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I need to create a number of classes (more than 50) from a base class, where the only difference is in the names of the derived classes.

For example, my base class is defined as:

class BaseError : public std::exception
{
private:
    int osErrorCode;
    const std::string errorMsg;

public:
    int ec;
    BaseError () : std::exception(), errorMsg() {}

    BaseError (int errorCode, int osErrCode, const std::string& msg)
         : std::exception(), errorMsg(msg)
    {
       ec = errorCode;
       osErrorCode = osErrCode;
    }

    BaseError (const BaseError& other)
        : std::exception(other), errorMsg(other.errorMsg)
    {
        ec  = other.errorCode;
        osErrorCode = other.osErrorCode;
    }

    const std::string& errorMessage() const { return errorMsg; }

    virtual ~BaseError() throw(){}

}

I have to create a lot of derived classes from this base class each having its own constructors, copy constructor and the virtual destructor function, currently I am copying/pasting the code changing the names where necessary :

class FileError : public BaseError{
private:
    const std::string error_msg;

public:
    FileError () :BaseError(), error_msg() {}

    FileError (int errorCode, int osErrorCode, const std::string& errorMessage)
        :BaseError(errorCode, osErrorCode, errorMessage){}

    virtual ~FileError() throw(){}
};

Question: Is there some way to have these classes created using templates so the implementation is not repeated ?

share|improve this question
1  
Slightly unrelated comment: instead of providing your own const std::string& errorMessage() const getter you might want to reimplement the virtual const char *std::exception::what() const function you're getting by inheriting std::exception. –  Frerich Raabe Dec 13 '10 at 11:55
2  
why do you require derived classes ? Won't a simple typedef is not sufficient? As far I see there is nothing useful done in derived classes. –  Naveen Dec 13 '10 at 11:55
    
If the behaviour of your derived classes remain the same then whey not go for templatized class? –  Quizzical Dec 13 '10 at 11:57
1  
Another remotely related comment: if all your exceptions (can) have a message, consider just having one std::string errorMsg; member in your base class instead of having one in the base class and then one per derived class. This is a bit more efficient (in terms of memory and runtime speed). You could set the string member variable by provoding a (protected) setter, or by passing an argument to the base class constructor. –  Frerich Raabe Dec 13 '10 at 11:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I suppose you want to create a class hierarchy so that you can use dynamic dispatch in your catch clauses (relying on the compiler to find out the correct type) to implement custom error handling. You could do this by keeping the BaseError class as it is and then adding a template class for which you then provide multiple instantiations. Consider this:

class BaseError : public std::exception
{
private:
    int osErrorCode;
    const std::string errorMsg;

public:
    int ec;
    BaseError () : std::exception(), errorMsg() {}

    BaseError (int errorCode, int osErrCode, const std::string& msg)
         : std::exception(), errorMsg(msg)
    {
       ec = errorCode;
       osErrorCode = osErrCode;
    }

    // ...
};

template <int T>
class ConcreteError : public BaseError {
public:
    ConcreteError () :BaseError(), error_msg() {}

    ConcreteError (int errorCode, int osErrorCode, const std::string& errorMessage)
        :BaseError(errorCode, osErrorCode, errorMessage){}
};

You can now set up a few type definitions:

typedef ConcreteError<0> FileError;
typedef ConcreteError<1> NetworkError;
typedef ConcreteError<2> DatabaseError;
// ...

You now have a hierarchy with three distinct error classes.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this, very elegant (especially that you always later give specific exceptions their own implementation without breaking this scheme). Only thing to add is, the integer values should be either named constants or part of an enumeration. :) –  Mephane Dec 13 '10 at 12:16
    
Does this allow throwing exceptions from a shared library ? –  Alexandre C. Dec 13 '10 at 12:39
    
@Mephane: What would named constants or an enumeration give you in this case? You just need to have distinct classes - you will never refer to them by ID, so you don't need names for the IDs. –  Frerich Raabe Dec 13 '10 at 13:02
    
Well, you could have the enumeration be e.g. { FILE, NETWORK, DATABASE, ... } and rename ConcreteError as just Error, and skip the typedefs in favour of just using e.g. Error<FILE>. :) –  Karl Knechtel Dec 13 '10 at 13:11
    
@Frerich Raabe: This is really the most elegant solution. I just have one question, should the id numbers be unique for the typedefs? Or does it make any difference if I just use the same number for all of them ? Also, thanks a lot for looking at my code in detail. I will definitely be working on your suggestions. –  sarshad Dec 13 '10 at 13:46

If the implementations are identical, make an enum, and template on it.

enum error {
    file_error,
};
template<error e> class my_exception : public BaseError {
    ....
};
typedef my_exception<file_error> file_exception;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 For the enumeration. –  Palmik Dec 13 '10 at 12:33
    
Why bother using named constants or an enumeration in this case? You just need to have distinct classes - you will never refer to them by ID, so you don't need names for the IDs. You always only use the typedefs. –  Frerich Raabe Dec 13 '10 at 13:03
    
@Frerich: Nothing wrong with being able to refer to them by enumeration. It's an extra advantage for this solution. –  Puppy Dec 13 '10 at 14:41

If the implementation is exactly same, and you just want different name for each class, then simple typedef would do your job.

And if there is slight difference in implementation though not in interface, then you may probably need templates. Then consider also policy based design.

share|improve this answer

Why templates ? I'd go with macros.

#define IMPLEMENT_ERROR(str) \
class str##Error : public BaseError{ \
private: \
    const std::string error_msg; \
 \
public: \
    str##Error () :BaseError(), error_msg() {} \
 \
    str##Error (int errorCode, int osErrorCode, const std::string& errorMessage) \
        :BaseError(errorCode, osErrorCode, errorMessage){} \
 \
    virtual ~str##Error() throw(){} \
}

IMPLEMENT_ERROR(File);
IMPLEMENT_ERROR(Runtime);
...
share|improve this answer
4  
I certainly wouldn't. –  Puppy Dec 13 '10 at 12:03
2  
Seems the template solution is better is almost all ways –  Elemental Dec 13 '10 at 12:19
2  
Template solution seems to be more clean and understandable –  Quizzical Dec 13 '10 at 12:53
2  
Macros? What are you, C user? –  Pawel Zubrycki Dec 13 '10 at 13:05

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