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Can you explain Liskov Substitution Principle (The 'L' of SOLID) with a good C# example covering all aspects of the principle in a simplified way? If it is really possible.

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Here's a simplified way of thinking about it in a nutshell: If I follow LSP, I can replace any object in my code with a Mock object, and the nothing in the calling code would need to be adjusted or changed to account for the substitution. LSP is a fundamental support for the Test by Mock pattern. –  kmote Jan 9 at 17:16
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2 Answers

up vote 44 down vote accepted

(This answer has been rewritten 2013-05-13, read the discussion in the bottom of the comments)

LSP is about following the contract of the base class.

You can for instance not throw new exceptions in the sub classes as the one using the base class would not expect that. Same goes for if the base class throws ArgumentNullException if an argument is missing and the sub class allows the argument to be null, also a LSP violation.

Here is an example of a class structure which violates LSP:

public interface IDuck
{
   void Swim();
   // contract says that IsSwimming should be true if Swim has been called.
   bool IsSwimming { get; }
}
public class OrganicDuck : IDuck
{
   public void Swim()
   {
      //do something to swim
   }

   bool IsSwimming { get { /* return if the duck is swimming */ } }
}
public class ElectricDuck : IDuck
{
   bool _isSwimming;

   public void Swim()
   {
      if (!IsTurnedOn)
        return;

      _isSwimming = true;
      //swim logic  

   }

   public IsSwimming { get { return _isSwimming; } }
}

And the calling code

void MakeDuckSwim(IDuck duck)
{
    duck.Swim();
}

As you can see, there are two examples of ducks. One organic duck and one electric duck. The electric duck can only swim if it's turned on. This breaks the LSP principle since it must be turned on to be able to swim as the IsSwimming (which also is part of the contract) won't be set as in the base class.

You can of course solve it by doing something like this

void MakeDuckSwim(IDuck duck)
{
    if (duck is ElectricDuck)
        ((ElectricDuck)duck).TurnOn();
    duck.Swim();
}

But that would break Open/Closed principle and has to be implemented everywhere (and thefore still generates unstable code).

The proper solution would be to automatically turn on the duck in the Swim method and by doing so make the electric duck behave exactly as defined by the IDuck interface

Update

Someone added a comment and removed it. It had a valid point that I'd like to address:

The solution with turning on the duck inside the Swim method can have side effects when working with the actual implementation (ElectricDuck). But that can be solved by using a explicit interface implementation. imho it's more likely that you get problems by NOT turning it on in Swim since it's expected that it will swim when using the IDuck interface

Update 2

Rephrased some parts to make it more clear.

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@jgauffin: Example is simple and clear. But the solution you propose, first: breaks the Open-Closed Principle and it does not fit to Uncle Bob's definition (see the conclusion part of his article) which writes:"The Liskov Substitution Principle (A.K.A Design by Contract) is an important feature of all programs that conform to the Open-Closed principle." see:objectmentor.com/resources/articles/lsp.pdf –  pencilCake Dec 13 '10 at 12:46
    
I don't see how the solution breaks Open/Closed. Read my answer again if you are referring to the if duck is ElectricDuck part. I had a seminar about SOLID last Thursday :) –  jgauffin Dec 13 '10 at 12:48
1  
@jgauffin:Please correct me if I am thinking wrongly; but when you do such a type check and if there is some new feature is added to our electric duck which would need to be completed before TurnOn() call (Like InflateTheDuck() ) then it means you have to modify MakeDuckSwim(IDuck duck) method as well. So you do not only extend your electric duck but you also modify MakeDuckSwim method. To me it sounds like a possible break of Open/Closed Principle. –  pencilCake Dec 13 '10 at 12:55
    
Read my answer again. I added the modification as an possible solution and explained why it's not a good idea to modify MakeDuckSwim. I also told how I would do (modify ElectricDuck.Swim) –  jgauffin Dec 13 '10 at 13:03
1  
@MystereMan: imho LSP is all about behavioral correctness. With the rectangle/square example you get the side effect of the other property being set. With the duck you get the side effect of it not swimming. LSP: if S is a subtype of T, then objects of type T in a program may be replaced with objects of type S without altering any of the desirable properties of that program (e.g., correctness). –  jgauffin May 13 '13 at 6:27
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public interface IDuck
{
    bool IsTurnedOn { get; set; }
    void Swim();
    void MakeDuckSwim();
}

public class Duck : IDuck
{
    public bool IsTurnedOn
    {
        get { return true; }
        set { value = true; }
    }

    public void Swim()
    {
        //do something to swim
    }
    private void TurnOn() 
    {
        //do nothing already on
    }
    public void MakeDuckSwim() 
    {
        Swim();
    }
}

public class ElectricDuck : IDuck
{
    public bool IsTurnedOn {get; set;}

    public void Swim()
    {
        if (!IsTurnedOn)
            TurnOn();

        //swim logic  
    }
    private void TurnOn()
    {
        IsTurnedOn = true;
    }
    public void MakeDuckSwim() 
    {
        if (!IsTurnedOn)
            TurnOn();

        Swim();
    }       
}

Then this will always work and follows all SOLID principles:

    duck.MakeDuckSwim();    
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33  
A real duck which is turned on behaves very different compared to an electric duck which is turned on. And it can get really ugly when the real duck finds a mate which also is turned on. –  jgauffin Mar 23 '12 at 12:33
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