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public static T Get<T>() where T : class
{
    string implName = Program.Settings[typeof(T).Name].ToString();
    object concrete = Activator.CreateInstance(Type.GetType(implName));

    return (T)concrete;
}

Please explain what does Get() where T means?

Welcome to put some reading URLs.

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2  
Just a note that this code looks very fragile to me. If you call it with a type that doesn't have a key in settings, it will throw an exception. –  Joel Coehoorn Dec 13 '10 at 3:09
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is an example of a generic. 'T' represents a type.

For example:

string result = Get<string>();

Do a Google search on Generics. This will get you started: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms379564(v=vs.80).aspx

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1  
Aw, save a coder a ctrl+c/v. Make it a direct link. ;-) –  Brad Christie Dec 13 '10 at 2:46
2  
the first example will throw a compiler error because int is not a reference type. You should mention here the importance of the where constraint (or remove the first example) –  RPM1984 Dec 13 '10 at 2:52
    
@brad goo.gl/nLUyy :) –  Pauli Østerø Dec 13 '10 at 3:18
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This will constrain T to be a reference type in this particular case.

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The where T : class puts a constrain on what types are allowed for T. This will

  1. Give you an compiler error if you put in a wrong type
  2. Give you access to access methods/properties or instantiate instances of T based on the constraint

So for your method this will produce an error if you call it like this Get<int>() since int is not a class.

public static T Get<T>() where T : class
{
    string implName = Program.Settings[typeof(T).Name].ToString();
    var implType = Type.GetType(implName);

    return (T)Activator.CreateInstance(implType);
}
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That will not compile. No such overload exists. –  SLaks Dec 13 '10 at 2:59
    
ah yes... my bad, the T and type argument is ambiguous. –  Pauli Østerø Dec 13 '10 at 3:10
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