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I have a list view that is periodically updated (every 60 seconds). It was anoying to me that i would get a flicker every time it up dated. The method being used was to clear all the items and then recreate them. I decided to instead of clearing the items I would just write directly to the cell with the new text. Is this a better approach or does anyone have a better solution.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 64 down vote accepted

The ListView control has a flicker issue. The problem appears to be that the control's Update overload is improperly implemented such that it acts like a Refresh. An Update should cause the control to redraw only its invalid regions whereas a Refresh redraws the control’s entire client area. So if you were to change, say, the background color of one item in the list then only that particular item should need to be repainted. Unfortunately, the ListView control seems to be of a different opinion and wants to repaint its entire surface whenever you mess with a single item… even if the item is not currently being displayed. So, anyways, you can easily suppress the flicker by rolling your own as follows:

class ListViewNF : System.Windows.Forms.ListView
{
    public ListViewNF()
    {
        //Activate double buffering
        this.SetStyle(ControlStyles.OptimizedDoubleBuffer | ControlStyles.AllPaintingInWmPaint, true);

        //Enable the OnNotifyMessage event so we get a chance to filter out 
        // Windows messages before they get to the form's WndProc
        this.SetStyle(ControlStyles.EnableNotifyMessage, true);
    }

    protected override void OnNotifyMessage(Message m)
    {
        //Filter out the WM_ERASEBKGND message
        if(m.Msg != 0x14)
        {
            base.OnNotifyMessage(m);
        }
    }
}

From: Geekswithblogs.net

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You have to know that the downside of this solution (due to the double buffering) is that updating the control is significantly slower (try adding a 1000 items). –  Sandor Drieënhuizen Jul 9 '10 at 14:04
1  
To be honest, I never use the winforms listview. But isn't that perfomance loss away when you call SuspendLayout and ResumeLayout? –  Stormenet Jul 9 '10 at 15:14
1  
+1 Works great with custom background color, –  Fedearne Nov 10 '10 at 23:37
2  
The OptimizedDoubleBuffer does it work properly. But I don't think skipping the call to base.OnNotifyMessage(m) helps in any way. I just checked with ILSpy and Control.OnNotifyMessage has an empty implementation. From MSDN: "When overriding OnNotifyMessage in a derived class, calling the base class's OnNotifyMessage method is not necessary because there is no initial implementation." This method is there so subclasses can be notified when messages are processed. If you need to alter those messages, you need to override WndProc ? –  toong Sep 10 '12 at 14:44
2  
If you don't like this solution, because of subclassing, here is very similar without subclassing: stackoverflow.com/questions/87795/… –  prostynick Nov 14 '12 at 13:56

In addition to the other replies, many controls have a [Begin|End]Update() method that you can use to reduce flickering when editing the contents - for example:

    listView.BeginUpdate();
    try {
        // listView.Items... (lots of editing)
    } finally {
        listView.EndUpdate();
    }
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+1: Thanks; this made a noticable difference :-) –  Jon Cage Jul 15 '10 at 14:14
    
Huge thanks! I've been searching the Internet up and down, and none of the search results are applicable :D –  pepoluan Apr 25 '11 at 0:24

Yes, make it double buffered. It will reduce the flicker ;) http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.forms.listview.doublebuffered.aspx

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1  
-1: You can't set a ListViews DoubleBuffered property (it's protected). –  Jon Cage Jul 15 '10 at 14:17
1  
-1 to your comment because you CAN set it, if you derive a new class from it, there is also the "SetStyle" method. But way to do your research before down voting somebody, even when you answered using the exact reason your comment makes no sense thumbs up –  SilverX Feb 7 '13 at 0:29
    
just remember, SetStyle is protected too... how did you managed to call that? –  SilverX Feb 7 '13 at 0:36
1  
You didn't mention anything about derivation in your answer.. –  Jon Cage Feb 8 '13 at 14:10

Excellent question and Stormenent's answer was spot on. Here's a C++ port of his code for anyone else who might be tackling C++/CLI implementations.

#pragma once

#include "Windows.h" // For WM_ERASEBKGND

using namespace System;
using namespace System::Windows::Forms;
using namespace System::Data;
using namespace System::Drawing;

public ref class FlickerFreeListView : public ListView
{
public:
    FlickerFreeListView()
    {
        //Activate double buffering
        SetStyle(ControlStyles::OptimizedDoubleBuffer | ControlStyles::AllPaintingInWmPaint, true);

        //Enable the OnNotifyMessage event so we get a chance to filter out 
        // Windows messages before they get to the form's WndProc
        SetStyle(ControlStyles::EnableNotifyMessage, true);
    }

protected:
    virtual  void OnNotifyMessage(Message m) override
    {
        //Filter out the WM_ERASEBKGND message
        if(m.Msg != WM_ERASEBKGND)
        {
            ListView::OnNotifyMessage(m);
        }
    }

};
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Try setting the double buffered property in true.

Also you could use:

this.SuspendLayout();

//update control

this.ResumeLayout(False);

this.PerformLayout();
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Layout mainly applies when moving/resizing things... I suspect you mean [Begin|End]Update, as per my reply. –  Marc Gravell Jan 14 '09 at 13:00

If this can help, the following component solved my ListView flickering issues with .NET 3.5

[ToolboxItem(true)]
[ToolboxBitmap(typeof(ListView))]
public class ListViewDoubleBuffered : ListView
{
    public ListViewDoubleBuffered()
    {
        this.DoubleBuffered = true;
    }
}

I use it in conjonction with .BeginUpdate() and .EndUpdate() methods where I do ListView.Items manipulation.

I don't understand why this property is a protected one...even in the .NET 4.5 (maybe a security issue)

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Simple solution

yourlistview.BeginUpdate()

//Do your update of adding and removing item from the list

yourlistview.EndUpdate()
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