Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am very new to SQL. I want to know what happens when i use "IF EXISTS" or "IF NOT EXISTS". For ex: what is the difference between the following two statements:

Statement 1: (EXISTS)

IF EXISTS( SELECT ORDER_ID FROM DBO.ORDER_DETAILS WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032 )
BEGIN
     DELETE FROM DBO.ORDER_DETAILS WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032
END

Statement 2: (NOT EXISTS)

IF NOT EXISTS( SELECT ORDER_ID FROM DBO.ORDER_DETAILS WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032 )
BEGIN
     DELETE FROM DBO.ORDER_DETAILS WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032
END

What will the IF EXISTS or IF NOT EXISTS return? Which is better among these both? When to use IF EXISTS and when to use IF NOT EXISTS

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

You need the first statement. Basically "IF EXISTS" returns true if the query return 1 or more rows, so in you example it will return a single row (containing a field with value 1) so will execute the delete statement as you desire.

share|improve this answer
    
ok, then what about the second one? –  carolene Dec 13 '10 at 14:33
1  
The second one would be more appropriate if you wanted to insert something if it wasn't there. Eg. IF NOT EXISTS( SELECT 1 FROM DBO.ORDER_DETAILS WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032 ) BEGIN INSERT INTO DBO.ORDER_DETAILS (... some values) END –  Mark Robinson Dec 13 '10 at 14:44

If there are order_details with an order_id equal to 11032, your first statement will run :

DELETE FROM DBO.ORDER_DETAILS WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032

If there are not order_details with an order_id equal to 11032, then your second statement will run. Note that this is an empty set since you just checked that there were not orders with that order_id.

It's actually going to be easier, in this example, to just run the DELETE - the IF EXISTS and IF NOT EXISTS are superfluous.

share|improve this answer

IF EXISTS checks that the result set is not empty, and IF NOT EXISTS checks that the result set is empty.

Which is better among these both?

The one that gives you the appropriate semantics.

When to use "IF EXISTS" and when to use "IF NOT EXISTS"

When you need to check the non-emptiness or emptiness of a result set.

share|improve this answer
1  
Mate, I dint understand the phrase ".....checks that the result set is not not empty so empty....." –  carolene Dec 13 '10 at 14:27

Both statements will return a boolean true/false result.

EXISTS returns true if the result set IS NOT empty.

NOT EXISTS Is a negated operation, so it returns true if the result set IS empty

share|improve this answer
    
okay which is better in terms of performance? –  carolene Dec 13 '10 at 14:33
    
@carolene: Which one has the correct semantics is what matters first and foremost. –  Jason Dec 13 '10 at 14:55
    
Performance they are going to be similar, if anything NOT Exists could be slightly slower as it negates the result of EXISTS. –  Mitchel Sellers Dec 13 '10 at 19:01
    
" if anything NOT Exists could be slightly slower as it negates the result of EXISTS" -- I think the opposite is the case. Both EXISTS and NOT EXISTS can short citcuit. The data element name`ORDER_ID` suggests good selectivity and NOT EXISTS will evaluate FALSE (short circuit) as soon as a value is found that does not match the search condition ORDER_ID = 11032, likely to be first value it encounters. EXISTS does not return TRUE (short circuit) until a value is found to match the search condition, which could involve searching many, many orders before it is found. –  onedaywhen Dec 14 '10 at 8:21

"EXISTS simply tests whether the inner query returns any row. If it does, then the outer query proceeds. If not, the outer query does not execute, and the entire SQL statement returns nothing." See here. NOT EXISTS is the negation of EXISTS of course.

What the first statement does is that it will issue a DELETE query if the order can be found. The second one does not have any sense as it will issue the query on the ORDER when it does not exist.

share|improve this answer

This is certainly one way to use an EXISTS. I'm not sure that the second one would do anything though.

However, you could just

DELETE FROM DBO.ORDER_DETAILS WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032

and remove the EXISTS altogether, unless you wanted to perform

IF EXISTS ( SELECT ORDER_ID FROM ORDERS WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032 ) BEGIN
     DELETE FROM DBO.ORDER_DETAILS WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032
     DELETE FROM DBO.ORDERS WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032
END

or your actual code was more complex than what is shown.

Your second statement will never delete anything since, if there are rows, it will evaluate to FALSE and not perform the DELETE and if there are not rows, it will evaluate to TRUE and execute the DELETE which will do nothing since there are no rows.

As far as performance, in the context in which you use the EXISTS neither one has a better performance since it's really just evaluating whether the result set from the SELECT is NULL or not.

There is another use of EXISTS in which NOT EXISTS is much less efficient than EXISTS and can be effectively replaced with a better performing phrase. I'm referring to when you use NOT EXISTS in the WHERE clause of a statment. In this cause you would be better off performing a LEFT JOIN (instead of the INNER JOIN you likely have) and filter WHERE rightTable.SomeColumn IS NULL.

share|improve this answer
    
Mate, I am trying to optimize a Stored procedure so i need to use the "IF EXISTS" or "IF NOT EXISTS" condition before deleting the record. –  carolene Dec 13 '10 at 14:32
    
Why would optimizing it require the use of an EXISTS? Optimizing is reducing the overall complexity and the code you show increases the workload without cause. Unless, of course, your actual code is more complex. –  Brad Dec 13 '10 at 14:34
    
@carolene, see me recent updates. –  Brad Dec 13 '10 at 14:47

Here are 4 examples illustrating when you would use IF EXISTS and when you would use IF NOT EXISTS:

A) Delete related records from more than 1 table:

IF EXISTS (SELECT TOP(1) 1 FROM Table 1 WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032) BEGIN
    DELETE FROM Table 1 WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032
    DELETE FROM Table 2 WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032
    -- possibly more statements following here ...
END

B) Update record in more than 1 table if it exists:

IF EXISTS (SELECT TOP(1) 1 FROM Table 1 WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032) BEGIN
    UPDATE Table 1 SET Field1='X' WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032
    UPDATE Table 2 SET Field2='Y' WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032
    -- possibly more statements following here ...
END

C) Insert record in more than 1 table if it does not exist:

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT TOP(1) 1 FROM Table 1 WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032) BEGIN
    INSERT INTO Table 1(Field1, Field2, ORDER_ID) VALUES ('A', 'B', 11032)
    INSERT INTO Table 2(Field3, Field4, ORDER_ID) VALUES ('X', 'Y', 11032)
    -- possibly more statements following here ...
END

D) Upsert (=insert or update) record, depending on existence:

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT TOP(1) 1 FROM Table 1 WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032) BEGIN
    INSERT INTO Table 1(Field1, Field2, ORDER_ID) VALUES ('X', 'B', 11032)
    -- possibly more statements following here ...
END
ELSE BEGIN
    UPDATE Table 1 SET Field1='X' WHERE ORDER_ID = 11032
    -- possibly more statements following here ...
END

NOTES:

  • If there is just one table affected, you would not use EXIST in any of the examples above, except in the upsert example D).
  • SELECT TOP (1) 1 FROM ... is more efficient, because it aborts after the 1st match is found, then it returns just number 1 (which is more efficient to select for instance a NVARCHAR(max) field)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.