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I am writing a problem to solve Job schedules but I am having a hard time understanding how.

The Wood Shop has a backlog of orders for its world famous rocking chair (1 chair per order). There are several steps involved in making a handmade Baber Rocking chair (eg. cutting wood pieces, assembly, sanding, applying a stain, and applying varnish).

The total time required to make a chair is 1 week. However, since the chairs are sold in different regions and various markets, the amount of profit for each order may differ. In addition, there is a deadline associated with each order. The company will only earn a profit if they meet the deadline; otherwise, the profit is 0.

Write a program that will determine an optimal schedule for the orders that will maximize profit. The input file will contain one or more test cases. The first line in a test case will contain an integer, n (0 n 1000), that represents the number of orders that are pending.

A value of 0 for n indicates the end of the input file. The next n lines contain 3 positive integers each. The first integer, i, is an order number.

All order numbers for a given test case are unique. The second integer represents the number of weeks from now until the deadline for i th order. The third integer represents the amount of profit that the company will earn if the deadline is met for the i th order.

What I am asking for is an algorithm of how I should go about solving this problem.

For each test case in the input file, the output file should output a line that reports the amount of profit that results from completing the orders in an optimal order.

Example Input File (sched.in)
7
1 3 40
2 1 35
3 1 30
4 3 25
5 1 20
6 3 15
7 2 10
4
3054 2 30
4099 1 35
3059 2 25
2098 1 40
0
Example Output File (sched.out)
100
70
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4  
What have you done so far? (Nothing that I can see.) It must be the end of the semester - lots of "do my homework for me" questions today. "I am having a hard time understanding how" - I guess that's the point of your class. Try writing some code. Read in the file; write out the file. An Order class. C'mon! Something! Anything. –  duffymo Dec 12 '10 at 20:07
2  
if you have trouble understanding how your porgram is running I suggest you use a debugger to step through your program and see what it is doing. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 12 '10 at 20:12
    
Removed the C++ tag, as the title specifies in Java. –  Puppy Dec 12 '10 at 20:29
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The postulate of your problem is incomplete. It is required to know ho many chairs can you make per week. Maybe you can make all at once. But let's assume you can make only one. The solution is like this.

based on the very smart comments of Cameron Skinner I change my answer to this:

public class tarea
{         
    List<input> datas = new ArrayList<input>();

     class input
     {
         public int profit;
         public int deadline;
         public int index1;
         public int index2;
         public int sum() {return index1+index2;}
        /**
         * @param profit
         * @param deadline
         */
        public input(int deadline, int profit)
        {
            super();
            this.profit = profit;
            this.deadline = deadline;
        } 

     }


     public void readData1()
     {
         this.datas.add(new input(1,1));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,1));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,1));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,1));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,1));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,1));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,1));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,1));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,1));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,1));
         this.datas.add(new input(10,1000));
         this.datas.add(new input(10,1000));
         this.datas.add(new input(10,1000));
         this.datas.add(new input(10,1000));
         this.datas.add(new input(10,1000));
         this.datas.add(new input(10,1000));
         this.datas.add(new input(10,1000));
         this.datas.add(new input(10,1000));
         this.datas.add(new input(10,1000));
         this.datas.add(new input(10,1000));
     }


     public void readData2()
     {/*
         3 40
         2 1 35
         3 1 30
         4 3 25
         5 1 20
         6 3 15
         7 2 10 */

         this.datas.add(new input(3,40));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,35));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,30));
         this.datas.add(new input(3,25));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,20));
         this.datas.add(new input(3,15));
         this.datas.add(new input(2,10));
     }

     public void readData3()
     {/*
     2 30
     4099 1 35
     3059 2 25
     2098 1 40*/

         this.datas.add(new input(2,30));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,35));
         this.datas.add(new input(2,25));
         this.datas.add(new input(1,40));
     }



     @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public void sortbyprofit(List<input> datas)
     {
         Collections.sort(datas, new Comparator() {

            public int compare(Object o1, Object o2)
            {
                if(((input)(o1)).profit < ((input)(o2)).profit)
                    return 1;
                else if(((input)(o1)).profit == ((input)(o2)).profit)
                    return 0;
                else return -1;
            }});
     }

