Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

All valid words that must have even number of a's or even number of b's

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Gabe, Muad'Dib, codaddict, Jim Lewis, Michael Petrotta Dec 13 '10 at 7:12

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Is this a request to get us to do your homework for you? –  Gabe Dec 13 '10 at 7:11
2  
This is not a question. I suppose by including the tag "regex", we were supposed to figure out that you wanted us to write you a regular expression that fulfills your stated requirements? Sorry, Stack Overflow is not a "give me teh codez" website. –  Cody Gray Dec 13 '10 at 7:13
    
Gabe and CodyGray your both attitude is not good. See Austin reply. He did not write regular expression but guide me in right direction. that is +ive attitude. –  raoisrar Dec 13 '10 at 7:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would recommend this site: http://rubular.com/. Its a sandbox for Regular Expressions where you can play around with them. It should help you solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
1  
thanks Austin L. Tt is good way to guide. It is very helpful. –  raoisrar Dec 13 '10 at 7:27

You cannot do this with one regular expression. For one word you'd need to do something like

if ((replace(/[^Aa]/g, "").length & 1) == 0)

Of course this highly depends on your programming language (the above would work in JavaScript)

share|improve this answer
1  
It's a regular language (a DFA with only four states is sufficient), so it most certainly can be recognized by a single regex. –  Jim Lewis Dec 13 '10 at 7:35

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.