Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've a weird issue with MS access 2007. If I run the following query:

SELECT QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS.*, QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND.*
FROM QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS
INNER JOIN QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND
ON QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS.concat = QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND.concat

It works, no troubles, then I want to include missing records with left/right join so I run:

SELECT QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS.*, QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND.*
FROM QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS
INNER JOIN QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND
ON QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS.concat = QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND.concat
UNION ALL
SELECT QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS.*, QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND.*
FROM QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS
LEFT JOIN QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND
ON QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS.concat = QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND.concat
WHERE QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS.concat IS NULL
UNION ALL
SELECT QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS.*, QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND.*
FROM QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS
RIGHT JOIN QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND
ON QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS.concat = QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND.concat
WHERE QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND.concat IS NULL

And I get: too many fields defined

I don't understand... I'm selecting the exact amount of fields, where is this error coming from guys?

Thanks in advance Cheers

share|improve this question
    
try using an explicit column list... –  Mitch Wheat Dec 13 '10 at 10:45
    
Hi Mitch, the thing is that I've a very very long list lol In fact, if I try with only one or two fields it works, but not if I include everything –  CoolStraw Dec 13 '10 at 10:48
    
with no disrespect to either MS or yourself, Access is not a full-featured database product. It is intended for simple uses by non-technical users and does this well - but too often such products get used for things they're not designed for. If you're trying to do simulate a full join (as described below) you are clearly technically sophisticated, and you deserve to use a better database product. I strongly suggest that you try another database that can do this job better and easier. –  Bob Jarvis Dec 13 '10 at 12:26
    
Hi Bob, no offense at all, what you're saying is right and straight forward. The only thing you don't know is that MS access is a business requirement in my project, so I can't use another database, I've to stick to it and well... to make it work somehow :). Thank you for your highlight though ;) –  CoolStraw Dec 13 '10 at 13:26
    
@Bob Jarvis: while Access can indeed be used by novice users, it's also a powerful development platform that developers who aren't novices can do a lot with. Jet/ACE is the database engine, and it does have its limitations (and its own SQL dialect), but those are not really relevant here. The data schema is a bad design, seems to me. –  David-W-Fenton Dec 19 '10 at 2:28
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Maybe the problem has nothing to do with your JOINS, but with your UNIONS!

I Googled your error message and found this: http://www.mvps.org/access/tables/tbl0002.htm. Given that you have so many fields... Maybe that's the problem? Note that the various articles talk about MS Access's INTERNAL field count. Maybe the various UNION ALL clauses are limited by that internal field count

share|improve this answer
    
I tried compacting the table... but it didn't fix anything over there –  CoolStraw Dec 13 '10 at 11:10
    
What does "compacting" mean? And how many fields do you get, when you select * from both tables? –  Lukas Eder Dec 13 '10 at 11:12
    
I have 199 fields. And compacting is a tool in database that resets fields counters (because if you drop a column for example it doesn't get decreased, so the compact is a way of cleaning rabbish out of the database) –  CoolStraw Dec 13 '10 at 11:18
    
As a test case, could you just explicitly select 1-2 fields from each table and use them in the UNIONs to see if that would work? Otherwise, I agree, that I might be on the wrong track... :) –  Lukas Eder Dec 13 '10 at 11:29
2  
Anyone needing 200 fields has a schema error. Certainly we all sometimes have to deal with some pile of crap that some idiot created and we have to live with, but the problem here is simply bad design. There may or may not be workarounds -- it's hard to say since the actual requirements are not outlined. –  David-W-Fenton Dec 19 '10 at 2:31
show 3 more comments

I don't know if this helps, but I don't think you would get any results from a left-join query that requires the left join column to be null, and the same for a right-join query where the right join column is null, which seems to be what's going on here. Maybe try switching the left and right joins?

share|improve this answer
    
When I execute the left/right joins separately I get the expected result actually –  CoolStraw Dec 13 '10 at 11:10
    
That would support the idea, that the problem lies in the UNIONS... –  Lukas Eder Dec 13 '10 at 11:13
    
Indeed ! Just got the confirmation... The UNION sees my select as 2 * 200... so 400 columns... This is really dumbass... Thank you guys I'm gonna try to find out another way of solving this... –  CoolStraw Dec 13 '10 at 11:36
    
Good luck, then! –  Lukas Eder Dec 13 '10 at 12:15
add comment

Take a look at this article. It explains pretty well all the different joins.

In your case why don't you use a full outer join ?

SELECT QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS.*, QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND.*
FROM QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS
FULL OUTER JOIN QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND
ON QUERY_LNK_ORDERS_ITEMS.concat = QUERY_LNK_ERASALES_ERACOND.concat
share|improve this answer
    
MS Access has no OUTER JOIN unfortunately, and the way I'm doing things in my query is the how to simulate the full outer join actually :) –  CoolStraw Dec 13 '10 at 11:11
    
Alright. Sorry I did not know ! –  Spredzy Dec 13 '10 at 11:14
    
No problem at all thank you for your attempt though :) –  CoolStraw Dec 13 '10 at 11:19
add comment

Since you've found that the problem is with the UNIONs (comment on Spiny Norman's answer), I think your only optionis going to be a temporary table (though you might want to define its structure premanently, then insure that valid uses always clear it before repopulating). Then run each of your queries as an insert (maybe with the first as a make-table if you don't go with permanent structure), and select from that for your final result.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.