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I keep having issues with including basic headers such as cmath. It is most prevalent when using example projects. Example:

#include <cmath>

for instance gets a file not found, even though I can verify that the SDK I'm using has it:

/Developer/Platforms/iPhoneOS.platform/Developer/SDKs/iPhoneOS4.2.sdk/usr/include/c++/4.2.1/tr1/cmath

I can sometimes work around the issue by importing directly to the file, but this doesn't always work.

#include </usr/include/c++/4.2.1/cmath>
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All points to C++, C tag replaced –  pmg Dec 12 '10 at 21:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What is the extension of your sourcecode file? .m or .mm? If it's .m, the compiler will assume you have a regular objective-C file, whereas .mm would imply an objective-C++ file. If its not a .mm file, the compiler may not be looking for C++ includes.

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This most recent occurrence is in an .hpp file. I've had these issues before, and I'd think something isn't set up right in my build configuration except for the fact that this happens with a wiped install of XCode and a clean project. –  akaru Dec 13 '10 at 0:45
    
...although, when I renamed the class that included the above .hpp class to have an .mm extension, it worked! I didn't realize the compiler directives would change with the extension change. Thanks! –  akaru Dec 13 '10 at 1:02
    
As a follow-up: This works fine with an Objective-C++ .mm file. However, I am using Interface Builder, and it does not want to play nicely with my view controller being a .mm file. I get compiler segmented errors. Any tips for such a use case? I'm not one to use IB, but the UI is complex enough to benefit from it. –  akaru Dec 13 '10 at 4:33
    
Added as a new question: stackoverflow.com/questions/4425938/… –  akaru Dec 13 '10 at 5:03
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I've had this problem and it was due to having a C++ header file being (through a chain of C++ classes) included in an Objective-C .m file. –  Piku Nov 26 '11 at 16:54

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