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OK here is what I have to do

As an employee of MCI (Mammoth Cakes Incorporated), it is your job to create extremely large layered birthday cakes. A layered birthday cake is made by taking small circular cakes layers and stacking them on top of each other.

To perform your job, you stand in front of a big conveyor belt while layers of varying sizes pass in front of you. When you see one you like, you may take it off the conveyor belt and add it to your cake.

You may add as many layers to your cake as you would like, as long as you follow these rules:

Once a layer is added to your cake it cannot be moved. (It messes up the icing.) Thus, layers can only be added to the top of your cake.

Each layer passes in front of you only once. You may take it or leave it. If you take it, you must add it to the top of your cake. If you leave it, it will move on down the conveyor belt, never to return.

Each layer in your cake must be at least as small as the layer below. You cannot place a larger layer on top of a smaller one.

You will be told in advance the diameters (in inches) of the layers coming down the conveyor belt. Your job is to create the tallest cake possible using those layers. For example, suppose the following list represents the diameters of the layers coming down the conveyor belt: 8 16 12 6 6 10 5

Suppose you take the first layer (with a diameter of 8”) for your cake. That means you may not take the second layer (since you already have a layer of size 8”, and 16” > 8”). Similarly, you could not take the third layer, but you could take the fourth layer (since 6” < 8”).

Following that, you could also take the fifth layer (the rule is simply that the layer on top cannot be larger; it can be the same size). Proceeding in this fashion we can create a cake with a height of 4 layers: 8 6 6 5 However, if we had let the first layer go on by and started with the second layer, we could create a cake with a height of 5: 16 12 6 6 5

Your program will process multiple input sets, one per line. Each line will begin with an integer N, followed by N positive integers representing the sizes of the cake layers in the order that they will be arriving on the conveyor belt. N will always be a non-negative integer, 0 N 100,000. Each layer will have a diameter between 1 and 100,000, inclusive. A line where N = 0 marks the end of the input

 Sample Input
7 8 16 12 6 6 10 5
10 45 25 40 38 20 10 32 25 18 30
10 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
0

Sample Output
5
6
10

Question: Find the tallest layer of Cakes

Here is what I have written so far:

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

public class cake
{
    private static String line;
    private static ArrayList storage = new ArrayList();
    private static Integer highestStack = 0;

    public static void main(String [] args)throws IOException
    {
          FileReader fin = new FileReader("cake.in");
        BufferedReader infile = new BufferedReader(fin);

        FileWriter fout = new FileWriter("cake.out");
        BufferedWriter outfile = new BufferedWriter(fout);


        line = infile.readLine();
        do
        {

            String[] temp = line.split(" ");
            String number;


                for(int j = temp.length-1; j!=0;  j--)
                {

                   if(Integer.parseInt(temp[j]) <= Integer.parseInt(temp[j-1]))
                   {
                       highestStack++;
                   }

                }

               storage.add(highestStack);
            //  Collections.sort(storage);



            line = infile.readLine();
        }while(!line.equals("0"));


        infile.close();
        outfile.close();

    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Looks like you are solving the problem (although I don't see where you output the answer). What is your question? –  DaveC Dec 12 '10 at 19:46
    
I'm not done with problem, this is only what I have written. The question is how do I come up with the tallest stack of cakes. –  Steffan Harris Dec 12 '10 at 19:48
    
@Steffan Harris: is this course about understand what dynamic programming is? If so, disregard all answers suggesting Java'ish solutions, they missed the dynamic programming tag. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 12 '10 at 21:10
    
@Steffan Harris: I'm adding that I can write a test case making all the non-dynamic-programming solutions suggested here fail miserably while the DP solution will laugh at the problem ;) –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 12 '10 at 21:12
    
@Webinator: Well its really an Algorithm class, and Dynamic Programming is just one of the topics we have done. Also, we have the option to write our programs in either Java or C++. I choose Java because I like the built in methods it has, especially when dealing with strings. All I really now about DP is that you store possible combination in some sort of data structure. –  Steffan Harris Dec 12 '10 at 21:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As I commented on several answers totally missing the point, this is a Dynamic Programming problem.

Now that you added the constraints, it is clear that a Dynamic Programming solution running in O(n^2) is the way to go, and the fact that N won't go above 100 000 makes it easy to solve using DP (and probably very hard to solve using non-DP algos).

At every moment, you have to ask yourself "What is the best I can do up to 'x'".

