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I want to do something like:

SELECT * FROM USER WHERE NAME LIKE '%Smith%';

My attempt in Arel:

# params[:query] = 'Smith'
User.where("name like '%?%'", params[:query]).to_sql

However, this becomes:

SELECT * FROM USER WHERE NAME LIKE '%'Smith'%';

Arel wraps the query string 'Smith' correctly, but because this is a LIKE statement it doesnt work.

How does one do a LIKE query in Arel?

P.S. Bonus--I am actually trying to scan two fields on the table, both name and description, to see if there are any matches to the query. How would that work?

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1  
I updated the arel answer for the bonus. –  Pedro Morte Rolo May 29 '14 at 14:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 207 down vote accepted

The previous answer is not in arel. This one is:

users = User.arel_table
User.where(users[:name].matches("%#{user_name}%"))

PS:

users = User.arel_table
query_string = "%#{params[query]}%"
User.where(users[:name].matches(query_string)\
                       .or(users[:description].matches(query_string)))
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8  
Unlike using where("name like ?", ...), this approach is more portable across different databases. For example, it would result in ILIKE being used in a query against a Postgres db. –  dkobozev Nov 2 '11 at 21:46
12  
is this protected against SQL injections? –  sren May 28 '12 at 2:17
3  
This does NOT protect fully against SQL injection. Try setting user_name to "%". The query will return matches –  travis-146 Jul 22 '13 at 15:22
2  
Also if you don't know you can try from console via User.where(users[:name].matches("%TRUNCATE users;%")).to_sql This will show that it is escaped and contained in single quotes. –  earlonrails Aug 28 '13 at 19:02
3  
Use .gsub(/[%_]/, '\\\\\0') for escaping MySql wildcard chars. –  Ando Aug 30 '13 at 10:58

Try

User.where("name like ?", "%#{params[:query]}%").to_sql

PS.

q = "%#{params[:query]}%"
User.where("name like ? or description like ?", q, q).to_sql
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9  
How does Rails know not to escape % in the substituted string? It seems like if you only wanted a one-sided wildcard, there's nothing stopping the user from submitting a query value that includes % at both ends (I know that in practice, Rails prevents % from showing up in a query string, but it seems like there should be protection against this at the ActiveRecord level). –  Steven Xu Dec 31 '10 at 8:26
8  
Isn't this vulnerable to SQL injection attacks? –  Behrang Nov 14 '11 at 0:58
6  
@Behrang no 8) User.where("name like %#{params[:query]}% or description like%#{params[:query]}%").to_sql would be vulnerable, but, in the format I show, Rails escapes params[:query] –  Reuben Mallaby Nov 18 '11 at 21:36
5  
    
Sorry for offtopic. I have the sql git of method to_sql or arel manager, how to execute the sql on db? –  Малъ Скрылевъ Apr 26 '14 at 18:02

Reuben Mallaby's answer can be shortened further to use parameter bindings:

User.where("name like :kw or description like :kw", :kw=>"%#{params[:query]}%").to_sql
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