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I have date stored as string in an sqlite database like "28/11/2010". I want to convert the string to date.

Specifically I have to convert lots of string dates between two dates.

In postgresql, I use to_date('30/11/2010','dd/MM/yyyy'), how can I do the same thing with sqlite?

Something like this:

SELECT * FROM table
    WHERE   to_date(column,'dd/MM/yyyy')
    BETWEEN to_date('01/11/2010','dd/MM/yyyy')
    AND     to_date('30/11/2010','dd/MM/yyyy')
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up vote 33 down vote accepted

As Sqlite doesn't have a date type you will need to do string comparison to achieve this. For that to work you need to reverse the order - eg from dd/MM/yyyy to yyyyMMdd, using something like

where substr(column,7)||substr(column,4,2)||substr(column,1,2) 
      between '20101101' and '20101130'
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1  
+1: If the date had been formatted in something that SQLite's date handling functions understand, it would have been possible to do something smarter. (Or if the date had been converted to julian days before storing in the DB.) But it wasn't, and the "date" needs to be mended. Of course, he could also try adding his own to_date function, but how to do that depends on what SQLite's embedded in (which we don't know). – Donal Fellows Dec 13 '10 at 13:25
1  
@Donal re creating his own to_date function, what's the betting that not all the strings in that field are not valid dates :-) – user533832 Dec 13 '10 at 14:13
    
My money stays in my wallet with that one. ;-) – Donal Fellows Dec 13 '10 at 14:48
    
I dont know if is the best solution but work :) – Claudio Jan 4 '11 at 15:30

Saved date as TEXT( 20/10/2013 03:26 ) To do query and to select records between dates?

Better version is:

SELECT TIMSTARTTIMEDATE 
FROM TIMER 
WHERE DATE(substr(TIMSTARTTIMEDATE,7,4)
||substr(TIMSTARTTIMEDATE,4,2)
||substr(TIMSTARTTIMEDATE,1,2)) 
BETWEEN DATE(20131020) AND DATE(20131021);

the substr from 20/10/2013 gives 20131020 date format DATE(20131021) - that makes SQL working with dates and using date and time functions.

OR

SELECT TIMSTARTTIMEDATE 
FROM TIMER 
WHERE DATE(substr(TIMSTARTTIMEDATE,7,4)
||'-'
||substr(TIMSTARTTIMEDATE,4,2)
||'-'
||substr(TIMSTARTTIMEDATE,1,2)) 
BETWEEN DATE('2013-10-20') AND DATE('2013-10-21');

and here is in one line

SELECT TIMSTARTTIMEDATE FROM TIMER WHERE DATE(substr(TIMSTARTTIMEDATE,7,4)||'-'||substr(TIMSTARTTIMEDATE,4,2)||'-'||substr(TIMSTARTTIMEDATE,1,2)) BETWEEN DATE('2013-10-20') AND DATE('2013-10-21');
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You saved my day brov. Thanks. Perfect one – Jigar Mar 10 at 12:47

One thing you should look into is the SQLite date and time functions, especially if you're going to have to manipulate a lot of dates. It's the sane way to use dates, at the cost of changing the internal format (has to be ISO, i.e. yyyy-MM-dd).

share|improve this answer
    
This documentation is over and over cited... However, IMO it needs to be reworked to find the information quickly. All meaningful details are buried. For instance, is it possible to determine the return type of the strftime function at first sight in less than 10 sec ...? No ! In any decent javadoc it's feasible. – Stephan Oct 11 '15 at 10:45
    
It's over cited because it's even more often ignored, but granted it could do with a rework. – MPelletier Oct 11 '15 at 14:23

This is for fecha(TEXT) format date YYYY-MM-dd HH:mm:ss for instance I want all the records of Ene-05-2014 (2014-01-05):

SELECT 
 fecha 
FROM 
 Mytable 
WHERE 
 DATE(substr(fecha ,1,4) ||substr(fecha ,6,2)||substr(fecha ,9,2))
BETWEEN 
 DATE(20140105) 
AND 
 DATE(20140105);
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The UDF approach is my preference compared to brittle substr values.

#!/usr/bin/env python3
import sqlite3
from dateutil import parser
from pprint import pprint


def date_parse(s):
    ''' Converts a string to a date '''
    try:
        t = parser.parse(s, parser.parserinfo(dayfirst=True))
        return t.strftime('%Y-%m-%d')
    except:
        return None


def dict_factory(cursor, row):
    ''' Helper for dict row results '''
    d = {}
    for idx, col in enumerate(cursor.description):
        d[col[0]] = row[idx]
    return d


def main():
    ''' Demonstrate UDF '''
    with sqlite3.connect(":memory:") as conn:
        conn.row_factory = dict_factory
        setup(conn)

        ##################################################
        # This is the code that matters. The rest is setup noise.
        conn.create_function("date_parse", 1, date_parse)
        cur = conn.cursor()
        cur.execute(''' select "date", date_parse("date") as parsed from _test order by 2; ''')
        pprint(cur.fetchall())
        ##################################################

def setup(conn):
    ''' Setup some values to parse '''
    cur = conn.cursor()

    # Make a table
    sql = '''
    create table _test (
        "id" integer primary key,
        "date" text
    );
    '''
    cur.execute(sql)

    # Fill the table
    dates = [
        '2/1/03', '03/2/04', '4/03/05', '05/04/06',
        '6/5/2007', '07/6/2008', '8/07/2009', '09/08/2010',
        '2-1-03', '03-2-04', '4-03-05', '05-04-06',
        '6-5-2007', '07-6-2008', '8-07-2009', '09-08-2010',
        '31/12/20', '31-12-2020',
        'BOMB!',
    ]
    params = [(x,) for x in dates]
    cur.executemany(''' insert into _test ("date") values(?); ''', params)


if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

This will give you these results:

[{'date': 'BOMB!', 'parsed': None},
 {'date': '2/1/03', 'parsed': '2003-01-02'},
 {'date': '2-1-03', 'parsed': '2003-01-02'},
 {'date': '03/2/04', 'parsed': '2004-02-03'},
 {'date': '03-2-04', 'parsed': '2004-02-03'},
 {'date': '4/03/05', 'parsed': '2005-03-04'},
 {'date': '4-03-05', 'parsed': '2005-03-04'},
 {'date': '05/04/06', 'parsed': '2006-04-05'},
 {'date': '05-04-06', 'parsed': '2006-04-05'},
 {'date': '6/5/2007', 'parsed': '2007-05-06'},
 {'date': '6-5-2007', 'parsed': '2007-05-06'},
 {'date': '07/6/2008', 'parsed': '2008-06-07'},
 {'date': '07-6-2008', 'parsed': '2008-06-07'},
 {'date': '8/07/2009', 'parsed': '2009-07-08'},
 {'date': '8-07-2009', 'parsed': '2009-07-08'},
 {'date': '09/08/2010', 'parsed': '2010-08-09'},
 {'date': '09-08-2010', 'parsed': '2010-08-09'},
 {'date': '31/12/20', 'parsed': '2020-12-31'},
 {'date': '31-12-2020', 'parsed': '2020-12-31'}]

The SQLite equivalent of anything this robust is a tangled weave of substr and instr calls that you should avoid.

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