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Why this is possible:

char buf[10], *pbuf = buf, **ppbuf = &pbuf;

and this isn't:

char buf[10], **ppbuf = &buf;

As I understand, the second line is just a shorthand of the first one.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

&buf has the wrong type. &buf is a pointer to an array of 10 char. ppbuf has to be initialized with a pointer to a pointer to a char.

In the first initialization, while buf denotes an array, it decays to a char* pointing to its first element so the initialization is valid.

You also can't do: char buf[10], **ppbuf = &(&buf[0]); because &buf[0] is not an lvalue so you can't take its address.

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The name of an array isn't the address of it's firest element? Or Does it work only in function's arguments? –  dimayak Dec 13 '10 at 12:37
2  
@dimayak: The array variable converts implicitly to the address of its first element (a char*), when appropriate. But it is not a pointer to a char*. –  Marcelo Cantos Dec 13 '10 at 12:39
4  
@dimayak: No. The name of an array is the name of an array. It decays to a pointer to its first element in expression contexts other than as an argument to unary & or sizeof. –  Charles Bailey Dec 13 '10 at 12:39

They're not equivalent.

*pbuf = buf

That means, "pbuf is a pointer to type char, whose value is the address of buf." Since buf is an array of chars, this works.

**ppbuf = &pbuf

That means, "ppbuf is a pointer to a pointer to type char, whose value is the address of pbuf." Since pbuf is a pointer to type char, this works.

**ppbuf = &buf

This means, "ppbuf is a pointer to a pointer to type char, whose value is the address of buf." Since buf is an array of chars, this fails.

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buf is an array, not a pointer, so you can't assign its address to a pointer pointer. pbuf is a pointer (to the first element of the array), so you can assign its address to a pointer pointer.

Think of the code this way:

typedef char* char_p;

char buf[10];
char_p *ppbuf = &buf;  // If this was legal...
*ppbuf = NULL;         // what would this mean?
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It's easy to see it's not the same when you start from:

*pbuf = buf

Since the indirection of pbuf is buf, pbuf contains the address of buf, thus:

pbuf = &buf

So:

**ppbuf != pbuf
**ppbuf != &buf
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