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class Temp {
    public : 
        Temp(X& x): x_(x) {}
        Temp(X& x, Y& y) : x_(x), y_(y) {}
        ...
    private:
        X& x_;
        Y& y_;
}

I got the error because in case of Temp(X& x): x_(x) the reference y_ is not initialized. What is the common practice to write such a class correctly ?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I will suggest another approach, even though that may be not what you are looking for.

It doesn't use reference variables (memory pointers instead), it also doesn't use boost, but it will allow you to keep both constructors without spending any more memory resources.

#include <iostream>

class Temp
{
    public :
        Temp(int& x): x_(&x), y_(NULL) {}
        Temp(int& x, int& y) : x_(&x), y_(&y) {}
        void print() { std::cout << "*x_: " << *x_ << std::endl; }

    private:
        int* x_;
        int* y_;
};

int main()
{
    int x = 5;
    Temp tmp(x);

    tmp.print();

    return 0;
}
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You cannot have reference members that aren't initialized! If this is the case, consider wrapping the reference in a boost::optional, then you can optionally construct the reference.

EDIT: here is the boost::optional approach...

class Temp {
    public : 
        Temp(X& x): x_(x) {}
        Temp(X& x, Y& y) : x_(x), y_(y) {}
        ...
    private:
        X& x_;
        boost::optional<Y&> y_; // by default this is constructed with none_t
}
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boost::optional works with reference types for the template type? Now I want to look up how they got that to work.... –  Karl Knechtel Dec 13 '10 at 17:37
    
@Karl, yip - it's one the best features of boost::optional IMHO... –  Nim Dec 13 '10 at 21:27

Having a data member that is a reference is a STRONG contract: It means you CANNOT have a nullptr or undefined object, your class Needs this object, the object needs to exist.

As a consequence your first constructor violates this strong contract, and accordingly cannot compile.

As karlphillip suggests: you should use pointers since you do not want to respect such a contract that assures that _y is always defined.

It is valid having references as member, if your class doesnt have sense without the pre-existence of the referenced objects.

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It is certainly valid, but my position is that this sort of "this other thing must exist" precondition is unusual, and might indicate a design flaw (can't we just acquire our own resource? Do we actually want to be using OO for this particular bit of functionality? etc.) Reference data members can also be tricky to deal with: in addition to the OP's problem, consider the task of writing a copy constructor - or an assignment operator. It takes that much more thinking to reason through the proper semantics, and more effort to satisfy the compiler too. But +1 for describing the contract. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 13 '10 at 17:34
    
@Karl, your right sometimes it can be a design flaw. I'll remove the -1 I gave you ;-) –  Stephane Rolland Dec 13 '10 at 17:45
    
There are pretty few things in programming that I'm completely inflexible about. But when I think something is often not the right idea, I like to word my objections strongly, because I fear that otherwise people will find it too easy to justify a bad design for their particular situation. "Oh, but I'm special"; no; special cases aren't special enough. ;) –  Karl Knechtel Dec 13 '10 at 17:53
    
@karl sorry they wouldnt let me cancel the downvote unless you edit your answer... strange i had never seen such limitation.. –  Stephane Rolland Dec 13 '10 at 20:24

The common practice, in all honesty, is to not use references as data members of a struct or class. Why do you think you want to do this? A reference is, conceptually, another name for an already existing thing. Objects are, well, objects. You ought to be able to create them out of whole cloth. Sometimes they'll have pointers (or instances of some smart pointer class) to other stuff that already exists, but at least the pointer itself is real data.

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3  
A narrow view, and I don't agree. Sometimes a reference member is the best way to capture something. For example, short-lived classes that are used to parse or enumerate some data blob might have a reference to that data blob. –  John Dibling Dec 13 '10 at 15:19
1  
-1: no, reference as member of a class is a constraint on the pre-existence of the referenced object. Already used it, and seen it used. –  Stephane Rolland Dec 13 '10 at 16:46

You have a reference to y_! References must be initialed and your first constructor does not. If you can't bind to y when the class is created you should probably use a pointer.

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Eliminate the first constructor or eliminate the second reference. If you have a reference then you must initialize it right away. If you must provide a constructor that default-initializes the Y member then make the Y member a pointer or an automatic variable.

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