y is now 36.

y = ++y + ++x; 

Now we do the same thing again, except this time we use the values after the increments. Follow along:

t1 = &y;
t2 = &y;
t3 = *t2; // 36
t4 = t3 + 1; // 37
*t2 = t4; // y = 37;
t5 = &x;
t6 = *t5; // 55
t7 = t6 + 1; // 56;
*t5 = t7; // x = 56;
t8 = t4 + t7; // 93
*t1 = t8; // y = 93;

So by the end of this statement y has had three values: 36, 37 and 93. x has had two values: 55 and 56. y is now 93 and x is now 56.

I expected the output to be x = 57 and y = 94.

Why did you expect that? Your expectation was contrary to the C# specification; I would be interested to learn why you expected the wrong result. How did you expect the code for this to be generated? Did you expect the increments to happen after the assignment? Why would they do that? The increment happens when the value of the increment operator is evaluated, and obviously that has to happen before the addition, which obviously has to happen before the assignment. So the increment cannot happen after the assignment.

For some reason the post increment operator is not getting executed in line 3.

How on earth do you arrive at that conclusion? I assure you it most certainly is being executed. Step through the execution in a debugger if you don't believe me.

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1+, from the horse's mouth... –  SoftMemes Dec 12 '10 at 21:56
    
thanks for the detailed response.. our understanding of post-increment was wrong. x = y++ + x++; for us meant x = y + x; y = y + 1; x = x + 1; This way we arrived at 20 + 35; 35 + 1; 55 + 1; and since the last expression was on x we assumed it 56. –  stackoverflow Dec 13 '10 at 15:22

The order of execution is determined by operator precedence and associativity.

Assignment is right-associative, so

x = y + x++; 

can be rewritten

t = y + x++;
x = t;

I could not find a very clear statement for the fact that the ++ happens before the =.
But the text in § 14.2 of the Ecma document implies that the side-effect happens as part of evaluating i++ itself. In F(i) + G(i++) * H(i) , H(i) is called with the new value of i.

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Note however that the order of evaluation doesn't have to enforce a certain order of execution. –  SoftMemes Dec 12 '10 at 12:05
    
@Freed is correct. Order of execution of the operators is determined by precedence and associativity. Order of evaluation of subexpressions is left to right, always. –  Eric Lippert Dec 12 '10 at 15:29
2  
I note also that your claim about assignments is incorrect if "x" is an expression with a side effect. For example: M().x = y + N().x++ is NOT the same as t = y + N().x++; M().x = t; because that reverses the order in which M and N are called. –  Eric Lippert Dec 12 '10 at 15:31
    
@Eric, right, but x was clearly a var in the question. I wasn't going to stretch it too far. –  Henk Holterman Dec 12 '10 at 21:02

You may find this blog post interesting.

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