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I have a java program that allows new drawings to be made when a button is clicked , say each button is a circle with a number in it.

What i want to be able to do is that when I create 3 circles the number inside the circles I create is 1-3 but to do this I need to be able to track the amount of circle objects the user has already created.

I have thought about using InstanceOf but this seems like a Crude way of implementing it

Any Ideas Appreciated. Thanks Chris

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understood you correctly this is more of a design question rather than an implementation problem. Design is pretty important for all kinds of applications cause they help you to organise your code in a better way. Usually few hours of thinking before you write the first line of code will help you to save much more time later. I hope that my answer will answer your question.

Try thinking about it as a MVC application, where your components are the view layer, model would be a bean that stores the number of instances (or the references to them) and the controller would be a code triggered by the "events" from the view and model layers.

As mentioned in the answers above you will need a central point to access your data so you will need to make sure that there is only one bean representation of the UI state. This could be achieved either using singleton pattern as you've suggested, using static fields or by using a service provider facade to access the object, either of those will do the job. Of course you need to choose the method that suits your project best, over design is a bad thing as well ;)

You may want to do the tutorial for the PureMVC framework, it's a quite easy and lightweight. I would recommend at least doing the tutorial and going through the documentation so that you can understand the idea. You don't need to use it but it'll be good for the educational purposes.

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Singleton pattern was one which i was looking at the problem i face with this is that i may need a large number of the circle objects, therefore singleton may not be great? i can implement this by creating a place to hold the circle but this seems very crude and i thot there would be a better way to do this. –  Chris Dec 13 '10 at 14:11

I don't know how you designed your system. But what I would have is a central place where all my shapes are stored and can be added/removed. This store could then also be responsible for counting which objects it has created/removed and the way they are named.

I think the static variable is an easy solution if you don't plan to extend the program/don't have big requirements.

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Another way to do it, is to keep you Circle objects in an ArrayList, that way you can check how many circles there are by means of the .size() method. Another advantage is that you can easily alter/delete specific circles.

EDIT: Added bonus, the numbers you want represented in the circles are the indices of the circle + 1.

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Provided I am understanding your question correctly, all you need is a global (e.g. static) variable that gets incremented every time a Circle object gets created, e.g. from the constructor.

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Just use a static AtomicInteger which would keep track of your instance count for the Circles created. If you are feeling rather adventurous, you can also keep track of individual instances based on their ID by using a soft reference based static cache.

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If the number of circles can only increase (circles can't be removed) then you want to use a static variable in the Circle class to keep track of the number of times that the class has been instantiated.

i.e.:

public class Circle
{
    private static int numCircles = 0;
    private int circleId;

    public Circle()
    {
        // Preincrement the number of circles and assign this circle its ID.
        circleId = ++numCircles;
    }
}

Alternatively, if you are going to be adding and removing circles, you probably want to store them in a list, and pass in the number in the constructor.

i.e.:

public class Circle
{
    private int circleId;

    public Circle(int id)
    {
        circleId = id;
    }
}

public class Circles
{
    private static ArrayList<Circle> circleList = new ArrayList<Circle>();

    public static Circle getNewCircle()
    {
        Circle newCircle = new Circle(circleList.size() + 1);
        circleList.add(newCircle);
        return newCircle;
    }
}
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I think this design will lead to code duplication in the short term (OP will soon want to add squares, stars, ...) and hard to find bugs (when a circle is deleted, where to decrement the circle number? Who is responsible for this?) –  MarvinLabs Dec 12 '10 at 13:14
    
@MarvinLabs: Deleted? How do you delete an object in Java? Surely you meant going out of scope, right? In that case, the OP can use one of the reference types (soft, weak, phantom) to do the necessary cleanup. –  Sanjay T. Sharma Dec 12 '10 at 13:19
    
No, I meant deleted visually, which then will lead to 2 visible circles and the next one being named 1-4 instead of 1-3 as it should be. –  MarvinLabs Dec 12 '10 at 13:22
    
@Sanjay T. Sharma: MarvinLabs was implying that, if there were to be some way in the program to remove the circle (add/delete), then the number would have to be decremented. Not from a memory management / programatic point of view, but rather from a user using the app point of view. The implication that I got from the OP was that this wasn't going to happen, so I didn't bother to account for it. If you need to do that, storing them in an external List and using lst.size() would be the easiest method. –  Reese Moore Dec 12 '10 at 13:23
    
@Reese Moore: Indeed; I was under the impression that the number tracking logic required was more of a housekeeping thing (how many Circle instances are live at this moment) rather than an application logic thing in which case the point makes sense. –  Sanjay T. Sharma Dec 12 '10 at 13:30

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