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I am new in java development! May someone tell me... according to which logic super.onDestroy(); in destructors goes on top? for example:

protected void onDestroy() {        
    super.onDestroy();
    releaseMediaPlayer();
}

and not

protected void onDestroy() {        
    releaseMediaPlayer();
    super.onDestroy();
}

like c++, obj-c, pascal, etc ??

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3 Answers 3

up vote 30 down vote accepted

It really depends on what you want to do in your onDestroy. This is what super.onDestroy does (in that order):

  • Dismiss any dialogs the activity was managing.
  • Close any cursors the activity was managing.
  • Close any open search dialog

If the logic you put inside onDestroy has something to do with those three things that android does, then you may have to worry about the order. Otherwise, and in most of the cases, it does not matter.

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1  
where did you find this information? i'm curious about services, etc. –  Jon Willis Dec 12 '10 at 22:07
    
Android is OpenSouce... just take a look at the source code :P –  Cristian Dec 12 '10 at 22:30

What's your question? You can do it either way, it depends if you want your superclass's onDestroy() called before yours. Usually I don't think it matters in android.

Also, onDestroy() isn't a destructor. It doesn't actually destroy the object. It's just a method that's called based on a certain state. So your instance is still alive and very well* after the superclass's onDestroy() runs and returns.

*Most likely, android is free to kill the activity at any time, but you can assume it's still there.

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1  
in c++ for example you destroy the super class after you are done with cleaning up your private objects. if you destroy the super class first, I don't think it is a good practice, I even think that the app will crash since the instance will be destroyed! –  VassilisGr Dec 12 '10 at 20:05
    
I edited my answer –  Falmarri Dec 12 '10 at 20:11
    
As he said, this isn't a destructor, just telling the component to clean up any state it wants to. The object still remains after the onDestroy() call. Generally the order doesn't matter, and won't cause a crash. –  hackbod Dec 13 '10 at 7:21

In the ThreadSample.zip on the Reporting Work Status training, there is a comment in onDestroy()

public void onDestroy() {
    ...
    // Must always call the super method at the end.
    super.onDestroy();
}

So perhaps when using Broadcast Receivers, the super must go at the end.

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