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When I create a scalar INTEGER, s, and pass it to a subroutine, its value is being converted to a float and is horribly inaccurate. For example, if I set s = 2 and CALL print_my_int(s) where it will write(,) it out to the console, it's value shows up as 2.80259693E-45. Other scalar integers behave similarly, except in the case that s = 0, in which case, the output is 0.0000000. But even this is still wrong, as an integer should obviously not display a decimal and mantissa. This is NOT an output format issue, as I can get other integers to display properly when displayed locally.

Any clue as to what is happening here? Do I need to force the argument data type in the subroutine definition? Can this even be done?

Example Code:

PROGRAM print_int
   INTEGER  s
   s = 2
   CALL print_my_int(s)
END PROGRAM print_int

SUBROUTINE print_my_int(x)
   WRITE(*,*) x
END SUBROUTINE print_my_int

Resulting Output:

2.80259693E-45
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3 Answers 3

Another extended comment, simpler still than @steabert's:

PROGRAM print_int
   INTEGER  s
   s = 2
   CALL print_my_int(s)

CONTAINS

SUBROUTINE print_my_int(x)
   WRITE(*,*) x
END SUBROUTINE print_my_int

END PROGRAM print_int

By containing the subroutine in the program you coerce the compiler into making an explicit interface, saving 3 lines of code. By leaving the declaration of x within the subroutine implicit, the compiler spots the error.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Okay, premature post, but I'll leave it up for anyone who runs into the same. I'm not used to the syntax for enforcing parameter types in FORTRAN. In the subroutine definition, the data type of the parameter is below the name and parameter list. If not included, the GNU compiler doesn't warn or squawk. I imagine it's casting it to some other type by default. So, my above example should read like this...

PROGRAM print_int
   INTEGER  s
   s = 2
   CALL print_my_int(s)
END PROGRAM print_int

SUBROUTINE print_my_int(x)
   INTEGER  x
   WRITE(*,*) x
END SUBROUTINE print_my_int
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1  
It would also have worked if you changed the parameter name from x to i or j, because FORTRAN has type inference based on variable names' initial characters. But don't do that --- it's bad practice. –  JasonFruit Dec 12 '10 at 14:13
    
Thank you, sir. A handy tip, but I'll be mindful to avoid the malpractice. –  Old McStopher Dec 12 '10 at 14:16
3  
it's good to use the "implicit none" statement at the beginning of every program/subroutine if you want to make the compiler choke on non-declared variables. –  steabert Dec 12 '10 at 14:49
2  
Few friendly advices if I may. Always use "implicit none", it saves you a lot of hair (you not ripping it out) in this sort of cases. Also take a book (not an internet tutorial) on Fortran, and read the chapter that deals with scoping issues (it's almost always under program procedures - functions and subroutines). Splitting your programs into modules also helps avoiding this kind of problems (well, not exactly this kind but something similar). –  Rook Dec 12 '10 at 14:51
1  
I'm surprised that the compiler didn't at least warn you that the signature of your call to the subroutine didn't match the definition. –  High Performance Mark Dec 12 '10 at 15:08

Not anything new, just wanted to point out the use of an interface by providing some code which didn't fit in a comment:

As stated you can put implicit none everywhere at the beginning of the declaration section, or alternatively you can put an interface in your program which uses the subroutine, then the compiler will throw a type mismatch error:

PROGRAM print_int
INTERFACE
    SUBROUTINE print_my_int(x)
    END SUBROUTINE
END INTERFACE
INTEGER  s
s = 2
CALL print_my_int(s)
END PROGRAM print_int

SUBROUTINE print_my_int(x)
WRITE(*,*) x
END SUBROUTINE print_my_int
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