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i have the following method :

string Company::cheap(list<Candidate*>& candidates) {
    candidates.sort(candidateSalaryCompare);
    for (std::list<Candidate*>::iterator iter = candidates.begin(); iter
    != candidates.end(); ++iter) {
    }
    int m(candidates.front()->getExpectedSalary());
    list<Candidate*> potentialList;
    for (std::list<Candidate*>::iterator iter = candidates.begin(); (*iter)->getExpectedSalary()
    == m && iter != candidates.end(); ++iter)
        potentialList.push_back(*iter);
    if (potentialList.size() > 0)
        potentialList.sort(candidateIdCompare);
    return potentialList.front()->getId();
}

running it as is and my program works, but if i remove the empty FOR loop in the beginning (which doesn't do anything) i get a segmentation fault. any clues ?

EDIT

candidate class, and actually i'm not sure at what line i'm getting the segfault, i'm using eclipse and the debugger doesn't seem to work

#include "../include/Candidate.h"
#include <iostream>
#include "../include/AppLogger.h"
#include <sstream>

Candidate::Candidate(string id, list<Skill> skills, list<
        string> desiredJobs, double expectedSalary) :
        id_(id), dateJoined_(), skills_(skills),
        desiredJobs_(desiredJobs), expectedSalary_(expectedSalary),
        originalSalary_(expectedSalary), gotJob_(0) {
}


void Candidate::compromise(const DateTime& currentDate) {
    double salaryAfter30(0.9*this->originalSalary_);
    double salaryAfter60(0.8*this->originalSalary_);
    double salaryAfter90(0.7*this->originalSalary_);
    Timespan duration = currentDate - this->dateJoined_;
    if (duration.days() == 30 || duration.days() == 60 || duration.days() == 90) {
        if (duration.days() == 30 && (this->expectedSalary_
                == this->originalSalary_)) {
            this->expectedSalary_ = salaryAfter30;
            std::stringstream sstm;
            sstm << "Candidate "<< this->getId() <<" is willing to compromise, and his expected salary is " <<this->expectedSalary_ << ".";
            CAppLogger::Instance().Log(sstm.str(),
                    Poco::Message::PRIO_WARNING);
            return;
        }
        else if (duration.days()==30)
            poco_bugcheck_msg("Error, 30 days passed, worker already compromised");
        if (duration.days() == 60 && (this->expectedSalary_ == salaryAfter30)) {
            this->expectedSalary_ = salaryAfter60;
            std::stringstream sstm;

            sstm << "Candidate "<< this->getId() <<" is willing to compromise, and his expected salary is " <<this->expectedSalary_ << ".";
            CAppLogger::Instance().Log(sstm.str(),
                    Poco::Message::PRIO_WARNING);
            return;
        }
        else if (duration.days()==60)
            poco_bugcheck_msg("Error, 60 days passed, worker already compromised");

        if ((duration.days() == 90) && (this->expectedSalary_ == salaryAfter60)) {
            this->expectedSalary_ = salaryAfter90;
            std::stringstream sstm;
            sstm << "Candidate "<< this->getId() <<" is willing to compromise, and his expected salary is " <<this->expectedSalary_ << ".";
            CAppLogger::Instance().Log(sstm.str(),
                    Poco::Message::PRIO_WARNING);
            return;
        }
        else if (duration.days()==90)
            poco_bugcheck_msg("Error, 90 days passed, worker already compromised");

    }
    else poco_bugcheck_msg("Error, worker told to compromise when not needed");


}

list<Skill> Candidate::getSkills() const {
    return this->skills_;
}

list<string> Candidate::getDesiredJobs() const {
    return this->desiredJobs_;

}
double Candidate::getExpectedSalary() const {
    return this->expectedSalary_;
}
DateTime Candidate::getDateJoined() const {
    return this->dateJoined_;
}
DateTime Candidate::getDateLeft() const {
    return this->dateLeft_;
}
void Candidate::setDateLeft(const DateTime& date) {
    this->dateLeft_ = date;
}
string Candidate::getId() const {
    return this->id_;
}

void Candidate::setDateJoined(const DateTime& date) {
    this->dateJoined_=date;
    this->setGotJob();
}

void Candidate::setGotJob() {
    if (this->gotJob_==1)
        std::cerr<<"error, setting gotJob while already has job"<<std::endl;
    this->gotJob_=1;
}
bool Candidate::gotJob() const {
    return this->gotJob_;
}
void Candidate::setQl(double ql){
        jobQl_=ql;
}

int Candidate::getQl() const{
    return this->jobQl_;
}

after applying the supplied solutions i get the following error :

assignment2(48823) malloc: *** mmap(size=140734799806464) failed (error code=12)
*** error: can't allocate region
*** set a breakpoint in malloc_error_break to debug
terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::bad_alloc'
  what():  std::bad_alloc

