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I have a file with a set of functions. For one of the functions, I want to write a helper function which basically takes a char * and skips all whitespaces.

Here's how I thought it should be done:

namespace {
    const int kNotFound = -1;

    void SkipWhitespace(const char *s); // forward declaration - doesn't seem to work?
}

void foo(const char *s1, const char *s2) {
    // do some stuff

    SkipWhitespace(s1);
    SkipWhitespace(s2);

    // continue with other stuff
}

void SkipWhitespace(const char *s) {
    for (; !isspace(s); ++s) {}
}

But this gives me a compiler error. Do I need to put the definition within the unnamed namespace?

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You wrote const char s* down the listing. It's wrong. -> char *s –  DimG Dec 13 '10 at 12:07
    
you'll also want to make the function 'void SkipWhitespace(const char*&s)' –  Chris Becke Dec 13 '10 at 12:12
    
you're getting an error because of a typo in SkipWhitespace definition. Should be void SkipWhitespace(const char *s) –  greatwolf Dec 13 '10 at 12:14
    
Was only a typo in the posted source. –  helpermethod Dec 13 '10 at 12:16
1  
Yes. You want "SkipWhiteSpace" to return the pointer adjusted past the whitespace. –  Chris Becke Dec 13 '10 at 12:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have to define it in the anonymous namespace as well:

namespace {
    ...
    void SkipWhitespace(const char *s); // forward declaration - doesn't seem to work?
}

void foo(const char *s1, const char *s2) {
    ...
}

namespace {
    void SkipWhitespace(const char s*) {
        for (; !isspace(s); ++s) {}
    }
}

But unless there is a cyclic dependency, I'm not sure what the value of this is. Just declare and define the function in one go.

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4  
I like when you can read source code upside down, i.e. when function A calls function B, function B also follows function A in the source code. In Java this is no problem but I guess in C++ defining it directly is the way to go. –  helpermethod Dec 13 '10 at 12:13

An unnamed namespace behaves as if it was replaced with a namespace with a uniquely generated name immediately followed by a using directive.

This means that your function declaration belongs to a namespace exactly as if the namespace actually had a name. As such, its definition should live in the same namespace : either simultaneously declare and define the function, or add an enclosing namespace {} around the definition (which works because all occurrences of the unnamed namespace in a translation unit refer to the same namespace).

namespace {

void SkipWhitespace(const char s*) {
    for (; !isspace(s); ++s) {}
}

}
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You probably need to see this topic as well:

Superiority of unnamed namespace over static ?

BTW, why this function:

void SkipWhitespace(const char *s);

Why not this:

void SkipWhitespace(std::string &s);

??

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Sry I didn't mention that it was a homework assignment, where using the std::string class is prohibited. –  helpermethod Dec 13 '10 at 12:18
    
@Helper lol, a C++ assignment with std::string prohibited. Obviously, you have some fun courses... –  stefaanv Dec 13 '10 at 12:26
2  
Yeah, sadly it's one of those weird C/C++ course where you end up don't knowing either language :-(. –  helpermethod Dec 13 '10 at 12:28
    
@stefaanv : this is the usual situation in India here where students are taught C in the name of C++. But what happened to Germany? I didn't expect it. –  Nawaz Dec 13 '10 at 13:52
    
@Nawaz: obviously off-topic, but you got me interested: what happened in my neighbour-country that you didn't expect. The media hasn't informed us yet. Or are you talking about the Amsterdam scandal (Holland)? –  stefaanv Dec 14 '10 at 10:19

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