     @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
     public void sortbydeadline(List<input> datas)
      {
          Collections.sort(datas, new Comparator() {

             public int compare(Object o1, Object o2)
             {
                 if(((input)(o1)).deadline > ((input)(o2)).deadline)
                     return 1;
                 else if(((input)(o1)).deadline == ((input)(o2)).deadline)
                     return 0;
                 else return -1;
             }});
      }


     @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
     public void sortbySum(List<input> datas)
      {
          Collections.sort(datas, new Comparator() {

             public int compare(Object o1, Object o2)
             {
                 if(((input)(o1)).sum() > ((input)(o2)).sum())
                     return 1;
                 else if(((input)(o1)).sum() == ((input)(o2)).sum())
                     return 0;
                 else return -1;
             }});
      }


    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        tarea tsk = new tarea();
        //tsk.readData1();
        //tsk.readData2();
        tsk.readData3();


        while (tsk.datas.size() > 0)
        {
            //sort by profit
            tsk.sortbyprofit(tsk.datas);
            int idx0 = 1;
            //assign index
            for (input data : tsk.datas)
            {
                data.index1 = idx0;
                idx0++;
            }

            //sort by deadline
            tsk.sortbydeadline(tsk.datas);
            int idx2 = 1;
            for (input data : tsk.datas)
            {
                data.index2 = idx2;
                idx2++;
            }

            //sort by sum and profit
            tsk.sortbySum(tsk.datas);

            List<input> tmpdatas = new ArrayList<input>();
            int valsum = tsk.datas.get(0).sum();
            for (input data : tsk.datas)
            {
                if (data.sum() == valsum)
                    tmpdatas.add(data);
            }            
            tsk.sortbyprofit(tmpdatas);

            //get the first one as result
            input thedata = tmpdatas.get(0);

            System.out.println("result ===> " + thedata.profit);

            tsk.datas.remove(thedata);
            tmpdatas = new ArrayList<input>();
            for (input data : tsk.datas)
            {
                data.deadline--;
                if (data.deadline > 0)
                    tmpdatas.add(data);
            }
            tsk.datas = tmpdatas;
        }


    }


}
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This algorithm is incorrect. Consider two jobs: Job 1 pays 10, deadline 1; Job 2 pays 50, deadline 2. Your algorithm will pick job 2 as the first job, then terminate. The optimal solution is to do both jobs. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 15 '10 at 23:35
    
Cameron: you are right. This fix that problem: 1- order the data per deadline first an then profit. 2- pick the first two groups 3- order by profit 4- pick 2 first elements 5- order descending by deadline 6- Execute the first one 7- remove served order 8- remove expired orders 9- go to step 2 –  Hector Caicedo Dec 16 '10 at 5:44
    
Nope, still doesn't work. Consider 10 jobs with deadlines 1 through 10, each with payoff 1. Also another 10 jobs all with deadline 10 and payoff 1000. Optimal solution is to do the last 10 jobs. Rememeber, job-shop is NP-hard so (in general) to get an optimal solution you need to explore all possible orderings. There are some shortcuts that can be taken but it's hard to get them right. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 16 '10 at 9:47
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There are a bunch of ways to solve the job shop problem. Start by reading the wikipedia entry, then pick up a good book on algorithm design. Your professor can probably recommend one. I suspect dynamic programming would be a good way to approach this but there will be other approaches too.

This is a difficult problem so don't expect an easy answer. Many people are still researching ways to solve this problem efficiently.

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Welcome to the wonderful world of NP complete planning problems. Once you scale out, it's impossible to find the optimal solution in our lifetimes. That doesn't matter though, you just have to find the best solution in the given time (beating human planners and other software programs).

Don't write these algorithms yourself (unless you're an expert with years of experience). Use an off the shelf library which specialize in these kind of problems, such as:

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Okay, Java is not the problem here. Instead of concentrating on the language, think about the algorithm.

This "tastes" like something where there is a dynamic programming solution, but from this I'm kind of inferring you're a beginner, so an exhaustive search is probably easier as long as the number of orders is reasonable. In an exhaustive search, you'd simply lay out each possible order and save the most profitable one.

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