Here's how it looks like for you first example :

 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 (Best we can do using pieces: 5 )
 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 (Best we can do using pieces: 5 10 )
 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 (Best we can do using pieces: 5 10 6 )
 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 (Best we can do using pieces: 5 10 6 6 )
 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 (Best we can do using pieces: 5 10 6 6 12 )
 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 (Best we can do using pieces: 5 10 6 6 12 16 )
 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4[5] (Best we can do using pieces: 5 10 6 6 12 16 8 )

 Tallest cake as a height of: 5

The way to read a line above is easy. Let's take the first line for example:

0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

It means that the tallest cake we can make that has a base of anywhere from 5 to 16 is made of one element (our first piece, the '5').

Then we get the piece '10', and we get the line:

0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

It means that the tallest cake we can make from 5 to 9 will have one element (our '5') and that from 10 to 16 we can stuff two pieces (5 and 10).

And you repeat like that, with up to 100 000 elements if you want.

On my computer a full 100 000 solution takes less than 20 seconds to be solved using Dynamic Programming.

Here's the code solving your problems and outputting the above. I added output statements on purpose so that you can see what is going on (it will only look pretty with relatively small numbers that said, it is really just to get what is going on with the algorithm).

public static void main( String[] args ) {
    doIt( new int[] {8,16,12,6,6,10,5} );
    doIt( new int[] {0, 45, 25, 40, 38, 20, 10, 32, 25, 18, 30} ); 
    doIt( new int[] {10, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1} );
}

public static void doIt( int[] r ) {
    final int[] a= new int[r.length];
    int max = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
    for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        max = Math.max( max, a[i] );
        a[(a.length-1)-i] = r[i];
    }
    final int[] s = new int[max+1];
    for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        final int size = a[i];
        s[size]++;
        for (int j = size+1; j < s.length; j++) {
            s[j] = Math.max( s[j-1], s[j] );
        }
        for (int j = 0; j < s.length; j++) {
            System.out.print( " " + ((s[j]) > 9 ? "" : " ") + s[j] );
        }
        System.out.print( " (Best we can do using pieces: " );
        for (int k = 0; k <= i; k++) {
            System.out.print( a[k] + " " );
        }
        System.out.println( ")" );
    }
    System.out.println( "Tallest cake as a height of: " + s[s.length-1] );
}
share|improve this answer

I'm not certain what you're asking, exactly.. So, I'll give you some general hints.

Look into the Stack data structure, instead of an ArrayList. Push a layer onto the stack, and then use peek to check the diameter of the topmost layer of your cakestack against the current item in the conveyor.

If the goal is to find the tallest possible cake, a naive approach would be to simply apply the above algorithm by starting with the first layer in the conveyor, continuing to the end, and recording the ultimate height (stack.size()). Then repeat with the second item in the conveyor as your base, and then the third, and so on, comparing the resulting height against the recorded max at the conclusion of each loop.

share|improve this answer

Let's walk through the process. Each time we encounter a layer on the assembly line, we make a decision: use this layer or not? The best result overall is the better of the following two outcomes:

  • We use this layer, and build on top of it the tallest cake using the remaining layers not larger than this layer.

  • We don't use this layer, and build the tallest cake using any of the remaining layers.

We can model this simply with recursion - pseudocode:

tallest(remaining_layers, base_size) = # set base_size = infinity the first time
    max(
        first_layer + tallest(other_layers, size(first_layer)),
        tallest(other_layers, base_size)
    )
    where first_layer = first(remaining_layers),
          other_layers = rest(remaining_layers)

However, that won't cut it by itself, since we're supposed to use dynamic programming.

The idea is that we're recursively calling tallest with other_layers both times. Wouldn't it be nice if we could call it once, and have all the information we need?

What information do we need? Well, if we had the tallest cake using the remaining layers for any base size, we'd be set: we just pick the tallest cake that can fit on the current layer, and see if that makes an improvement versus the tallest cake overall. But here's the trick: even if it doesn't make an improvement, we may still gain information. The idea is to have a list of the most "efficient" (smallest base) cakes for each size.