EDIT

changed int m to double m and now it seems to work because get expected salary returns a double but why did it cause that error ?

share|improve this question
3  
On which line are you getting the segfault? Depending on the definition of the Candidate class and of Candidate::iterator, you might want to not assume that the loop doesn't do anything - could you post those as well? –  Mihai Limbășan Dec 13 '10 at 15:56
    
The edit is a good candidate for a different question. The issue there is that you are trying to allocate too long a block at once. You should try to do as the error message suggests and add a breakpoint to malloc_error_break (or at least get a core dump to determine what part of your code is triggering the issue. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 13 '10 at 16:44
2  
The problem is actually that without changing m to double, potentialList is empty and the return statement invokes UB. Adding a breakpoint as suggested by the error message is likely to only waste time. See my answer below for more info. –  Chris Hopman Dec 13 '10 at 19:56
1  
don't forget to accept an answer once you are satisfied. I recommend Cris Hopman's for completeness. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 14 '10 at 0:46
    
why did you accept my answer, when there is a more complete answer offered? It might be the case that my answer contained the particular issue, but I am sure that @Chris Hopman's answer is more valuable than mine (including the iterator problem)... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 27 '10 at 23:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Please, look at Cris Hopman answer here, as his answer is much more complete and detailed than mine pointing to other issues that can/will cause undefined behavior (segmentation fault) in the original code.

This condition is wrong:

for (std::list<Candidate*>::iterator iter = candidates.begin(); (*iter)->getExpectedSalary()
== m && iter != candidates.end(); ++iter)

You should reorder so that the test for end() comes before the dereference and keep the short circuit evaluation. As it is, you are dereferencing a pointer past the end of the container:

for (std::list<Candidate*>::iterator iter = candidates.begin(); 
     iter != candidates.end() && (*iter)->getExpectedSalary() == m; ++iter)
share|improve this answer

Your second for loop, specifically the condition, could be dangerous:

(*iter)->getExpectedSalary() == m && iter != candidates.end()

This is because it deferences iter to compare against m before actually checking if the iterator is valid. You need to invert the order of the checks so the condition becomes:

iter != candidates.end() && (*iter)->getExpectedSalary() == m
share|improve this answer

Let me break this up a little...

...
    int m(candidates.front()->getExpectedSalary());

You assume that candidates is nonempty, this is fine if it is documented but I would add

assert(!candidates.empty())

at the beginning of the function. This both enforces the constraint and makes the constraint clear to anyone reading the code.

Second, getExpectedSalary() returns a double that you are converting to an int... more on this later.

    list<Candidate*> potentialList;
    for (std::list<Candidate*>::iterator iter = candidates.begin(); 
        (*iter)->getExpectedSalary() == m && iter != candidates.end(); ++iter)
       potentialList.push_back(*iter);

Two problems here: iter != candidates.end() should be the first part of the conditional, otherwise you may dereference an invalid iterator in the first part. Second, the equality check is bad. It may fail for even the first item in the list because if d is a double then it is not necessarily the case that (int)d == d. The point is that m should be a double. With that change, the test may still fail unexpectedly since it is a floating point comparison, see here.

    if (potentialList.size() > 0)
        potentialList.sort(candidateIdCompare);
    return potentialList.front()->getId();

This is inconsistent. In the if you assume that potentialList might be empty, but in the return you assume that it can't be empty. In fact, potentialList should not be empty (as it should at the very least contain candidates.front()) and so this should be changed to:

    assert(!potentialList.empty());
    potentialList.sort(candidateIdCompare);
    return potentialList.front()->getId();

If you make only that change, you will find that the assert will fail. You will then realize that potentialList is empty because of the conversion from double to int discussed above.

Finally, it appears that you are storing monetary values as floating point. This can cause problems, be careful. It is often much safer to use only fixed-point for such, but is not necessary.

As a last note, this function itself is overly complex. The below should work (no guarantees)...

string Company::cheap(list<Candidate*>& candidates) {
    typedef list<Candidate*> list_t;
    assert(!candidates.empty());

    candidates.sort(candidateSalaryCompare);
    pair<list_t, list_t> rng = equal_range(candidates.begin(), candidates.end(),
        candidates.front(), candidateSalaryCompare);

    assert(rng.first != rng.second);
    return (*min_element(rng.first, rng.second, candidateIdCompare))->getId();
}

This also conveniently offloads all the salary comparison to one other function and so it only has to be done correctly once.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1, This answer is much more complete and detailed than mine and deserves to be accepted and much more reputation that it is getting. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 14 '10 at 0:44

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