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Ok, here's a problem script.

var links = [ 'one', 'two', 'three' ];

for( var i = 0; i < links.length; i++ ) {
    var a = document.createElement( 'div' );
    a.innerHTML = links[i];
    a.onclick = function() { alert( i ) }
    document.body.appendChild( a );
}

This script generates three divs: one, two and three, using an array.
I've set a (Dom0 for simplicity) click handler on each div which alerts the index of its position in the array. - except it doesn't! It always alerts 3, the last index of the array.
This is because the 'i' in 'alert( i )' is a live reference to the outer scope (in this case global) and its value is 3 at the end of the loop. What it needs is a way of de-referencing i within the loop.

This is one solution and I tend to use it.

var links = [ 'one', 'two', 'three' ];

for( var i = 0; i < links.length; i++ ) {
    var a = document.createElement( 'div' );
    a.innerHTML = links[i];
    a.i = i; //set a property of the current element with the current value of i
    a.onclick = function() { alert( this.i ) }
    document.body.appendChild( a );
}

Does anyone else do anything different?
Is there a really smart way of doing it?
Does anyone know how the libraries do this?

share|improve this question
    
Actually, in your first code sample above, the alert displays 3 rather than 2 as i incrementing to 3 causes the loop to stop -- I know it's nit picky, but just thought I'd bring up! Good question, though! –  Peter Meyer Jan 14 '09 at 14:03
    
oops! - yep, 3, I'll edit –  meouw Jan 14 '09 at 14:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You need to use this little closure trick - create and execute a function that returns your event handler function.

var links = [ 'one', 'two', 'three' ];

for( var i = 0; i < links.length; i++ ) {
    var a = document.createElement( 'div' );
    a.innerHTML = links[i];
    a.onclick = (function(i) { return function() { alert( i ) } })(i);
    document.body.appendChild( a );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works like a charm, thanks RoBorg! Let's see what else turns up. –  meouw Jan 14 '09 at 13:49
    
One should use closures sparingly - they might screw with the garbage collector, especially when assigned as event handlers as they'll most likely live indefinetly... –  Christoph Jan 14 '09 at 14:10
    
you can always use addEventListener, stash the routine and then call removeEventListener when you're leaving the page (onunload() ?) –  Jason S Jan 14 '09 at 14:14
3  
You can achieve the same thing without passing 'i' around by creating a locally scoped variable: (function() { var local = i; return function() { alert(local); } })(); Six-of-one and all that, but I prefer this approach because otherwise I tend to forget the variable as a parameter somewhere. –  Grant Wagner Jan 14 '09 at 14:52
    
@Christoph, I would like to know why you think that is the case. Leveraging closures is a fundamental tool in javascript and if your events are removed from an element correctly when the element is removed from the DOM I've never seen evidence of leaks. –  Prestaul Jan 15 '09 at 0:32

I recommend Christophs way with one function since it uses less resources.

Below is another way that stores the value on the function (that is possible because a function is an object) and users argument.callee to get a reference to the function inside the function. In this case it doesn't make much sense, but I show the technique since it can be useful in other ways:

var links = [ 'one', 'two', 'three' ];

for( var i = 0; i < links.length; i++ ) {
    var a = document.createElement( 'div' );
    a.innerHTML = links[i];
    a.onclick = function() { alert( arguments.callee.i ) }
    a.onclick.i = i;
    document.body.appendChild( a );
}

The technique is useful when your function needs to store persistent information between calls. Replace the part above with this:

a.id="div"+i;
a.onclick = function() {
    var me = arguments.callee;
    me.count=(me.count|0) + 1;
    alert( me.i );
}

and you can later retrieve how many times it was called:

for( var i = 0; i < links.length; i++ ){
    alert(document.getElementById("div"+i).onclick.count);
}

It can also be used to cache information between calls.

share|improve this answer

RoBorg's method is definitely the way to go, but I like a slightly different syntax. Both accomplish the same thing of creating a closure that preserves 'i', this syntax is just clearer to me and requires less modification of your existing code:

var links = [ 'one', 'two', 'three' ];

for( var i = 0; i < links.length; i++ ) (function(i) {
    var a = document.createElement( 'div' );
    a.innerHTML = links[i];
    a.onclick = function() { alert( i ) }
    document.body.appendChild( a );
})(i);
share|improve this answer

I'd stay with your own solution, but modify it in the following way:

var links = [ 'one', 'two', 'three' ];

function handler() {
    alert( this.i );
}

for( var i = 0; i < links.length; i++ ) {
    var a = document.createElement( 'div' );
    a.innerHTML = links[i];
    a.i = i; //set a property of the current element with the current value of i
    a.onclick = handler;
    document.body.appendChild( a );
}

This way, only one function object gets created - otherwise, the function literal will be evaluated on every iteration step!

A solution via closure is even worse performance-wise than your original code.

share|improve this answer
    
Why pollute the global namespace when the function can be declared inline? What does it gain you? –  Prestaul Jan 15 '09 at 0:35
    
@Prestaul: Less objects, less memory, faster. Put it inside a function and the global namespace won't be polluted by the handler nor the array with links. –  some Jan 15 '09 at 6:36

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