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I have an array of hashes that looks like this:

user_array = [<#Hashie::Mash id="1" name="Ben">, <#Hashie::Mash id="2" name="Scott">, <#Hashie::Mash id="3" name="David">]

And I also have an array that contains IDs pulled from an external source:

freq_array = ["1","2","2","3","2","3"]

I need to use freq_array to order user_array, so that the user whose ID appears the most in freq_array is first in the user_array. So based on the above freq_array, user_array would be

user_array = [<#Hashie::Mash id="2" name="Scott">, <#Hashie::Mash id="3" name="David">, <#Hashie::Mash id="1" name="Ben">]

What is the best way to do this? Thanks for reading.

EDIT: I got the format of the user_array hashes wrong. Have corrected.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted
user_array.sort_by { |user| freq_array.count(user["id"]) * -1 }
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user_array.sort_by { |user| -freq_array.count(user["id"]) } –  Nakilon Dec 12 '10 at 12:08
1  
that's shorter ;) I can make it more readable too: user_array.sort_by { |user| freq_array.count(user["id"]) }.reverse It is slower, but clearer what's going on imho –  iain Dec 12 '10 at 12:13
    
Thanks for the answers guys. The count is working okay, but the user_array isn't actually being ordered at all. I realised that each entry in the user_array actually looks slightly different to how I showed in the question. I've edited the question to reflect this. –  ben Dec 12 '10 at 12:22
    
Don't worry, got it working, stupid mistake by me. Thanks guys! –  ben Dec 12 '10 at 12:32
    
When using Enumerable#sort and sort_by I've always missed a "reverse" boolean option. –  tokland Dec 12 '10 at 13:29

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