Our process will therefore be as follows:

Set up a list of cakes, with one cake in it that has zero layers.
# There will be, at all times, one cake in the list of any given height.
# Starting at zero instead of one makes the iteration neater.
For each layer on the conveyor belt, working **backwards** from the last:
    Find the tallest cake in the list that fits on this layer.
    Construct the cake 'c' consisting of that cake on top of this layer.
    If there is already a cake in the list of the same height as 'c':
        If the other cake has a smaller base, throw 'c' away. # It didn't help.
        Otherwise, remove the other cake from the list. # 'c' is better.
    If we still have 'c', add it to the list.
The tallest possible cake for the input is now the tallest one in the list.
share|improve this answer

This input sequence is tricky:

10 45 25 40 38 20 10 32 25 18 30

A simplistic approach that only skips lead-in layers would find these [cakes]:

[10]  45   25   40   38   20   10   32   25   18   30 
 10  [45   25]  40   38   20   10   32   25   18   30
 10   45  [25]  40   38   20   10   32   25   18   30
 10   45   25  [40   38   20   10]  32   25   18   30   <-- naive tallest, 4
 10   45   25   40  [38   20   10]  32   25   18   30
 10   45   25   40   38  [20   10]  32   25   18   30
 10   45   25   40   38   20  [10]  32   25   18   30
 10   45   25   40   38   20   10  [32   25   18]  30
 10   45   25   40   38   20   10   32  [25   18]  30
 10   45   25   40   38   20   10   32   25  [18]  30
 10   45   25   40   38   20   10   32   25   18  [30]

The rules of the game allow you to skip any layer, though, not just the lead ones, and so the correct tallest cake in this case would be:

 10  [45]  25  [40] [38]  20   10  [32] [25] [18]  30 

Or written out with only the selected layers:

 45   40   38   32   25   18  
share|improve this answer
    
but that is not an answer at all is it? Also Dynamic Programming algorithms are not "naive" or "not naive", they're DP and aren't concerned by such mere details. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 12 '10 at 22:12

The problem you're trying to solve is a dynamic programming question (albeit a simple one).

Algorithm

public static int findMaxHeight(int[] layers) {
  int[] max = new int[layers.length];

  for(int i=layers.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    int localMax = 0;
    for(int j=0; j < layers.length; j++) {
      if(layers[j] < layers[i]) {
        if(max[j] > localMax) {
          localMax = max[j];
        }
      }
    }

    max[i] = localMax + 1;    
  }

  int height = 0;

  for(int i=0; i < max.length; i++) {
    if(max[i] > height) {
      height = max[i];
    }
  }

  return height;
}

Step By Step

As a step through of how this works, consider:

8 16 12 6 6 10 5

Since we are going in reverse order,

5 10 6 6 12 16 8

Starting with 5, there are smaller than 5 values from []:

5 10 6 6 12 16 8
1

From [5], max[5] = 1 so 1+1

5 10 6 6 12 16 8
1  2

And so on...

5 10 6 6 12 16 8
1  2 2 3  4  5 4

Then we find out max of the list [1, 2, 2, 3, 4, 5, 4], which is 5.

And, as explained above, this is the correct answer to the provided example that he stepped through in the problem description.


How It Works

The algorithm works by taking saving the maximum value for each layer. The question explains that, for any given layer, it can stack only cakes less than or equal to its diameter. Therefore, the maximum of any given layer will always be the maximum of a layer of equal or less size which follows it on the belt plus 1 (counting the layer itself). If there are no layers that can be stacked onto it, we know that the max for this layer is 1.

share|improve this answer
    
You have exactly the right idea but it would be good to explain how it works. Between this and my answer (which tries to explain things at a higher level, while skipping the implementation details) the OP should be satisfied. :) –  Karl Knechtel Dec 12 '10 at 21:51
1  
Thank you for posting. Their are no incorrect problems in this solution because the first number on the belt is not apart of it; it just tells how many cakes are coming down the conveyor belt –  Steffan Harris Dec 12 '10 at 21:57
    
@Steffan Ooops, sorry. I fixed it in the answer. –  Ian Bishop Dec 12 '10 at 22:51

Actually is very simple, it goes like this:

int[] layers = new int[] {x1,x2,x3...xn};    
int[] count = new int[layers.length];

for(int i = 1; i < layers.length; i++)
{             
       for(int j = i+1 ; j < layers.length; j++)
       {
         if ( layers[j] >= layers[i]) count[i]++; 
       }     
 }

 answer = Collections.max(Arrays.asList(count));
share|improve this answer
    
this has syntax errors. –  Steffan Harris Dec 13 '10 at 2:43

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