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How to count the no of arguments passed to the function in following program:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdarg.h>
void varfun(int i, ...);
int main(){
        varfun(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6);
        return 0;
}
void varfun(int n_args, ...){
        va_list ap;
        int i, t;
        va_start(ap, n_args);
        for(i=0;t = va_arg(ap, int);i++){
               printf("%d", t);
        }
        va_end(ap);
}

This program's output over my gcc compiler under ubuntu 10.04:

234561345138032514932134513792

so how to find how many no. of arguments actually passed to the function?

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your program is working all right on my machine. It prints all the arguments passed to the function –  Shweta May 6 '11 at 10:08

6 Answers 6

You can't. Something else has to tell you (for instance for printf, it's implied by the number of % format descriptors in the format string)

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You can't. You have to manage for the caller to indicate the number of arguments somehow. You can:

  • Pass the number of argument in the first variable
  • Require the last variable argument to be null, zero or whatever
  • Make the first argument describe what is expected (eg. the printf format string dictates what arguments should follow)
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really?? can't i?? :( –  codeomnitrix Dec 12 '10 at 12:53
    
@codeomnitrix: it's sad but true. As a rule of thumb, stay away from variable length arguments. Unless you do C++0x. –  Alexandre C. Dec 12 '10 at 16:59
1  
For now, also stay away from C++0x. However the variadic templates in C++0x are really nice. –  Matt Joiner Dec 13 '10 at 13:37
    
@Matt: With variadic templates you can also write type safe variadic functions. –  Alexandre C. Dec 13 '10 at 13:51
    
@Alexandre C.: That's why I mentioned them... –  Matt Joiner Dec 13 '10 at 16:47

You can't. varargs aren't designed to make this possible. You need to implement some other mechanism to tell the function how many arguments there are. One common choice is to pass a sentinel argument at the end of the parameter list, e.g.:

varfun(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, -1);

Another is to pass the count at the beginning:

varfun(6, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6);

This is cleaner, but not as safe, since it's easier to get the count wrong, or forget to update it, than it is to remember and maintain the sentinel at the end.

It's up to you how you do it (consider printf's model, in which the format string determines how many — and what type — of arguments there are).

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If you have a C99 compliant compiler (including the preprocessor) you can circumvent this problem by declaring a macro that computes the number of arguments for you. Doing this yourself is a bit tricky, you may use P99_VA_ARGS from the P99 macro package to achieve this.

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Ok thanks, but much more beyond my c knowledge. I will try to understand this one –  codeomnitrix Dec 13 '10 at 6:43

Its possible and it is simple, just add another variable k in the loop and assign it initially 1, try this code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>

void varfun(int i, ...);

int main(){
        varfun(1,2);
        return 0;
}

void varfun(int n_args, ...)
        {
        va_list ap;
        int i, t, k;
        k = 1;
        va_start(ap, n_args);
        for(i=0;i <= va_arg(ap, int);i++){
               k+=1;
        }
        printf("%d",k);
        va_end(ap);
}
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k indicates the number of arguments passed to the function –  Faijz Jun 14 '12 at 23:34
1  
His program already has a variable i which is almost the same as k. k will always be i + 1. Also, your counter k is relying on his loop to go through the arguments correctly, but his loop is not correct (it runs past the end of the valid numbers) so your count will also not be correct. –  steveha Jun 15 '12 at 7:58
    
I tried this code by changing the number of input arguments that I am passing to the function and every-time I got correct answer..... –  Faijz Jun 15 '12 at 21:29

You could also use a meaningful value that indicates end of arguments. Like a 0 or -1. Or a max type size like 0xFFFF for a ushort.

Otherwise, you need to mention the count upfront or make it deductible from another argument (format for printf() like functions).

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